Tag Archive: Avian influenza


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New bird flu outbreak: More than 60 farms in France infected

© Luc Gnago
New cases of highly pathogenic avian flu in poultry have recently been detected in south-western regions of France, forcing authorities to step up sanitary measures.

The total number of confirmed cases of contamination with the virus in France has risen to 61, according to a statement from the French Ministry of Agriculture. The statement was published on Tuesday.

 

 

🔴GRIPPE AVIAIRE 8 nouveaux foyers identifiés dans les Landes. 61 foyers désormais touchés dans le sud-ouest

 

Special protection zones stretching for between 3 to 10 kilometers around the farms have been set up until the epidemic ceases, a decree published in the Official Journal said.

There is currently no evidence that the virus is transmitted to humans through birds’ eggs, meat or foie gras, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the European Centre for Disease and Control (ECDC) stated.

 

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Earth Watch Report   –  Biological Hazards

File:Two species of penguim at Arctowski Polish Station.jpg

Close to Arctowisky Station there is a huge penguin colony.  by  José Nestor Cardoso

Wikimedia . org

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Today Biological Hazard Antarctica [The area was not defined] Damage level Details

 

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RSOE EDIS

Biological Hazard in Antarctica on Tuesday, 06 May, 2014 at 10:11 (10:11 AM) UTC.

Description
A new kind of bird flu has been detected for the first time in Antarctica. The virus has been found in Adelie penguins – although it doesn’t appear to make them sick. Researchers say the virus is unlike any other avian flu known to science and raises a lot of unanswered questions. The findings show avian influenza viruses can get down to Antarctica and be maintained in penguin populations.
Biohazard name: H5Nx – Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (new strain)
Biohazard level: 4/4 Hazardous
Biohazard desc.: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, H5N1(bird flu), Dengue hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic or unidentified diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 (P4) lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

 

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Distinct Avian Influenza Virus Identified in Antarctica Penguins

First Posted: May 06, 2014 09:06 AM EDT

Distinct Avian Influenza Virus Identified in Antarctica Penguins

Distinct Avian Influenza Virus Identified in Antarctica Penguins (Photo : Aeron Hurt, WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza in Melbourne, Australia.)

An international team of researchers has identified a distinct avian influenza virus in a group of Antarctica’s Adelie penguins.

According to the finding documented in the journal of American Society of Microbiology, the avian influenza virus is different from the circulating avian flu.

Studies conducted earlier did not detect the live influenza virus in Antarctic’s penguins or other birds.

The study was led by associate professor Aeron Hurt, PhD, a senior research scientist at the WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza in Melbourne, Australia.

The researchers worked on the swab samples taken from Adelie penguins’ windpipes. They also collected samples from posterior openings. Apart from this, blood samples from 270 penguins were taken from two sites on the Antarctic Peninsula.

The two regions included Admiralty Bay and Rada Covadonga. All the samples were collected during January and February 2013.

 

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Earth Watch  Report  –  Biological Hazards

H7N9 Virus Origin Diagram expanded

"This

This diagram depicts the origins of the H7N9 virus from China and shows how the virus’s genes came from other influenza viruses in birds.

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Biological Hazard China Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, Hong Kong Damage level Details

 

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RSOE EDIS

Biological Hazard in China on Monday, 14 April, 2014 at 02:59 (02:59 AM) UTC.

Description
The Hong Kong Centre for Health Protection (CHP) of the Department of Health (DH) is   investigating an imported human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) affecting a woman aged 85. The patient, with underlying medical conditions, traveled to Dongguan from April 4 to 5 with her husband and younger brother. They lived at their relatives’ home where their relatives have reared chickens. The patient also visited a wet market near their home there and helped in slaughtering chickens at home on April 4. She returned to Hong Kong on April 5, and developed fever, cough with blood-stained sputum and shortness of breath since April 11. She was sent to the Accident and Emergency Department of Tseung Kwan O Hospital (TKOH) by ambulance today and was subsequently admitted. She is currently managed under isolation and her condition is critical. Her respiratory specimen was positive for avian influenza A(H7N9) virus upon preliminary laboratory testing by the CHP’s Public Health Laboratory Services Branch today. This is the 10th imported human H7N9 avian flu case to date. Initial investigation revealed that the patient had visited her husband at Haven of Hope Hospital (HHH) on April 10 who was admitted due to other illness. Her husband has remained asymptomatic so far and is currently under observation at HHH. Apart from her husband, seven other family members of the patient are also considered as close contacts. One of them had sore throat since April 12 and his condition is stable. The other close contacts have remained asymptomatic so far. These close contacts will be admitted to hospital for observation and their respiratory specimens will be taken for preliminary laboratory testing. The CHP’s investigations and tracing of other contacts are ongoing. The patient’s brother who traveled to Dongguan with the patient, relevant healthcare workers, ambulance staff and patients who had stayed in the same cubicle with the patient’s husband at HHH are being traced for exposure assessment and medical surveillance.
Biohazard name: H7N9 – Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus
Biohazard level: 4/4 Hazardous
Biohazard desc.: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, H5N1(bird flu), Dengue hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic or unidentified diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 (P4) lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

 

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Traditional Chinese Simplified Chinese Email this article news.gov.hk
Imported human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) under CHP investigation
*********************************************************     The Centre for Health Protection (CHP) of the Department of Health (DH) is today (April 9) investigating an imported human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) affecting a woman aged 82.The patient, with underlying medical conditions, lives in Liwan, Guangzhou with her family. She has presented with cough with blood-stained sputum since April 7 but had no fever.

She came to Hong Kong with her two family members by car via Lok Ma Chau Spur Line Control Point yesterday (April 8). Upon arrival, she was directly transferred to the Accident and Emergency Department of North District Hospital by ambulance and was admitted for further management under isolation on the same day. Her current condition is stable.

Her sputum specimen was tested positive for avian influenza A(H7N9) virus upon preliminary laboratory testing by the CHP’s Public Health Laboratory Services Branch tonight.

The patient has been transferred to Princess Margaret Hospital for isolation and treatment.

Her exposure history to poultry is under investigation.

The CHP’s investigations and contact tracing are ongoing. The patient’s family members in Hong Kong, relevant healthcare workers, ambulance staff and immigration officer at Lok Ma Chau Spur Line Control Point are being traced for exposure assessment and medical surveillance.

“The Serious Response Level under the Government’s Preparedness Plan for Influenza Pandemic remains activated and the CHP’s follow-up actions are in full swing,” a spokesman for the CHP remarked.

This is the ninth confirmed human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) in Hong Kong. The CHP will notify the World Health Organization (WHO), the National Health and Family Planning Commission as well as health and quarantine authorities of Guangdong and Macau.

Locally, enhanced surveillance of suspected cases in public and private hospitals is underway. The CHP will continue to maintain liaison with the WHO, the Mainland and overseas health authorities to monitor the latest developments. Local surveillance activities will be modified upon the WHO’s recommendations.

“In view of human cases of avian influenza A(H7N9) confirmed locally and in the Mainland, further cases are expected in affected and possibly neighbouring areas. Those planning to travel outside Hong Kong should maintain good personal, environmental and food hygiene at all times,” the spokesman urged.

“All boundary control points have implemented disease prevention and control measures. Thermal imaging systems are in place for body temperature checks of inbound travellers. Random temperature checks by handheld devices have also been arranged. Suspected cases will be immediately referred to public hospitals for follow-up investigation,” the spokesman added.

Regarding health education for travellers, display of posters in departure and arrival halls, in-flight public announcements, environmental health inspection and provision of regular updates to the travel industry via meetings and correspondence are proceeding.

The spokesman advised travellers, especially those returning from avian influenza-affected areas and provinces with fever or respiratory symptoms, to immediately wear masks, seek medical attention and reveal their travel history to doctors. Healthcare professionals should pay special attention to patients who might have had contact with poultry, birds or their droppings in affected areas and provinces.

“We have enhanced publicity and health education to reinforce health advice on the prevention of avian influenza,” the spokesman said.

As of 4pm today, the CHP’s hotline (2125 1111) for public enquiries has received 217 calls since the first confirmed human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) in Hong Kong.

Members of the public should remain vigilant and take heed of the preventive advice against avian influenza below:

* Do not visit live poultry markets and farms. Avoid contact with poultry, birds and their droppings. If contact has been made, thoroughly wash hands with soap;
* Avoid entering areas where poultry may be slaughtered and contact with surfaces which might be contaminated by droppings of poultry or other animals;
* Poultry and eggs should be thoroughly cooked before eating;
* Wash hands frequently with soap, especially before touching the mouth, nose or eyes, handling food or eating; after going to the toilet or touching public installations or equipment (including escalator handrails, elevator control panels and door knobs); or when hands are dirtied by respiratory secretions after coughing or sneezing;
* Cover the nose and mouth while sneezing or coughing, hold the spit with a tissue and put it into a covered dustbin;
* Avoid crowded places and contact with fever patients; and
* Wear masks when respiratory symptoms develop or when taking care of fever patients.

The public may visit the CHP’s avian influenza page (www.chp.gov.hk/en/view_content/24244.html) and website (www.chp.gov.hk/files/pdf/global_statistics_avian_influenza_e.pdf) for more information on avian influenza-affected areas and provinces.

Ends/Wednesday, April 9, 2014
Issued at HKT 22:18

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Traditional Chinese Simplified Chinese Email this article news.gov.hk
Imported human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) under CHP investigation
*********************************************************     The Centre for Health Protection (CHP) of the Department of Health (DH) is today (April 13) investigating an imported human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) affecting a woman aged 85.The patient, with underlying medical conditions, travelled to Dongguan from April 4 to 5 with her husband and younger brother. They lived at their relatives’ home where their relatives have reared chickens. The patient also visited a wet market near their home there and helped in slaughtering chickens at home on April 4. She returned to Hong Kong on April 5, and developed fever, cough with blood-stained sputum and shortness of breath since April 11. She was sent to the Accident and Emergency Department of Tseung Kwan O Hospital (TKOH) by ambulance today and was subsequently admitted. She is currently managed under isolation and her condition is critical.

Her respiratory specimen was positive for avian influenza A(H7N9) virus upon preliminary laboratory testing by the CHP’s Public Health Laboratory Services Branch today.

Initial investigation revealed that the patient had visited her husband at Haven of Hope Hospital (HHH) on April 10 who was admitted due to other illness. Her husband has remained asymptomatic so far and is currently under observation at HHH.

Apart from her husband, seven other family members of the patient are also considered as close contacts. One of them had sore throat since April 12 and his condition is stable. The other close contacts have remained asymptomatic so far.  These close contacts will be admitted to hospital for observation and their respiratory specimens will be taken for preliminary laboratory testing.

The CHP’s investigations and tracing of other contacts are ongoing. The patient’s brother who travelled to Dongguan with the patient, relevant healthcare workers, ambulance staff and patients who had stayed in the same cubicle with the patient’s husband at HHH are being traced for exposure assessment and medical surveillance.

The CHP will liaise with the relevant Mainland health authority to follow up on the patient’s contacts during her stay in the Mainland.

“The Serious Response Level under the Government’s Preparedness Plan for Influenza Pandemic remains activated and the CHP’s follow-up actions are in full swing,” a spokesman for the CHP remarked.

This is the tenth confirmed human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) in Hong Kong. The CHP will notify the World Health Organization (WHO), the National Health and Family Planning Commission as well as health and quarantine authorities of Guangdong and Macau.

Locally, enhanced surveillance of suspected cases in public and private hospitals is underway. The CHP will continue to maintain liaison with the WHO, the Mainland and overseas health authorities to monitor the latest developments. Local surveillance activities will be modified upon the WHO’s recommendations.

“In view of human cases of avian influenza A(H7N9) confirmed locally and in the Mainland, further cases are expected in affected and possibly neighbouring areas. Those planning to travel outside Hong Kong should maintain good personal, environmental and food hygiene at all times,” the spokesman urged.

“All boundary control points have implemented disease prevention and control measures. Thermal imaging systems are in place for body temperature checks of inbound travellers. Random temperature checks by handheld devices have also been arranged. Suspected cases will be immediately referred to public hospitals for follow-up investigation,” the spokesman added.

Regarding health education for travellers, display of posters in departure and arrival halls, in-flight public announcements, environmental health inspection and provision of regular updates to the travel industry via meetings and correspondence are proceeding.

The spokesman advised travellers, especially those returning from avian influenza-affected areas and provinces with fever or respiratory symptoms, to immediately wear masks, seek medical attention and reveal their travel history to doctors. Healthcare professionals should pay special attention to patients who might have had contact with poultry, birds or their droppings in affected areas and provinces.

“We have enhanced publicity and health education to reinforce health advice on the prevention of avian influenza,” the spokesman said.

As of 4pm on April 11, the CHP’s hotline (2125 1111) for public enquiries has received 217 calls since the first confirmed human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) in Hong Kong.

Members of the public should remain vigilant and take heed of the preventive advice against avian influenza below:

* Do not visit live poultry markets and farms. Avoid contact with poultry, birds and their droppings. If contact has been made, thoroughly wash hands with soap;
* Avoid entering areas where poultry may be slaughtered and contact with surfaces which might be contaminated by droppings of poultry or other animals;
* Poultry and eggs should be thoroughly cooked before eating;
* Wash hands frequently with soap, especially before touching the mouth, nose or eyes, handling food or eating; after going to the toilet or touching public installations or equipment (including escalator handrails, elevator control panels and door knobs); or when hands are dirtied by respiratory secretions after coughing or sneezing;
* Cover the nose and mouth while sneezing or coughing, hold the spit with a tissue and put it into a covered dustbin;
* Avoid crowded places and contact with fever patients; and
* Wear masks when respiratory symptoms develop or when taking care of fever patients.

The public may visit the CHP’s avian influenza page (www.chp.gov.hk/en/view_content/24244.html) and website (www.chp.gov.hk/files/pdf/global_statistics_avian_influenza_e.pdf) for more information on avian influenza-affected areas and provinces.

Ends/Sunday, April 13, 2014
Issued at HKT 22:39

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The Yomiuri Shimbun

Workers involved in culling the chickens on Monday place a blue plastic tarpaulin over the ground where the chickens were to be buried.

8:27 pm, April 15, 2014

The Yomiuri Shimbun KUMAMOTO—The Kumamoto prefectural government has completed the culling of about 112,000 chickens after an outbreak of highly pathogenic H5 avian influenza at a poultry farm in Taragi, Kumamoto Prefecture, was confirmed Sunday. The chickens, which had been kept on two farms operated by the same owner in Taragi and Sagara in the prefecture, were placed into pits at the farms on Tuesday morning, according to the prefecture.

The prefectural government will also place feed and manure from the two farms in pits and bury them with the chickens as epidemic prevention measures on Wednesday.

Poultry houses at the farms will be disinfected as well.

The prefectural government is beefing up avian influenza countermeasures and trying to prevent an outbreak by such means as increasing the number of disinfection checkpoints.

The agriculture ministry on Monday announced that the source of the current avian influenza outbreak “is highly likely to have been spread by migratory birds.”

The prefectural government has set up 13 disinfection checkpoints for passing vehicles and will add four more disinfection checkpoints soon. The checkpoints are primarily used for vehicles driven by people involved in the livestock industry.

As of 10 a.m. Tuesday, the prefectural government had received no reports of suspected avian influenza cases beyond the Taragi farm case, according to the prefecture.

Recent cases…..

 

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Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

File:H1N1 versus H5N1 pathology.png

Different sites and outcomes of H1N1 versus H5N1 influenza infections. Based on Respiratory system.svg with annotations.
Author  :  TimVickers

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Biological Hazard Egypt Governorate of Beheira, Damanhur Damage level Details

 

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Biological Hazard in Egypt on Monday, 07 April, 2014 at 03:05 (03:05 AM) UTC.

Description
A(n) 86-year-old woman from the capital city of Damanhur in the Egyptian coastal governorate of Beheira is the latest human case of H5N1 avian influenza in the North African country, according to a EGYNews rport Saturday (computer translated). The report notes that the elderly woman is hospitalized in intensive care and is currently in “poor condition”. She also has the underlying condition of diabetes. She is being treated with Tamiflu. This human H5N1 avian flu case follows 2 confirmed cases 2 weeks ago (one case was from Damanhur also) Since 2006, Egypt has reported 175 (not including this current case) cases of human H5N1 bird flu with 63 deaths (Case fatality ratio – 36 percent).
Biohazard name: H5N1 (highly pathogenic avian influenza)
Biohazard level: 4/4 Hazardous
Biohazard desc.: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, H5N1(bird flu), Dengue hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic or unidentified diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 (P4) lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

 

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The Global Dispatch

Egypt reports third H5N1 avian influenza case of 2014

Image/CIA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A(n) 86-year-old woman from the capital city of Damanhur in the Egyptian coastal governorate of Beheira is the latest human case of H5N1 avian influenza in the North African country, according to a EGYNews rport Saturday (computer translated).

 

The report notes that the elderly woman is hospitalized in intensive care and is currently in “poor condition”.

She also has the underlying condition of diabetes. She is being treated with Tamiflu.

This human H5N1 avian flu case follows two confirmed cases two weeks ago (one case was from Damanhur also).

 

Read More Here

 

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Enhanced by ZemantaH5N1: Egypt reports third H5N1 case of 2014  

crofsblogs.typepad.com1 day ago

Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards


Image Source

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Biological Hazard Vietnam Province of Dong Nai, [Vinh Cuu District] Damage level Details

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RSOE EDIS

Biological Hazard in Vietnam on Tuesday, 11 March, 2014 at 11:20 (11:20 AM) UTC.

Description
A 19,000-bird village poultry flock in the south of the country has been hit by H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). The veterinary authority has sent Follow Up Report No.12 dated 10 March to the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). In Vinh Cuu in Dong Nai province in the south of the country, 5,000 village poultry died and 10,000 showed symptoms of HPAI on 9 March. The rest of the 19,200-bird flock was destroyed. The presence of the H5N1 subtype of the HPAI virus has been confirmed.
Biohazard name: H5N1 – Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus
Biohazard level: 4/4 Hazardous
Biohazard desc.: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, H5N1(bird flu), Dengue hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic or unidentified diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 (P4) lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

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Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

H7N9 infection is transmitted to humans by direct exposure to infected live or dead poultry or birds, or indirectly through exposure to environments contaminated by infected poultry or birds, such as in a farmyard or market setting. There is currently no evidence of sustained human-to-human transmission of the virus.

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February 12 2014 12:45 PM Biological Hazard Malaysia State of Sabah, Sandakan Damage level Details

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Biological Hazard in Malaysia on Wednesday, 12 February, 2014 at 12:45 (12:45 PM) UTC.

Description
The Ministry of Health in Malaysia (MOH) is reporting an imported case of H7N9 avian influenza in a 67-year-old female tourist to Sabah, according to a MOH press release dated Feb. 12 (computer translated). Investigations revealed that the case had received initial treatment in China for symptoms of fever , cough , runny nose , joint pain and fatigue begin January 30, 2014 , four (4) days before he arrived in Kuala Lumpur on February 3, 2014 . He left on February 4, 2014 and was in Sandakan until February 6, 2014 . Next , he went to Kota Kinabalu on February 6, 2014. On February 7, 2014 , the case is getting weaker and sought treatment at a private clinic before being referred to the district hospital . On the same day , the case was transferred to a private hospital at the request of family members. Screening tests were performed for the first sample suspected Avian Influenza A ( H7N9 ) on February 9, 2014 and the second confirmatory test samples tested positive on February 11, 2014 . Until now , the case is still receiving treatment at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU ) of the hospital and is in stable condition . Ministry of Health Malaysia has implemented control measures and reasonable precautions include improving the management of infection control in hospitals. Contact detection of 16 members of the group and 4 employees resorts that have close contact ( close contact) with all cases found to be in good health. Malaysia joins Taiwan and Hong Kong as countries with imported H7N9 avian influenza.
Biohazard name: H7N9 – Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus
Biohazard level: 4/4 Hazardous
Biohazard desc.: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, H5N1(bird flu), Dengue hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic or unidentified diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 (P4) lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

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MOH closely monitoring Malaysia’s H7N9 situation

H7N9 infection is transmitted to humans by direct exposure to infected live or dead poultry or birds, or indirectly through exposure to environments contaminated by infected poultry or birds, such as in a farmyard or market setting. There is currently no evidence of sustained human-to-human transmission of the virus.
Thursday, Feb 13, 2014
YourHealth, AsiaOne

SINGAPORE – The Ministry of Health (MOH) Singapore said it is in close contact with its Malaysian counterparts and is monitoring the situation following an annoucement by the Ministry of Health Malaysia of its first imported human case of avian influenza A/H7N9 in Kota Kinabalu.

A 67-year-old Chinese national who had travelled to Malaysia from Guangdong was tested positive for H7N9 after she complained of fever, cough, body aches and fatigue.

The Singapore Health Ministry said that the public health risk to Singapore remains low as the characteristics of H7N9 in human infections have not changed.

H7N9 infection is transmitted to humans by direct exposure to infected live or dead poultry or birds, or indirectly through exposure to environments contaminated by infected poultry or birds, such as in a farmyard or market setting. There is currently no evidence of sustained human-to-human transmission of the virus, MOH said.

In a media statement, the Health Ministry said that Singapore’s hospitals “remain vigilant to test for H7N9 and other avian influenza where clinically indicated, such as in patients with serious respiratory illness and a compatible travel history.”

“All suspected and confirmed cases will be isolated. In addition, if a case is detected, MOH will conduct contact tracing and all close contacts will be placed under surveillance.”

Health advisories have been put in place at Singapore’s border checkpoints for incoming travellers from areas affected by avian influenza, as well as for outgoing travellers to these affected areas.

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Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

H7N9

Johns Hopkins Medicine

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Biological Hazard China Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, Hong Kong Damage level Details

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Situation Update No. 12Posted:2013-12-03, 04:31:30 [UTC]

Ref.no.:BH-20131203-41836-CHN

Situation Update No. 12On 2014-01-15 at 04:14:21 [UTC]

Event: Biological Hazard

Location: Hong Kong Hong Kong Special Administrative Region China
Number of Dead: 2 person(s)

Number of Injured: 0 person(s)

Number of Evacuated: 0 person(s)

Number of Infected: 4 person(s)

Situation: Hong Kong’s Centre for Health Protection verified a human case of avian influenza A H7N9 on Thursday with China’s National Health and Family Planning Commission in a woman in Zhejiang. The 51-year-old patient’s case of avian flu was confirmed on Wednesday. She is receiving medical treatment in a Hangzhou hospital and was in serious condition as of Thursday. The CHP said it would follow up with Chinese health authorities to gain additional details. “Locally, enhanced disease surveillance, port health measures and health education against avian influenza are ongoing,” a spokesperson with Hong Kong’s Department of Health said. “We will remain vigilant and maintain liaison with the World Health Organization and relevant health authorities. Local surveillance activities will be modified upon the WHO’s recommendations.” To date, there were 152 confirmed human cases of avian influenza A H7N9 in China, including 53 cases in Zhejiang. Thirty-four cases occurred in
Shanghai, 29 in Jiangsu, 10 in Guangdong, six in Jiangxi, five in Fujian, four in Anhui, four in Henan, two in Beijing, two in Hunan, two in Shandong and one in Hebei. The DH in Hong Kong said it is taking precautions to ensure cases do not occur locally. “All boarder control points have implemented disease prevention and control measures,” the DH spokesperson said. “Thermal imaging systems are in place for body temperature checks of inbound travelers. Random temperature checks by handheld devices will also be arranged. Suspected cases will be immediately referred to public hospitals for follow-up investigation.”

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Hong Kong confirms case of avian flu in China

H7N9 Virus

H7N9 Virus

Hong Kong’s Centre for Health Protection verified a human case of avian influenza A H7N9 on Thursday with China’s National Health and Family Planning Commission in a woman in Zhejiang.

The 51-year-old patient’s case of avian flu was confirmed on Wednesday. She is receiving medical treatment in a Hangzhou hospital and was in serious condition as of Thursday. The CHP said it would follow up with Chinese health authorities to gain additional details.

“Locally, enhanced disease surveillance, port health measures and health education against avian influenza are ongoing,” a spokesperson with Hong Kong’s Department of Health said. “We will remain vigilant and maintain liaison with the World Health Organization and relevant health authorities. Local surveillance activities will be modified upon the WHO’s recommendations.

Read More Here

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EPIDEMICS


by Staff Writers
Hong Kong (AFP) Dec 26, 2013

A Hong Kong man infected with the H7N9 strain of bird flu died on Thursday, the first such death in the city since the virus emerged there this month.

The 80-year-old man was the second reported case of H7N9 infection in Hong Kong after one reported on December 2.

A government spokesman confirmed the death of the man, who had been suffering from other underlying medical conditions.

He had been taken to hospital after returning to Hong Kong from the neighbouring city of Shenzhen in mainland China, where he lives.

Hong Kong officials have stepped up border checks and traced hundreds who had been in contact with the two people infected.

Read More Here

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Man dies from H7N9 in Hong Kong

H7N9

H7N9

A Hong Kong man infected with the H7N9 strain of bird flu died on Thursday, the first such death in the city since the virus emerged there this month. The 80-year-old man was the second reported case of H7N9 infection in Hong Kong after one reported on December 2.

A government spokesman confirmed the death of the man, who had been suffering from other underlying medical conditions.

He had been taken to hospital after returning to Hong Kong from the neighbouring city of Shenzhen in mainland China, where he lives.

Hong Kong officials have stepped up border checks and traced hundreds who had been in contact with the two people infected.

The first case involved a 36-year-old Indonesian domestic helper who also had a history of travelling to Shenzhen.

Health officials had expected human cases of avian influenza in low winter temperatures, given the number of cases in mainland China.

In all, 138 human cases of H7N9 have been reported in mainland China since February with 45 deaths, according to the World Health Organisation.

Hong Kong is especially alert to the spread of viruses after an outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome swept through the city in 2003, killing 299 people and infecting around 1,800.

Voice of Russia, AFP

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Chinese health authorities today reported two more novel H7N9 infections from different parts of the country, including in a 3-year-old boy with mild illness who is hospitalized, according to media reports and an early notification from the World Health Organization (WHO).

The cases are the third and fourth to be reported since the middle of October and would boost China’s number of H7N9 infections to 139, which includes 45 deaths.

First case in Guangdong

The boy is hospitalized in Dongguan City in southern China’s Guangdong province, where he is in stable condition, Xinhua, China’s state news agency reported today. His infection was detected during routine hospital monitoring of flulike cases.

Donnguan is a large industrial city that borders Guangzhou, the provincial capital. The youngster’s illness is Guangdong’s second H7N9 case. The province’s first case was reported in early August, months after the virus was detected in poultry markets there.

Hong Kong’s Centre for Health Protection (CHP) said in a statement that the boy doesn’t have a fever and his flu-like symptoms are minor. All seven of the boy’s close contacts who were under close observation tested negative for the virus, though three had flu-like symptoms.

Second case in Zhejiang

Very few details were available about the second case-patient, who is from Zhejiang province. The first news of the detection came from WHO Twitter posts, which said China had notified it of two new lab-confirmed H7N9 cases in Guangdong and Zhejiang.

Gregory Hartl, a WHO spokesman, said in separate Twitter posts that the two H7N9 cases were reported from different parts of China on the same day. “Winter is starting,” he said.

In October Zhejiang province, located roughly 800 miles northeast of Guangdong, reported two H7N9 cases, in a 35-year-old man who was hospitalized in critical condition and in a 67-year-old farmer who had contact with live poultry and was also listed in critical condition.

Zhejiang is the Chinese province with the most H7N9 cases, with 49 infections and 11 deaths reported so far.

Wave of infections coming?

When the H7N9 virus was first detected China in March, the number of cases soared, then dropped sharply in May, with only two additional cases reported over the summer. Global health officials said poultry-market closures probably played a role in the declining number of cases, and there was a chance that the virus could burn itself out.

They said, however, that they expected sporadic cases to continue. And they warned that although flu viruses are unpredictable, there was a chance that the number of cases could start rising again as the Northern Hemisphere’s weather cools, a pattern seen with other avian influenza viruses such as H5N1.

 

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