Tag Archive: animal welfare


Global Community Report Banner photo FSPLogoGlobalCommunityFulloldworldmapbckgrnd_zps43d3059c.jpg

………………………………………………………………………………..

Eastern Daily Press

08:00 12 November 2015

Brian, who has three ears, is believed to be between four and ten years old.

Brian, who has three ears, is believed to be between four and ten years old.

We’ve all heard about cats having nine lives but have you heard the one about the cat with three ears?

Staff at a Norfolk rescue centre were equally perplexed when one intrepid feline arrived sporting an extra ear.

As Feline Care Cat Rescue in East Harling continue to care for the moggie, it is hoped its owner will now step forward. Brian, as he has been affectionately called, arrived at the centre on Monday after being caught in one of the centre’s traps after setting off security alarms at a nearby business.

Manager of the centre, Molly Farrar, said: “We expected it to be one of our own cats who’d been causing problems so this handsome, mature gentleman was quite a surprise to us.

“We’ve cared for plenty of cats with one eye, three legs or six toes and several cats with no tail left, but this is our first three-eared cat.

The centre is hoping that Brian has not been dumped but has simply got lost.

Miss Farrar, 38, said: “He’s obviously very distinctive with his extra little ear so someone must be missing him or recognise him.

“He’s in a bit of a tatty and skinny state. He’s been in the wars a bit and has a fractured canine tooth and ear mites so he obviously needs looking after.

 

Read More Here

Advertisements

Global Community Report Banner photo FSPLogoGlobalCommunityFulloldworldmapbckgrnd_zps43d3059c.jpg

…………………………………………………………………………….

 

 

“He is totally unaware of his limitations and disfigurement!”

The story Anne Graber heard was that Bjarni — the smiling dog with half a nose — was found roaming the streets by an animal control officer.

He had a family, but when they were contacted, they said they didn’t want him back. So Bjarni was brought to a local shelter.

This part Graber knows for sure: Shelter staff reached out to Graber, who is the founder of a Texas-based animal rescue group called St. Francis’ Angels, and asked her if she could help.

Graber immediately said that she’d make sure this dog was loved and made whole.

“He will remain with us until such time he has fully recovered and been adopted,” she says.

St. Francis’ Angels

Graber says this gorgeous boy is having a hard time eating and breathing, since what nose he has left is covering his sinus cavities.

But his personality is intact. He loves to play with other dogs. He loves to be around people. He loves, all around.

“Vivacious and engaging. He is totally unaware of his limitations and disfigurement,” Graber said. “He loves everything that moves.”

 

Read More Here

Enhanced by Zemanta

 

Amy Rossi

Philadelphia Animal Welfare Examiner

Cookie, waiting for a forever home
Cookie – The Forgotten Dog FB page

There is nothing wrong with Cookie, who was dumped at Yonkers Animal Shelter at just six months old and spent the next six years of her life there.

The only thing that is wrong is that she remained homeless all of these precious years instead of enjoying life as a loving family member.

Cookie, now seven, was lucky to land at Yonkers, where she was given all the time she needed to find her match. Unfortunately, the shelter admits to having very little foot traffic in Cookie’s younger years.

So there she sat, waiting. Safe, not urgent, and overlooked.

And there she remained, hoping the right person would come along to take her home.

 

Read More Here

Enhanced by Zemanta

 

 

 

Veterinarian's cruel admission
May 2, 2014

According to Thursday’s publication of the Star-Telegram, the Fort Worth, Texas, veterinarian who was arrested after being accused of keeping a dog alive for his blood, has admitted that there are more dogs who suffered the same fate.

Dr. Lou Tierce, 71, of the Camp Bowie Animal Clinic, told officials that there were actually five dogs who were kept alive at his clinic after their owners asked for them to be euthanized. Investigators found a virtual house of horrors inside of the clinic when they conducted a raid earlier this week.

Three dogs discovered inside of the facility earlier this week were in “such decrepit shape” that they had to be humanely euthanized. Investigators also found bugs, unsecured medications and exam rooms littered with trash, laundry and paperwork. One of the most disturbing finds was the doctor’s own dog, who was on an exam room floor – court documents state that the dog was missing a leg, had two dislocated shoulders and another dislocated leg.

 

Read More Here

 

…..

 

Veterinarian accused of keeping dog alive for blood surrenders to authorities

According to Thursday’s publication of the Star-Telegram, the Fort Worth, Texas, veterinarian who has been accused of keeping a dog alive in order to utilize the dog’s blood, has surrendered to the authorities.

Dr. Lou Tierce, 71, of the Camp Bowie Animal Clinic, surrendered at the Tarrant County Jail on Wednesday evening – he was arrested and then released after posting bail. An arrest warrant was issued for the veterinarian, for a charge of animal cruelty, after a couple came forward with a complaint accusing the doctor of telling them that their dog had been euthanized months ago, when the dog was actually being kept alive, supposedly in order for the clinic to utilize him for blood transfusions.

Dr. Tierce denies the allegations and he has pointed the finger of blame on a disgruntled former employee – the woman who quit and then told Jamie and Marian Harris that their dog, “Sid,” was not dead, but instead, very much alive inside of a cage at the vet clinic.

The couple managed to get inside of the veterinary hospital to retrieve their dog – they claim that another veterinarian later examined Sid and told them that the dog appeared to have been used repeatedly for blood transfusions. The Harrises have stated that they were advised by Dr. Tierce to have the dog euthanized because he was suffering from a degenerative spinal condition.

 

Read More Here

…..

Texas vet clinic accused of stealing dog, using him for blood transfusions

 

According to Tuesday’s WFAA News, a Fort Worth, Texas, veterinary clinic is being investigated because a couple claims that their dog, who was supposed to have been euthanized months ago, was being kept alive and used for blood transfusions.

Months ago, Jamie and Marian Harris claim that they had asked for their dog “Sid,” to be put down at the Camp Bowie Animal Clinic because they were told that the dog suffered from a degenerative spinal condition. On April 21, the couple learned that something was amiss when a veterinary technician, who had worked at the clinic, called them to let them know that Sid was still alive.

 

Read More Here

Enhanced by Zemanta
Harley and Teddy, "caped crusaders" raising awareness about puppy mills.
April 24, 2014

Those of us in the animal world are well aware of the atrocities of puppy mills.

The filthy conditions, lack of clean water, food, and veterinary care, the loneliness and neglect the animals suffer. Which is why it’s wonderful to hear of puppy mill dogs who are rescued and get to spend the rest of their lives in a loving home.

Two such survivors, Harley, 13, and Teddy, 8, are doing more than enjoying their freedom, however. On April 26, they’re leaving for a trip (not their first) with National Mill Dog Rescue (NMDR) to save other puppy mill dogs. This Midwest mission, dubbed ‘Harley to the Rescue,‘ has a goal of saving more than 50 dogs.

‘Harley to the Rescue’ started as a campaign to raise $2,500 to fund one rescue of 25-30 dogs. As of today, these brave Chihuhuas have raised over $150,000 and have rescued 265 dogs from mills. Watch video (Here).

 

Read More Here

Enhanced by Zemanta

Posted: 04/02/2014 9:55 am EDT Updated: 04/02/2014 5:59 pm EDT
ORGANIC EGGS
ASSOCIATED PRESS

 

When most Americans think about organic meat or eggs, they picture animals on small farms, allowed to root in the soil, feel sun on their backs, and engage in their natural behaviors. What they don’t picture is tens of thousands of hens crammed into massive sheds with no access to soil and extremely limited outdoor access.

Unfortunately, the USDA stamped its seal of approval on the latter scenario by refusing to implement its own advisory board’s animal welfare recommendations, which would have created a level playing field for the hundreds of small organic farms that were the basis for the standards. These recommendations would not have required “good” conditions, but they would have set a reasonable floor by requiring improvements from the five massive “organic” egg farms that provide the worst hen welfare.

The USDA’s decision doesn’t just violate our moral intuitions and the expectations of organic consumers; it also violates the Department’s legal mandate in at least two distinct ways.

First, USDA is statutorily required “to establish national [organic guidelines that] meet a consistent standard.” In 2005 and again in 2010, USDA’s Office of the Inspector General (OIG) found that animal welfare standards were applied inconsistently, in violation of the Act’s legal requirement that USDA ensure “that [organic] products meet consistent, uniform standards.”

By requiring improvements from the five mega-farms such that their hen welfare standards would align with that of the hundreds of smaller farms, adopting the advisory board’s recommendations would create this statutorily-mandated consistency. Ignoring those recommendations places USDA in violation of its legal mandate.

 

Read More Here

Enhanced by Zemanta

Restoring Faith In Humanity – Animal Edition 2014!

FRlKK FRlKK

Published on Feb 23, 2014

Leave a like,comment and share for more videos very soon!

Song – Steven Price – Gravity

Enhanced by Zemanta
Shelter Me
February 28, 2014

Cindy, a four-year-old pit bull, was taken in at the East Valley Animal Care and Control facility in Van Nuys, Calif., on Jan. 2.

Cindy’s intake photo reveals her fear and uncertainty…finding one’s self at an animal control facility is good cause for anxiety.

Nobody ever came to the facility to free Cindy – if she had an owner, that person failed to show.

In the time that Cindy has been at the facility, she has shown herself to be outgoing, playful and friendly.

According to Cindy’s profile on Shelter Me:

 

Read More Here

Enhanced by Zemanta

Animal Lovers Need Not Apply

Posted: 11/20/2013 4:52 pm

Director, No Kill Advocacy Center

2013-11-20-TheStoryofaLittleCat_Layout1_0001.jpg
Shelters are supposed to rescue animals from cruelty and neglect. They are supposed to be a sanctuary for lost dogs and stray cats. They are supposed to be a refuge, a safe haven for animals whose people can no longer keep them or no longer want them. Unfortunately, for too many animals, they are not.

Meet a little cat who was stuck inside a wall of a U.S. animal shelter, a cat who was stuck near the employee break room, where every employee could hear his cries while they sat and drank coffee, and ate lunch and socialized. They later told a newspaper reporter that they “pleaded” with shelter supervisors to do something about the cat. But neither they nor those supervisors did what compassion dictates. Not a single one of them took action. And because of that, the cat paid the ultimate price. This is how a local newspaper, the Dallas Observer, described it:

Before it starved to death last May, the cat could be heard by shelter workers, crying and clawing, trying to escape the confines of the break room wall behind which it had become trapped at Dallas Animal Services. Cats do especially badly in animal shelters, naturally preferring dark, quiet repose to loud, boisterous interaction. This cat, terrified, had jumped away from staffers who were trying to clean cages, going straight for a loose ceiling tile and bolting into darkness.
But somewhere in its search for safety, the cat fell between shelter walls and landed between the walls of the employee break room and the ladies’ restroom. It couldn’t move. It could only yowl and scratch. For more than a week.

Imagine it. Really try to imagine it. A shelter filled with employees whose job it is to care for animals. Imagine a cat calling out in panic and fear, stuck in a wall, where the employees are eating and talking and not a single one rescues the cat. Sure, one of them calls a cruelty investigator and he comes and determines that the cat is indeed stuck in the wall. But he doesn’t rescue the cat either. Others ask managers, each other, “Will someone rescue the cat?” But no one does. And they keep right on eating their lunches; they keep right on talking and doing those things that people do in break rooms. And meanwhile, the cats’ cries are getting more desperate, then weaker and then they finally stop. A short time later, the smell comes: the smell of a decomposing body.

And only then do they complain in earnest. How can we eat lunch in here, how can we socialize with that smell? And because it now affects them, they do something about it. They cut open a hole in the wall to remove the dead body, while every single one of us wants to scream: Why didn’t any of them tear open the wall when the cat was still alive? Don’t think for a second that this story is unique. There are many more. Moreover, these incidents are not just tragic in and of themselves, but they are set against the backdrop of the killing of roughly four million animals in shelters across the country every year.

Taken as a whole, these facts reveal a distinct pattern, an unpleasant but undeniable truth: willful abuse, careless neglect and even sadistic pleasure in causing animals to suffer and die are the status quo at many of our nation’s shelters. The question, of course, is why? How is it that agencies filled with people who are supposed to protect animals from harm and rescue them when they are in trouble, people who are paid to care for animals in need, are often abusive?

 

Read More Here

 

……….

Dallas taxpayers have every right to be pissed about the goings on at the city’s animal shelter.

By Andrea Grimes Thursday, Jan 20 2011

Before it starved to death last May, the cat could be heard by shelter workers, crying and clawing, trying to escape the confines of the break room wall behind which it had become trapped at Dallas Animal Services. Cats do especially badly in animal shelters, naturally preferring dark, quite repose to loud, boisterous interaction. This cat, terrified, had jumped away from staffers who were trying to clean cages, going straight for a loose ceiling tile and bolting into darkness.

But somewhere in its search for safety, the cat fell between shelter walls and landed between the walls of the employee break room and the ladies’ restroom. It couldn’t move. It could only yowl and scratch. For more than a week.

On May 3, according to court records, at least two shelter workers, after hearing the animal’s cries, notified animal cruelty investigator Domanick Munoz about the cat’s attempts to free itself. He e-mailed his bosses, including Tyrone McGill, a shelter manager. He explained that a cat was trapped in the wall, and where. Shelter workers could hear it clearly. And they had to get it out. Fast.

Lieutenant Scott Walton, interim division manager at Dallas Animal Services, has
demonstrated his “compassion” charge to shelter workers by fostering shelter
 kittens at home. He believes “responsible pet ownership,” including strict adherence to spay and neuter laws, will be the best
long-term solution for the shelter.

Mark Graham
Lieutenant Scott Walton, interim division manager at Dallas Animal Services, has demonstrated his “compassion” charge to shelter workers by fostering shelter kittens at home. He believes “responsible pet ownership,” including strict adherence to spay and neuter laws, will be the best long-term solution for the shelter.
The 2010 Humane Society audit of DAS found that cat keepers were "overwhelmed" by minimum daily responsibilities. Here, veterinary assistant Ameha Gebremichael checks on a kitten after an exam.

Mark Graham
The 2010 Humane Society audit of DAS found that cat keepers were “overwhelmed” by minimum daily responsibilities. Here, veterinary assistant Ameha Gebremichael checks on a kitten after an exam.

Details


Behind the Scenes at Dallas Animal Services

But the cat’s cries continued throughout the next day. Another worker, Kimberly Killebrew, told McGill about the trapped cat. McGill told her he’d “handle it,” according to an affidavit in the case. But the crying wore on. McGill just kept telling employees he’d take care of it.

Munoz was torn. He loved animals, and his job as a cruelty investigator allowed him to be on the front lines, saving them from horrible situations. But he also loved his family and couldn’t risk his job by going over his bosses’ heads and cutting the cat out of the wall. That just wasn’t the way things were done at Animal Services.

“If he had kicked that wall in, he’d have been fired,” says Arlington animal rights attorney Don Feare, whom Munoz retained. “[Munoz] had three small children to feed. He just had to deal with it.”

As the days went on, and the cat continued to claw at the wall, the shelter workers wondered when their supervisors were going to take action. According to the affidavit, the workers reported pleading with McGill: Couldn’t he do something?

Court records claim that McGill lifted a few ceiling tiles up, but did nothing more to save the cat. Calls were made to McGill’s supervisor, Kent Robertson, the shelter division manager and a former SPCA director who had been lauded by animal rights activists in the city for his dedication. But he was out of town, dealing with a family emergency.

More days elapsed and the cat stopped crying. That’s when the stink began. Not the stink made by shelter workers furious with supervisors, but the literal stink from the cat’s decomposing body. It was so bad that workers couldn’t eat their lunches in the break room.

On May 18—more than two weeks after the cat’s cries were first heard, McGill cut a square hole in the wall—about a foot across, in precisely the location Munoz had identified. After the day shift ended, McGill and a few other workers pulled the cat’s decomposed body out of the wall.

Animal deaths are nothing unusual at the shelter, which receives $6.6 million annually from the city’s general fund. Up to 26,000 dogs, eight or nine thousand cats and several hundred exotic animals, livestock and wildlife come through DAS each year. The smallest percentage of those—for example, 1,510 cats and 5,308 dogs for the last fiscal year—will be adopted, rescued or returned to their owners. The vast majority will be euthanized.

But imagine: animal services workers terrified of getting fired for attempting to save an animal’s life. Yet at Dallas Animal Services, that’s how things worked, say animal rights activists like Jonnie England and shelter employees such as Domanick Munoz, for whom the culture of intimidation at DAS became so bad he had to hire a lawyer after he blew the whistle on McGill. Even Humane Society of the United States auditors found that toeing the party line and maintaining the favor of supervisors often has taken precedence over animal care and safety.

According to a HSUS report released in November, DAS has been suffering from a “morale crisis.” Auditors reported that “staff repeatedly expressed alienation from managers and supervisors who used retaliatory disciplinary actions.” This, they surmised, was “reflective of ineffective leadership in the management ranks.”

Clock in, obey orders, keep your head down. Don’t question the bosses. Clock out. If a cat dies in the wall? Hope the press doesn’t get wind of it. And in the end, of course, it’s the animals who suffer most.

The past year has been disastrous for DAS: Once-lauded animal shelter division manager Kent Robertson resigned and shelter manager Tyrone McGill was indicted on felony animal cruelty charges, though his attorney, Anthony Lyons, adamantly denies his client did anything wrong. Two other employees were put on paid leave pending internal investigations into mistreatment of animals, and a cop—a cop!—was brought in to manage the department in anticipation of a damning audit by the Humane Society that was strikingly similar to the one it issued a decade earlier. Over the last 10 years, seemingly endless shake-ups in upper management and a new state-of-the-art animal shelter costing taxpayers millions can’t seem to set DAS straight.

 

Read More Here

 

Read further: A Liveblog During The Animal Shelter Commission Meeting

Paid Leave for Being Indicted on Animal Cruelty Charges

Maybe With Their Powers Combined, Dallas Animal Services Can Be Compassionate

……….

Enhanced by Zemanta