Category: Hazmat


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California Has a Huge Gas Leak, and Crews Can’t Stop It Yet

Sarah Zhang 
Crews from SoCalGas and outside experts work on a relief well at the Aliso Canyon facility above the Porter Ranch area of Los Angeles, on December 9, 2015.
© Dean Musgrove/Los Angeles Daily News/AP/Pool Crews from SoCalGas and outside experts work on a relief well at the Aliso Canyon facility above the Porter Ranch area of Los Angeles, on December 9, 2015.
While the world was hammering out a historic agreement to curb carbon emissions—urged along by California, no less—the state was dealing with an embarrassing belch of its own. Methane, a greenhouse gas 70 times more potent than carbon dioxide, has been leaking out of a natural gas storage site in southern California for nearly two months, and a fix won’t arrive until spring.

The site is leaking up to 145,000 pounds per hour, according to the California Air Resources Board. In just the first month, that’s added up to 80,000 tons, or about a quarter of the state’s ordinary methane emissions over the same period. The Federal Aviation Administration recently banned low-flying planes from flying over the site, since engines plus combustible gas equals kaboom.

Steve Bohlen, who until recently was state oil and gas supervisor, can’t remember the last time California had to deal with a gas leak this big. “I asked this question of our staff of 30 years,” says Bohlen. “This is unique in the last three or four decades. This is an unusual event, period.”

Families living downwind of the site have also noticed the leak—boy, have they noticed. Methane itself is odorless, but the mercaptan added to natural gas gives it a characteristic sulfurous smell. Over 700 households have at least temporarily relocated, and one family has filed a lawsuit against the Southern California Gas Company alleging health problems from the gas. The gas levels are too low for long-term health effects, according to health officials, but the odor is hard to ignore.

Given both the local and global effects of the gas leak, why is it taking so long to stop? The answer has to do with the site at Aliso Canyon, an abandoned oil field. Yes, that’s right, natural gas is stored underground in old oil fields. It’s common practice in the US, but largely unique to this country. The idea goes that geological sites that were good at keeping in oil for millions of years would also be good at keeping in gas.

 

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HAZMAT in India on December 11 2015 04.24 AM UTC

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Base data

EDIS Number HZ-20151211-51206-IND
Event type HAZMAT
Date/Time December 11 2015 04:24 AM (UTC)
Last update December 11 2015 04:25 AM (UTC)
Cause of event
Damage level Medium Damage level

Geographic information

Continent Asia
Country India
County / State State of Gujarat
Area Shree Ganesh Remedies Company
Settlement Ankleshwar
Coordinate 21° 37.585,73° 0.912

Number of affected people / Humanities loss

Dead person(s) 3
Injured person(s) 2

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Three workers of a chemical manufacturing company were killed on the spot and two others are reported critical after inhaling a poisonous gas in a factory premises in the industrial area of Ankleshwar town Thursday morning, police said. The gas leakage occurred in a scrubber tank (storage tank) of Shree Ganesh Remedies Company, which produces pharmaceutical ingredients and pigments, at Ankleshwar GIDC on Thursday morning. The Gujarat Pollution Control Board (GPCB) officials rushed to the spot after learning about the incident and have started probe. Five labourers were working near the scrubber tank containing sodium bromide and hydro chloric acid gas, meant to carry out chemical tests. The accident occurred when the labourers were changing the bottom pipes in the tank. They inhaled the toxic gas emanated from the tanker’s chamber and became unconscious. sources said. The incident came into light when the night shift in-charge, made a routine check-up of the plant. On finding five labourers lying down and the gas leak, he immediately stopped the process going on in the chamber and also alerted the factory owner C M Kothiya, who is also vice-president of Ankleshwar Industrial Association. All the affected labourers were immediately rushed to A K Patel Hospital in Ankleshwar. While three of the labourers were declared brought dead by the doctors, the condition of two others are reported to be critical. The deceased have been identified as Raja Yadav (26), Satyendra Yadav (22), Raju Prajapati (24), all residents of Ankleshwar, while two others under critical situation are identified as Kiran Chuahan and Suresh Maurya. The GPCB officials, along with District Industrial Safety and Health officials, and police reached the spot after learning about the incident and started probe into it. The GPCB officials also collected samples from the scrubber tank for lab test. “We have lodged a complaint in this regard and started investigation as to how the gas leaked. We have also informed government officials concerned about the incident,” said Inspector P L Chaudhari. GPCB regional officer A V Shah said, “At present it is difficult to say anything, but we suspect that due to the leakage of sodium bromide gas and hydrochloric acid gas, the casualties had taken place. We have started probe to find out more into the incident. Production in the factory has been stopped.” This is the second such incident in this industrial hub in the recent past. On Monday, two workers had died while handling chemical waste at the premises of a company.

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The Indian Express

Gujarat: Gas leak kills 3 workers at Ankleshwar pharmaceutical factory, two critical

Five labourers were working near the scrubber tank containing sodium bromide and hydro chloric acid gas, meant to carry out chemical tests.

By: Express News Service | Surat | Published:December 11, 2015 3:46 am

Three workers of a chemical manufacturing company were killed on the spot and two others are reported critical after inhaling a poisonous gas in a factory premises in the industrial area of Ankleshwar town Thursday morning, police said.

The gas leakage occurred in a scrubber tank (storage tank) of Shree Ganesh Remedies Company, which produces pharmaceutical ingredients and pigments, at Ankleshwar GIDC on Thursday morning. The Gujarat Pollution Control Board (GPCB) officials rushed to the spot after learning about the incident and have started probe.

Five labourers were working near the scrubber tank containing sodium bromide and hydro chloric acid gas, meant to carry out chemical tests. The accident occurred when the labourers were changing the bottom pipes in the tank. They inhaled the toxic gas emanated from the tanker’s chamber and became unconscious. sources said.

 

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‘Fukushima Fingerprint’: Highest-Yet Radiation Levels Found Off US Coast

‘The changing values underscore the need to more closely monitor contamination levels across the Pacific.’

Scientists test seawater samples off the coast of Japan near the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station. (Photo: IAEA Imagebank/flickr/cc)

Radiation from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan has been detected at an increased number of sites off U.S. shores, including the highest level in the area detected to date, scientists announced Thursday.

While the levels are still too low to be considered a threat to human or marine life by the government’s standards, tests of hundreds of samples of Pacific Ocean water reveal that the Fukushima Daiichi plant has continued to leak radioactive isotopes more than four years after the meltdown—and must not be dismissed, according to Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) marine radiochemist Ken Buesseler.

“Despite the fact that the levels of contamination off our shores remain well below government-established safety limits for human health or to marine life, the changing values underscore the need to more closely monitor contamination levels across the Pacific,” Buesseler said Thursday. “[F]inding values that are still elevated off Fukushima confirms that there is continued release from the plant.”

Scientists from the WHOI and Buesseler’s citizen-science project Our Radioactive Ocean discovered trace amounts of cesium-134, the “fingerprint” of Fukushima, in 110 new Pacific samples off U.S. shores in 2015 alone.

The isotope is unique to Fukushima and has a relatively short two-year half life, which means “the only source of this cesium-134 in the Pacific today is from Fukushima,” Buesseler said.

Map shows the location of seawater samples taken by scientists and citizen scientists that were analyzed at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution for radioactive cesium as part of Our Radioactive Ocean. Cesium-137 is found throughout the Pacific Ocean and was detectable in all samples collected, while cesium-134 (yellow/orange dots), an indicator of contamination from Fukushima, has been observed offshore and in select coastal areas. (Figure by Jessica Drysdale, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)Map shows the location of seawater samples taken by scientists and citizen scientists that were analyzed at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution for radioactive cesium as part of Our Radioactive Ocean. Cesium-137 is found throughout the Pacific Ocean and was detectable in all samples collected, while cesium-134 (yellow/orange dots), an indicator of contamination from Fukushima, has been observed offshore and in select coastal areas. (Figure by Jessica Drysdale, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

One sample collected roughly 1,600 miles west of San Francisco revealed the highest radiation level detected to date off the West Coast, the researchers said in a post on the project’s website. “[In] one cubic meter of seawater (about 264 gallons), 11 radioactive decay events per second can be attributed to cesium atoms of both isotopes. That is 50 percent higher than we’ve seen before.”

“[T]hese long-lived radioisotopes will serve as markers for years to come for scientists studying ocean currents and mixing in coastal and offshore waters,” Buesseler continued.

The 2011 accident, prompted by an earthquake and tsunami off Japan’s east coast, was the world’s worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl in 1986 and resulted in the near-total meltdown of three nuclear reactors at the Fukushima plant and a mass evacuation of the prefecture. Despite ongoing warnings about long-term health and environmental impacts and widespread opposition to nuclear power in the wake of the meltdown, Japan in August restarted a reactor at the Sendai power plant, about 620 miles southwest of Tokyo.

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Posted: Nov 03, 2015 5:15 PM CST Updated: Nov 03, 2015 5:39 PM CST

ST. PETERS, Mo. (KMOV.com) – Residents in St. Charles County are familiar with seeing trains. Locomotives roll through the county several times a day, but a topic under discussion involving the Westlake Landfill has some on edge.

If a decision is made to remove radioactive waste from Westlake, railways could end up transporting it. A derailment is always a risk near any set of tracks, but if train carrying radioactive waste is the one that derails, it could be a catastrophe.

“Basically, what we want is to have the trains run at a slower speed coming through the towns,” said St. Peters Alderman Rock Reitmeyer. “We don’t want to see any accidents coming through our area and dropping all this waste. It could have a hazardous effect.”

 

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The Star

East end given iodine pills as nuclear disaster precaution

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JasonParis from Toronto, CanadaFrenchman’s Bay (Pickering – Bay Ridges)     Wikimedia.org

Residents and businesses within 10 kms of the the Pickering and Darlington Nuclear Generating Stations will receive potassium iodide pills, meant to protect in case of the nuclear disaster.

If you live in Durham Region or Scarborough, you may have just been mailed a package of pills in a calming sky blue box. Those pills are meant to protect you in the event of a nuclear disaster — a disaster that you, living within a sensitive 10km zone surrounding the Pickering and Darlington Nuclear Generating Stations, would be on the frontlines of.

“A serious nuclear accident is extremely unlikely,” says Ontario Power Generation (OPG) spokesperson Neal Kelly.

“(But) we worked with Toronto Health and Durham Health and we came up with a plan.”

200,000 homes and businesses have just received potassium iodide (KI) pills in a $1.5 million OPG-funded project that is being run in conjunction with Durham Region and the City of Toronto. Also known as RadBlock, the pills prevent the thyroid gland from absorbing radioactive iodine, thus reducing the risk of thyroid cancer in the aftermath of a nuclear disaster. As a gas, radioactive iodine can travel quickly and is easily inhaled.

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Darlington_Nuclear_GS.jpg: Jason Spaceman derivative work: — Felix König  ……….Wikimedia.org

“It’s for one thing and one thing only — and that’s to reduce the risk of thyroid cancer,” Ken Gorman, Durham Region’s director of environmental health, says of the pills. The pills are not blanket anti-radiation medication, Gorman adds, and they should only be taken as directed immediately after a radioactive release.

“Radioactive iodine would only be one of the radioactive elements that could be released during an emergency-type situation.”

In 2014, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) ordered OPG to distribute the pills for free to everyone living and working within the nuclear plants’ 10 km “primary zones” by the end of 2015. In Toronto, that means pretty much everyone who lives east of Morningside Ave. Previously, the pills were available at local pharmacies, but few residents bothered to pick them up.

 

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NaturalNews
EPA

(NaturalNews) A five-year fire is burning beneath a landfill in a St. Louis suburb, and it’s rapidly approaching an old cache of nuclear waste.

At present, St. Louis County emergency officials are unsure whether or not the fire will set off a reaction that releases a radioactive plume over the city. An emergency plan was put together in October 2014 to “save lives in the event of a catastrophic event at the West Lake Landfill.”

St. Louis County officials warn, “There is a potential for radioactive fallout to be released in the smoke plume and spread throughout the region.”

Many residents are taking precautions; some are buying gas masks, while others are considering moving away. Just recently, over 500 local residents discussed the precarious situation at a church meeting which usually draws in less than 50 people.

EPA not worried about the fire or the nuclear waste

Nothing stands in the way of the uncontrollable landfill fire, which is smoldering hot underneath the trash of the West Lake Landfill of Bridgeton County, St. Louis. This “smoldering event” is not uncommon. Fires ignite and smolder under landfills because the trash becomes so compact and hot. In this case, the fire is brewing less than a quarter mile from an old deposit of nuclear waste that threatens to spread cancer-causing radon gas.

Surprisingly, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) isn’t taking the situation very seriously.

EPA officials admit that although the waste may eventually emit radon gas, it won’t affect anything outside the landfill property. This is the same EPA that polluted the Colorado River with 3 million gallons of toxic sludge full of lead, arsenic and other heavy metals. EPA contractors breached a mine, sending the sludge flowing into the Animas river, which quickly turned putrid and murky. That pollution has now spread to New Mexico, Utah and Arizona, infiltrating the countryside with toxic elements. Why should anyone in St. Louis County trust the EPA with radioactive waste?

To make matters worse, the EPA isn’t even worried about the fire reaching the nuclear waste. “We just do not agree with the finding that the subsurface smoldering event is approaching the radiologically impacted material,” said Mary Peterson, director of the Superfund division for EPA Region 7.

There have been no plans to remove the radioactive waste as of yet, leaving local residents baffled and worried. Most residents were unaware of the existence of the radioactive waste, which had been dumped there illegally four decades ago. If it weren’t for activists educating the public about the waste, no one would know.

Radioactive waste comes back to haunt St. Louis

The radioactive waste includes 8,700 tons of leached barium sulfate residue. It was illegally dumped in the West Lake Landfill by Cotter Corporation sometime after World War II and wasn’t discovered by investigators until 1973. The radioactive waste was left behind due to the mishandling of uranium by Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, a company that started out working for the federal government’s Manhattan Project.

Since 1990, the West Lake Landfill has been managed by the EPA and deemed a Superfund site. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry recently warned all agencies not to disturb the surface of the landfill. They warned that radium-226, radon-222 and radium-228 could be released into the air, putting people near the landfill at risk.

The agency reported that radon levels in the area are often measured above regulations “by as much as 10 to 25 times at individual surface test locations.” Moreover, radium increases people’s risk of developing bone, liver and breast cancer.

The EPA is downplaying the potential for a Chernobyl or Fukushima-like disaster, but residents have every reason not to trust the agency’s guesswork, given its decades-long refusal to safely remove the radioactive material from the area.

Sources:

LATimes.com

Collapse.news

STLToday.com

WashingtonTimes.com

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About NaturalNews

The NaturalNews Network is a non-profit collection of public education websites covering topics that empower individuals to make positive changes in their health, environmental sensitivity, consumer choices and informed skepticism. The NaturalNews Network is owned and operated by Truth Publishing International, Ltd., a Taiwan corporation. It is not recognized as a 501(c)3 non-profit in the United States, but it operates without a profit incentive, and its key writer, Mike Adams, receives absolutely no payment for his time, articles or books other than reimbursement for items purchased in order to conduct product reviews.

The vast majority of our content is freely given away at no charge. We offer thousands of articles and dozens of downloadable reports and guides (like the Honest Food Guide) that are designed to educate and empower individuals, families and communities so that they may experience improved health, awareness and life fulfillment.

Learn More About Natural News Here

 

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stl today.com

Residents demand answers about radioactive Bridgeton landfill

October 15, 2015 10:45 pm  • 

Tonya Mason, who works just feet away from the fence line of Republic Services’ landfill in Bridgeton, expresses anger that the air from burning underground material has never been tested for contaminants on Thursday, Oct. 15, 2015 at a meeting by Just Moms at John Calvin Presbyterian Church. Hundreds of people gathered to hear about the ongoing problems at the site. Photo by Christian Gooden, cgooden@post-dispatch.com

More than 40 years ago, radioactive waste was dumped at the West Lake Landfill in Bridgeton. The decades since have been filled with legal and political moves that have not gotten the site cleaned up.

Now a growing number of residents want to know how dangerous it is to live and work in the area as a fire burns underground in the adjoining Bridgeton Landfill. More than 500 people showed up at a Bridgeton church on Thursday for a meeting organized by residents. The monthly meetings held for the last two years typically attract no more than 50.

The surge in public interest comes after state reports showed the fire is moving toward the nuclear waste, and radioactive materials can be found in soil, groundwater and trees outside the perimeter of the landfill.

At least six school districts have sent letters home in the last week outlining their plans for a potential nuclear emergency. St. Louis County recently released its own emergency evacuation plan that was written last year.

Underground fires are common in landfills as buried garbage can get hot, much like the bottom of a compost pile. Typically they are monitored and allowed to burn out. But none of the fires have gotten so close to nuclear waste, which was created during the World War II era for St. Louis’ part in the production of the atomic bomb.

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HAZMAT USA State of California, Palo Alto [El Camino Real] Damage level Details

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HAZMAT in USA on Friday, 30 October, 2015 at 11:43 (11:43 AM) UTC.

Description
An “unknown odor” that caused respiratory irritation for several guests prompted a hazardous materials response at the Westin hotel Thursday night, according to the Palo Alto Fire Department. The odor, which appeared to emanate from an underground garage area, was first reported to authorities at 9:09 p.m. at the hotel on El Camino Real east of University Avenue. Fire officials said a dozen people were “decontaminated and transported” to the emergency rooms at Stanford Hospital and El Camino Hospital in Mountain View. None of the ailments appear to be serious or life-threatening. Other hotel guests were ordered to shelter in place as a precaution. Palo Alto Deputy Fire Chief Catherine Capriles said the source of the odor was not immediately clear after an initial foray into the garage by hazmat crews from Palo Alto Fire and the Mountain View Fire Department. She said pool cleaning equipment was found, but intact and unlikely the source. After a second search still did not find a culprit, the hazmat crews dispersed. While the source of the odor was not known, as of midnight Friday, officials were confident that it had “vented and dissipated” and posed no additional risk.

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Palo Alto: 12 at Westin hotel sickened by ‘unknown odor,’ cause still a mystery

Posted:   10/29/2015 10:54:21 PM PDT   Updated:   about 11 hours ago
Palo Alto firefighters responded to a report of hazmat situation at the Westin Palo Alto Oct. 29, 2015 in Palo Alto, Calif. (KGO-TV )

Palo Alto firefighters responded to a report of hazmat situation at the Westin Palo Alto Oct. 29, 2015 in Palo Alto, Calif. (KGO-TV )

PALO ALTO — An “unknown odor” that caused respiratory irritation for 12 people prompted a hazardous materials response at the Westin hotel, according to the Palo Alto Fire Department.

The chemical odor, which appeared to emanate from an underground garage area, was first reported to authorities at 9:09 p.m. Thursday at the hotel on El Camino Real east of University Avenue.

Fire officials said a dozen people were “decontaminated and transported” to the emergency rooms at Stanford Hospital and El Camino Hospital in Mountain View. None of the ailments appeared to be serious or life threatening.

Other hotel guests were ordered to shelter in place as a precaution.

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(WFSB photo) (WFSB photo)
WATERBURY, CT (WFSB) –

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Environment Pollution USA State of Connecticut, Waterbury Damage level Details

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Environment Pollution in USA on Tuesday, 20 October, 2015 at 03:29 (03:29 AM) UTC.

Description
Department of Energy and Environmental Protection crews were on the scene of a Waterbury oil spill Monday, as 500 gallons of fuel spilled into the basement of the Exchange Place Towers on Center Street. This impacted a sump pump that discharged to the catch basin network. The catch basin network discharges to Great Brook which is tributary to the Naugatuck River. DEEP officials say an additional estimated 100 gallons of fuel reached the surface waters. Crews were able to contain most of the 100 gallons near where the brook meets the river. A contractor has been hired to assist in the cleanup of both the basement and surface water. No word on how long the cleanup process will take.

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Cleanup crews to return to oil spill site in Waterbury

Posted: Oct 20, 2015 6:19 AM CST Updated: Oct 20, 2015 6:19 AM CST

(WFSB photo) (WFSB photo)

WATERBURY, CT (WFSB) – A near environmental disaster continued to be cleaned up in downtown Waterbury Tuesday.

More than 1,500 gallons of heating oil spilled in the basement of an apartment building on Center Street on Monday afternoon.

The Department of Energy and Environmental Protection then said a sump pump flushed hundreds of gallons of the fuel into the Naugatuck River, putting wildlife in danger.

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DEEP crews work to contain oil spill at Waterbury brook, building

An estimated 500 gallons of fuel spilled out into the basement of a Waterbury building with about 100 gallons spilling out into a nearby body of water on Monday.

Members of the emergency response unit from the Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection were called to an oil spill at the Exchange Place Towers, which is located at 44 Center St. DEEP said the leak started in the basement.

Continue reading >>

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Hazmat Spill Reported at Port of Baltimore

Baltimore emergency management officials reported the hazmat spill occurred Tuesday.
Hazmat Spill Reported at Port of Baltimore
Photo Credit: Baltimore Office of Emergency Management.

 

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HAZMAT USA State of Maryland, Baltimore [Port of Baltimore] Damage level Details

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HAZMAT in USA on Wednesday, 14 October, 2015 at 03:43 (03:43 AM) UTC.

Description
First responders came by land and by sea when a hazardous material spilled at the Port of Baltimore Tuesday, according to the Baltimore Office of Emergency Management. Fire boats were deployed to the port, where fire trucks, the U.S. Coast Guard and Maryland Department of the Environment had also responded, the office of emergency management reported at approximately noon Tuesday. There was no health risk due to the hazmat spill, according to the report.

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HAZMAT USA State of New Mexico, Los Alamos [Los Alamos National Lab] Damage level Details

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HAZMAT in USA on Wednesday, 14 October, 2015 at 03:19 (03:19 AM) UTC.

Description
Not a very smart thief, stealing lab tools contaminated with radiation from Los Alamos National Laboratory. Investigators believe a LANL contractor might have done just that, and put the public at risk in what is just the latest problem with theft at the high security lab. Los Alamos Police are calling the man a “person of interest,” but not a suspect. Richard Atencio, an employee of Compra Industries, had total access to LANL’s Technical Area-54, which is a radioactive waste storage area. The incident started as a theft, but quickly turned into a full-on HAZMAT situation last month. According to a search warrant, on September 29, a witness saw a man in a brown shirt throwing things out of the trunk of a Honda Accord into bushes on LANL grounds. The man was tossing the things across the way from TA-54, where items have been reported missing over the past year. Los Alamos Police came out to the scene of the dump and found a laundry list of stuff. One of the items, a band saw, had “TA-54” on it, meaning it was likely contaminated. Turns out, it was, along with a pair of gloves and a bag. Police tracked down Richard Atencio, who was wearing a brown shirt and owns a Honda Accord. When officers searched Atencio’s Accord, they noticed his trunk carpet was missing. A HAZMAT sweep of his car found radiation levels on Atencio’s steering wheel, gear shift and passenger door. The FBI then searched Atencio’s Española home on October 9, suspecting he might have contaminated his own stuff. No LANL property or radioactive items were found. Atencio has not yet been charged with anything. LANL didn’t comment on the thefts; the company that Atencio works for, Compra Industries, didn’t get back to KRQE News 13. The search warrant also revealed a disturbing fact, that there have been 76 reported cases of theft of LANL property by LANL employees in the last year.

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13 October 2015 Tuesday 16:10

Thief steals radioactive items from Los Alamos National Lab

LOS ALAMOS, N.M. (KRQE) –Investigators believe a LANL contractor might have done just that, and put the public at risk in what is just the latest problem with theft at the high security lab.

Thief steals radioactive items from Los Alamos National Lab

Not a very smart thief, stealing lab tools contaminated with radiation from Los Alamos National Laboratory.LOS ALAMOS, N.M.

Investigators believe a LANL contractor might have done just that, and put the public at risk in what is just the latest problem with theft at the high security lab.

Los Alamos Police are calling the man a “person of interest,” but not a suspect.

Richard Atencio, an employee of Compra Industries, had total access to LANL’s Technical Area-54, which is a radioactive waste storage area.

The incident started as a theft, but quickly turned into a full-on HAZMAT situation last month.

According to a search warrant, on September 29, a witness saw a man in a brown shirt throwing things out of the trunk of a Honda Accord into bushes on LANL grounds. The man was tossing the things across the way from TA-54, where items have been reported missing over the past year.

Los Alamos Police came out to the scene of the dump and found a laundry list of stuff. One of the items, a band saw, had “TA-54” on it, meaning it was likely contaminated. Turns out, it was, along with a pair of gloves and a bag.

 

Read More Here

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