Category: mudslides


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The Oregonian

Sinkholes, slides endanger entire neighborhood in Tillamook

By Laura Gunderson | The Oregonian/OregonLive
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on December 13, 2015 at 7:00 AM, updated December 13, 2015 at 7:01 AM

Seven families in a cluster of hillside homes above the Tillamook River spent the past week watching the two roads they live on slip, buckle and tangle into a slide of rocks, mud and trees.

It began Monday as a few little cracks on Burton Hill Road, just outside Tillamook. By Wednesday the cracks had collapsed into a quarter-mile series of sinkholes and creeping mud that put three homes at risk, pushed a barn off its foundation and left homeowners fearful of what will move next.

As the rains continue, they say only one thing is clear:

No one is coming to the rescue.

Morgan Kottre, 27, said she and her neighbors – some of them relatives – have been told by county, state and federal officials that they don’t qualify for assistance because Burton Hill Road and the lower Hillside Drive are private roads on private land. Same story from at least one insurance company. Kottre said a representative told one family the devastation qualifies as an “act of god,” which the insurer doesn’t cover.

“In theory, we could try to fight it,” she said, “but right now we’re just trying to fight the land.”

Storms over the past week that have brought flooding and landslides across northwestern Oregon. On Saturday afternoon, blizzard conditions closed three highways in Southern Oregon. The extreme weather has caused at least two deaths in Oregon and federal officials set early damage estimates at about $15 million.

Tillamook County was among the 13 counties where Oregon Gov. Kate Brown declared a state of emergency. In fact, not far from Kottre’s home on Saturday night, the town of Oceanside was cut off as the only road out of town was closed due to a failed culvert.

 

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The Express Tribune

 

Indonesian landslide buries 18 villagers

By AFP
Published: December 3, 2015
A rescue team searches for survivors and remove bodies after a landslide at Jemblung village in Banjarnegara, central Java province, on December 13, 2014. PHOTO: AFP

A rescue team searches for survivors and remove bodies after a landslide at Jemblung village in Banjarnegara, central Java province, on December 13, 2014. PHOTO: AFP

JAKARTA: A landslide triggered by torrential rains on Thursday engulfed a village in western Indonesia, burying 18 people, an official said.

Three have been found dead and rescuers are searching for the bodies of 15 others after the landslide hit the village of Lebong Tandai on Sumatra island, a hilly area known for gold mining.

Several houses were buried when mounds of earth and rocks surged down a hillside in the early hours, said disaster agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho.

 

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Asia One

Floods, landslides hit West, North Sumatra, cut off access

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Photo: Reuters

Torrential rain has caused landslides in parts of West and North Sumatra, cutting off access and disrupting economic activity.

A 150-meter stretch of the highway connecting West Sumatra and Riau in Jorong Sopang, Pangkalan Koto Baru, Limapuluh Kota regency, was engulfed by up to a meter of floodwater on Sunday at 5 a.m. local time.

Limapuluh Kota Disaster Mitigation Agency (BPBD) head Nasriyanto said the flooding was triggered by the overflowing Batang Manggilang River.

“Only large trucks were able to pass, resulting in other vehicles from Pekanbaru and Payakumbuh backing up 2 kilometers for eight hours,” Nasriyanto told The Jakarta Post on Sunday.

He said the heavy rain that had drenched the region in the past three days had triggered floods and landslides in a number of locations in the regency. At least 500 homes were engulfed by over 50 centimeters of floodwater and eight homes were reportedly damaged by a landslide on Sunday morning.

 

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Eyewitness News

Major increase in weather disasters over last 2 decades

Since 1995, weather disasters have killed millions of people & left billions injured & homeless.

A flood-affected resident swims through floodwaters in Kalay, upper Myanmar’s Sagaing region on August 3, 2015. Relentless monsoon rains have triggered flash floods and landslides, destroying thousands of houses, farmland, bridges and roads with fast-flowing waters hampering relief efforts. Picture: AFP.

 

GENEVA – Weather-related disasters such as floods and heatwaves have occurred almost daily in the past decade, almost twice as often as two decades ago, with Asia being the hardest hit region, a UN report said on Monday.

While the report authors could not pin the increase wholly on climate change, they did say that the upward trend was likely to continue as extreme weather events increased.

Since 1995, weather disasters have killed millions of people, left billions injured, homeless or in need of aid, and accounted for 90 percent of all disasters, it said.

A recent peak year was 2002, when drought in India hit 200 million and a sandstorm in China affected 100 million.

But the standout mega-disaster was Cyclone Nargis, which killed 138,000 in Myanmar in 2008.

 

 

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A man crosses a flooded road in Sta Rosa, Nueva Ecija, one of the provinces hardest hit by Typhoon Koppu, Oct. 19, 2015. Koppu has weakened to a tropical storm, but authorities warn flooding may continue as water comes down from higher elevations. Reuters

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October 17 2015 11:36 AM Tropical Storm Philippines Multiple areas, [Island of Luzon] Damage level Details

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Tropical Storm in Philippines on Saturday, 17 October, 2015 at 11:36 (11:36 AM) UTC.

Description
Disaster officials advised communities in flood-prone areas of the northern Philippines to evacuate Saturday as the slow-moving Typhoon Koppu bore down on the coast with heavy rains and high winds. Heavy rains are expected to inundate many areas on the main northern island of Luzon even before the typhoon makes landfall early Sunday, and 24 hours thereafter, acting weather bureau chief Esperanza Cayanan said. Cayanan said that another typhoon farther east and a high pressure area north of the country will hold Koppu in a “semi-stationary” position and shroud most of Luzon with an enormous band of thick rain clouds. President Benigno Aquino appeared on national television to warn Filipinos about the typhoon and appealed for cooperation to prevent casualties. The typhoon was packing sustained winds of 160 kilometers per hour (100 mph) and gusts of up to 190 kph (119 mph) early Saturday about 300 kilometers (188 miles) east of Aurora, one of two provinces where it is forecast to come ashore. Forecasters expected sustained winds will reach 185 kph (116 mph) before it hits land. “We are looking at the possible worst scenario, not to scare but to allow us to prepare,” Cayanan said. “If it stays 24 hours … and the downpour is sustained, we will surely have floods and landslides.” She said the typhoon’s cloud band is about 600 kilometers (375 miles) across, unleashing the most intense rain close to the center. “Your government is here in order to ensure that we will meet our goal of zero casualties,” Aquino said Friday. “But I must emphasize (that) each local government unit, community, and Filipino that will be affected has the duty to cooperate … to overcome the challenges ahead.” It was the first time Aquino has personally issued a storm warning on television since super Typhoon Haiyan barreled through the central Philippines in November 2013, leaving more than 7,300 dead and missing. He said the Social Welfare Department estimates that 1.5 million families, or about 7.5 million people, will need relief assistance. Metropolitan Manila, a sprawling urban area of 12 million, will be spared from the brunt of the typhoon but it is expected to be drenched with intense rain starting late Saturday, forecaster Adzar Aurelio said. “Let us not wait to be told to evacuate,” he said. “Let us evacuate and find the safe places.” Gabriel Llave, a disaster management officer of Aurora’s Baler township, told ABS-CBN television they expect to complete “pre-emptive” evacuations by nightfall. Civil defense chief Alexander Pama advised travelers to areas affected by the typhoon to postpone their trip. He said rescue units and relief supplies have been prepositioned near areas expected to suffer the worst from flooding and landslides. Koppu will likely be equivalent to a Category 3 or 4 hurricane, according to AccuWeather Meteorologist Adam Douty. Douty said 300-600 millimeters (12-24 inches) of rain is expected to be widespread on Luzon but certain areas could be inundated by over 900 mm (36 in.) that is “sure to trigger severe and life-threatening flooding and mudslides.” Koppu will be the 12th storm to hit the Philippines this year. An average of 20 storms pummel the country annually.

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Updated: Sunday, 18 October, 2015 at 09:52 UTC
Description
Thousands of residents of the northern Philippines were forced to flee Sunday as Typhoon Koppu began its multiday battering of the region. The fierce storm is forecast to lumber over the country’s main island of Luzon at an excruciatingly slow pace and dump huge amounts of rain on the rugged terrain, setting off floods and landslides. Koppu came ashore in the early hours of Sunday morning at super typhoon strength, ripping the roofs off buildings and uprooting trees in the coastal province of Aurora. “Through the night, we’ve had extremely ferocious wind, torrential rain,” storm chaser James Reynolds told CNN from the town of Maddela. “The building I’m in — the water’s been coming in the windows.” Roads and communications to three towns in Aurora province have been cut off by flooding and landslides, including Casiguran, where the typhoon made landfall, authorities reported. “Based on the report of the Philippine Army, there were many houses destroyed and trees uprooted in the three towns,” the official Philippines News Agency said. The army and other agencies are trying to clear the routes to Casiguran, which has about 25,000 inhabitants, and the other towns, Dinalungan and Dilasag, it reported. In Baler, another town in Aurora, CNN Philippines reporter Paul Garcia said there was flooding in several neighborhoods. Surprised local residents said that while storms are common in the area, flooding is not, Garcia reported. Roughly 15,000 people are taking shelter in evacuation centers, the Philippines’ disaster management agency said Sunday. That number is expected to rise as the storm, known in the Philippines as Lando, crawls across northern Luzon. No casualties have been reported so far, according to the agency. The storm was packing maximum sustained winds of 240 kph (150 mph) when it slammed into the eastern coast of Luzon, according to the U.S. military’s Joint Typhoon Warning Center, although the Philippines’ national weather agency measured the winds as being significantly weaker, at 185 kph. The typhoon has since lost some of its strength as it has moved over land. The typhoon is predicted to dawdle across northern Luzon for several days because of a ridge of high pressure over China blocking its progress farther north. That gives it longer than usual to soak the region’s mountains and swell its rivers, threatening people who live downhill and downstream. “That’s where the problem with the flash flooding comes in, because when you have all of this rain that keeps coming down over the same places over and over, that is likely to trigger mudslides and landslides in addition to flash flooding problems in … some of the low-lying areas,” Chinchar said. Officials reported dozens of flight cancellations, thousands of people stranded in ports and many municipalities without power.

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Updated: Sunday, 18 October, 2015 at 12:06 UTC
Description
Slow-moving Typhoon Koppu weakened after blowing ashore with fierce winds in the northeastern Philippines on Sunday, leaving at least one person dead and six others missing, while displacing 16,000 villagers, officials said. Army troops and police were deployed to rescue residents trapped in flooded villages in the hard-hit provinces of Aurora, where the typhoon blew ashore early Sunday, and Nueva Ecija, a nearby rice-growing province where floodwaters swamped farmlands at harvest time, officials said. After slamming into Aurora’s Casiguran town after midnight Saturday, the typhoon weakened and slowed considerably, hemmed in by the Sierra Madre mountain range and a high pressure area in the country’s north and another typhoon far out in the Pacific in the east, government forecaster Gladys Saludes said. Howling winds knocked down trees and electric posts, leaving nine entire provinces without power while floods and small landslides made 25 roads and bridges impassable. Authorities suspended dozens of flights and sea voyages due to the stormy weather, and many cities canceled classes on Monday. By Sunday afternoon, the typhoon had veered toward the north from its westward course and was tracked over mountainous Nueva Vizcaya province with sustained winds of 150 kilometers (93 miles) per hour and gusts of up to 185 kph (115 mph), according to the government’s weather agency. Satellite images show that the typhoon appeared to be losing its eye, a sign of its dissipating strength, acting weather bureau chief Esperanza Cayanan told reporters, adding that Koppu was forecast to move at a slow pace of 5 kph (3 mph) across the north before exiting the main northern island of Luzon on Wednesday. While weather had begun to improve in some towns, and villagers had started to clear roads of fallen trees and debris, Koppu was still packing a ferocity that could set off landslides and flash floods, officials said. “There’s still danger,” Cayanan said. “We shouldn’t be complacent.” A teenager was pinned to death on Sunday by a fallen tree, which also injured four people and damaged three houses in suburban Quezon city in the Manila metropolis. A man was electrocuted in northern Tarlac province and two bodies were seen being swept by floodwaters in Nueva Ecija, but authorities were trying to determine whether those were typhoon-related deaths. Three fishermen were reported missing in northern Bataan province, along with three other men in Aurora’s Baler town, according to the Office of Civil Defense. President Benigno Aquino III and disaster-response agencies have warned that Koppu’s rain and winds may potentially bring more damage with its slow speed. But Saludes, the government forecaster, said there was less heavy rain than expected initially in some areas, including in Manila, but fierce winds lashed many regions. A wayward barge carrying coal and 10 crew drifted dangerously close to a breakwater and marina in Manila Bay. A tugboat positioned to prevent the barge from drifting away. Forecasters said the typhoon had a cloud band of 600 kilometers (372 miles) and could dump rain over much of Luzon.

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Updated: Monday, 19 October, 2015 at 06:14 UTC
Description
Army, police and civilian volunteers scrambled Monday to rescue hundreds of villagers trapped in their flooded homes and on rooftops in a northern Philippine province battered by slow-moving Typhoon Koppu. The typhoon blew ashore into northeastern Aurora province with fierce wind and heavy rains early Sunday, leaving at least two dead, forcing more than 16,000 villagers from their homes, and leaving nine provinces without electricity. But after its landfall, the typhoon weakened, hemmed in by the Sierra Madre mountain range and a high pressure area in the country’s north and another typhoon far out in the Pacific in the east, government forecasters said. By Monday morning Koppu was located over Ilocos Norte province with winds of 74 miles per hour and gusts of up to 93 mph. Several of the affected provinces, led by Nueva Ecija, were inundated by flash floods that swelled rivers and cascaded down mountainsides, trapping villagers in their homes and on rooftops, said Nigel Lontoc of the Office of Civil Defense. “There were some people who needed to be rescued from the roofs of their homes,” Lontoc told The Associated Press by telephone on Monday. “But our rescuers couldn’t penetrate because the floodwaters were still high.” Hundreds of soldiers, police and volunteers have converged on Nueva Ecija, a landlocked, rice-growing province in the heartland of the main northern Luzon island, to help villagers whose homes had been flooded, said Lontoc, adding there have been no deaths reported so far in Nueva Ecija’s flooding. Erwin Jacinto, a 37-year-old resident of Nueva Ecija’s Santa Rosa town, said the flooding turned his farmland into “nothing but mud.” Jacinto spoke from the top of a high-level bridge that juts out from his flooded town and where dozens of farm villagers like him stayed in the open overnight with their families, and their pigs and chickens. Koppu’s winds knocked down trees and electric posts, leaving nine provinces without power. Authorities suspended dozens of flights and sea voyages, and many cities canceled classes on Monday. A teenager was pinned to death on Sunday by a fallen tree, which also injured four people and damaged three houses in metropolitan Manila. In Subic town, northwest of Manila, a concrete wall collapsed and killed a 62-year-old woman and injured her husband, officials said. President Benigno Aquino III and disaster-response agencies had warned that Koppu’s rain and winds may potentially bring more damage with its slow speed. But government forecasters said that there was less heavy rain than expected initially in some areas, including in Manila, but that fierce winds lashed many regions. Koppu, Japanese for “cup,” is the 12th storm to hit the Philippines this year. An average of 20 storms and typhoons each year batter the archipelago, one of the world’s most disaster-prone countries.

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Updated: Monday, 19 October, 2015 at 12:21 UTC
Description
At least six people were confirmed dead due to incidents caused by Typhoon Lando over the weekend, according to reports reaching authorities. The National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC), which is based in Quezon City, has reported three fatalities as of late Monday afternoon – one in Quezon City due to an accident involving a fallen tree, one in Benguet due to landslide, and one in Zambales due to a collapsed wall. Meanwhile, the Regional Disaster Risk and Reduction Management in Region III reported four fatalities, including the one in Zambales, as of 6 p.m. Monday. The three other fatalities were two from Nueva Ecija and one in Tarlac. The latest NDRRMC report said five were injured while one was missing. “Para po sa ating casualties, may naitala po tayo na tatlo po na namatay, lima pong injured and isa po ang kasalukuyan na nawawala,” Mina Marasigan, NDRRMC spokesperson, said in a press briefing in Camp Aguinaldo. “Yung sa ating mga namatay na mga biktima, isa po mula sa Zambales, isa [sa] Quezon City, at isa po mula Benguet na ang dahilan po nito ay landslide, dun po sa ating injured ay isa pa rin po sa Zambales, apat po sa Quezon City,” she added. An earlier NDRRMC report identified two of the fatalities as 14-year-old Aron Castillo, who was pinned down by a fallen tree in Quezon City, and 62-year-old Benita Famanilay, who was pinned down by a collapsed wall in Subic, Zambales.

A report by the Office of Civil Defense in the Cordillera Autonomous Region identified the latest fatality as Fernando Laso Gumpad, 57, a resident of Bakun, Benguet. According to the report, the victim went to tend to his farm at around 8 a.m. on Sunday but failed to return home in the afternoon, prompting his wife and son to look for him. “At around 6 p.m. of the same day, his wife and son decided to follow him and saw a landslide near their farm. The wife and son suspected that the victim was buried so they subsequently grabbed a crowbar and grabhoe to dig. The victims lifeless body was reported via cellphone call at around 12:30 a.m. on October 19, 2015,” it said. Meanwhile, the Philippine Coast Guard said seven people died while two others were missing when a passenger banca capsized off Iloilo City on Sunday during the height of Typhoon Lando. Although reports like this indicate a higher death toll, Marasigan said NDRRMC only recorded three fatalities so far as reports need to undergo a stringent validation and confirmation process. “Katulad ng mga report na natatanggap natin mula sa ating ahensya, ito ay dumadaan pa sa confirmation at validation. Di tayo nagre-rely lang sa mga nakukuha natin mula sa social media at sa mga initial reports na binibigay. Ang mahalaga kasi dito ay may body count, may identification, at maitatala nating related nga ito sa bagyo,” she said. Typhoon Lando has affected a total of 283,486 individuals in Regions 1, 2, 3, 5, Calabarzon (Calamba, Laguna, Batangas, Rizal, and Quezon) and the CAR. Of this number, 132, 621 individuals are staying with their families. Marasigan said the NDRRMC is continuously monitoring the rise of water in the Ambuklao, Binga and Magat Dams. A total of 36 road sections and 18 bridges, meanwhile, have been rendered impassable due to floods and possible landslides.

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Updated: Monday, 19 October, 2015 at 14:29 UTC
Description
Army, police and civilian volunteers rushed Monday to rescue hundreds of villagers trapped in their flooded homes and on rooftops in a northern Philippine province battered by slow-moving Typhoon Koppu, officials said. The typhoon blew ashore into northeastern Aurora province early Sunday, leaving at least 11 dead, forcing more than 65,000 villagers from their homes, and leaving nine provinces without electricity. By Monday afternoon, Koppu had weakened into a tropical storm over Ilocos Norte province with winds of 105 kilometers (65 miles) per hour and gusts of up to 135 kph (84 mph). Several of the affected provinces, led by Nueva Ecija, were inundated by floods that swelled rivers and cascaded down mountains, trapping villagers in their homes, said Nigel Lontoc of the Office of Civil Defense. “There were people who got trapped by the flood on their roofs, some were rescued already,” Vice Mayor Henry Velarde of Nueva Ecija’s Jaen town told The Associated Press by telephone, adding that about 80 percent of 27 villages in his farming town of more than 45,000 people were inundated by flood. When a flooded river swamped the villages, residents scrambled to safety but many failed to save their poultry and farm animals. Out of more than 5,000 ducks, for example, only about 1,000 were saved and many rice crops ready to be harvested in a few weeks turned into a muddy waste, he said. “Our rice farms looked like it was ran over by a giant flat iron,” Velarde said. “All the rice stalks were flattened in one direction.” Hundreds of soldiers, police and volunteers have converged on Nueva Ecija, a landlocked, rice-growing province in the heart of Luzon island, to help villagers whose homes had been flooded, said Lontoc.

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Updated: Tuesday, 20 October, 2015 at 03:31 UTC
Description
Koppu weakened from typhoon to tropical storm even as some areas of northern Philippines remained flooded, and authorities warned flooding and landslides could worsen. As of 4 a.m., local time Tuesday, Koppu’s winds slowed to 95 kilometers per hour (59 mph) as its center left the main Philippine island of Luzon, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration said. Its winds were as strong as 185 kph (115 mph) just before hitting land Sunday. Aside from weakening, it is now forecast to turn east into the Pacific Ocean in the next few days, sparing Taiwan, the U.S. Navy Joint Typhoon Warning Center predicted. Sixteen people were dead and more than 60,000 forced to evacuate, Agence France-Presse reported. The worst single incident reported so far was the drowning of seven people on a ferry that capsized off the island of Guimaras Sunday. The casualty report may climb as information comes in from remote areas, or areas where transport and communication have been cut off. Authorities warned people in evacuation centers not to return to their homes, saying even if rains have abated, the water they left in the mountains will flow down for days, ABS-CBN News said. Rice and other crops were destroyed, and farm animals were killed by the wind, rains and floods, the Philippine Daily Inquirer and other media reported. The typhoon hit regions considered among the country’s biggest sources of rice, the country’s staple. That could revive inflation, which is low, or even increase world prices. The Philippines is one of the world’s biggest importers of the grain.

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International Business Times

Koppu Forces 60,000 To Evacuate In The Philippines, Flooding May Continue; Death Toll Rises To 22

By on October 19 2015 7:33 PM EDT
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A man crosses a flooded road in Sta Rosa, Nueva Ecija, one of the provinces hardest hit by Typhoon Koppu, Oct. 19, 2015. Koppu has weakened to a tropical storm, but authorities warn flooding may continue as water comes down from higher elevations. Reuters

UPDATE: 1 a.m. EDT — The death toll from Koppu rose to 22 as more reports came in from northern Philippines, Agence France-Presse reported.

Meanwhile, the one-time supertyphoon, now classified as a tropical storm, weakened further, with winds of 85 kilometers per hour,according to the national weather agency.

 

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Cars Trapped In Mud After Rain Brings Flash Flooding To Los Angeles

There were no immediate reports of any injuries.

<span class='image-component__caption' itemprop="caption">This still frame from video provided by KABC-TV shows vehicles stuck in a muddy road in the mountainous community of Lake Hughes, Calif., about 65 miles north of downtown Los Angeles, Thursday, Oct. 15, 2015.</span> ASSOCIATED PRESS This still frame from video provided by KABC-TV shows vehicles stuck in a muddy road in the mountainous community of Lake Hughes, Calif., about 65 miles north of downtown Los Angeles, Thursday, Oct. 15, 2015.

 

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Flash flooding north of Los Angeles sent water and mud flowing into canyons and across roadways Thursday, trapping drivers and closing a stretch of one of the state’s main north-south freeways.

The California Highway Patrol reported a 30-mile section of Interstate 5 was blocked by flooding near Fort Tejon, about 75 miles north of downtown Los Angeles.

Drivers stuck in the mud waited for roads to be cleared while thousands more were diverted to alternate routes expected to take four or more hours to traverse through the mountain region in Southern California.

There were no immediate reports of any injuries.

“Due to the drought and fires, all the rain coming down heavily is causing floods,” CHP Officer Andrew Mack said. “We have a lot of people up there trapped on the roadway.”

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Flooding, mudslides strand Southern California drivers following storm

Reuters

 

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – Heavy rains touched off flooding and mudslides in foothill communities north of Los Angeles on Thursday, swamping cars, stranding drivers and prompting authorities to close several major roads.

 

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The Latest: All Interstate 5 lanes reopened after mudslide

Associated Press

This image taken from video provided by KABC-TV, shows a vehicle stuck along a muddy road in the mountainous community of Green Valley, Calif., about 65 miles northwest of downtown Los Angeles on Thursday, Oct. 15, 2015. Flash flooding in northern Los Angeles County has filled several roads with mud, stranding vehicles and blocking traffic on one of the state’s main highways. (KABC-TV via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT; TV OUT
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LOS ANGELES (AP) — The latest on mudslides that closed a California interstate (all times local):

6:20 p.m.

All lanes of Interstate 5 have been reopened, about 24 hours after the major north-south artery linking Los Angeles and Central California was blocked by a mudslide.

A spokeswoman with the California Highway Patrol says all lanes were cleared shortly after 6 p.m. Friday. Two southbound lanes and the northbound ones were reopened earlier in the day.

A storm system that drenched northern Los Angeles County Thursday sent mud and debris onto the roadway, trapping hundreds of drivers. Highway crews worked overnight and throughout Friday to free vehicles and clear the roadway.

To the west, State Road 58 is expected to remain closed for days.

5:55 p.m.

A fresh round of flash flooding stranded dozens of vehicles on a highway in Central California, but the troubles appear to be only temporary.

Santa Barbara County fire spokesman Dave Zaniboni said the Friday afternoon flooding affected Highway 166 west of Cuyama. That’s a remote, sparsely populated community about 50 miles north of Santa Barbara.

Zaniboni says about 100 vehicles, including a school bus, were stuck on the roadway at one time but that traffic began moving by Friday evening.

 

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By Sean Breslin
Published Oct 13 2015 11:35 AM EDT
weather.com

At least 13 people were killed early Tuesday when a hillside gave way and buried several makeshift homes in a slum of southern Pakistan’s port city of Karachi, officials said.

The mass of mud and rocks came down the hill and hit a camp in the capital of the southern Sindh province, according to the Associated Press. It has not been determined if weather caused the collapse.

Seven children were among those killed by the disaster, officials told the BBC.

 

 

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12 October 03 2015 02:50 AM Landslide Guatemala Municipio de Santa Catarina Pinula, El Cambray Dos Damage level Details

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Updated: Wednesday, 14 October, 2015 at 03:26 UTC

Description
Guatemalan authorities on Tuesday called off the search for victims buried under a massive landslide that killed at least 280 people near the Central American nation’s capital. The National Disaster Reduction Commission decided it was time to end the search and rescue operation, while work to stabilize and recover the disaster zone will continue, agency chief Alejandro Maldonado said. He said 70 people are listed as missing. The number has fluctuated in the nearly two weeks since the disaster as bodies were found and missing people were accounted for. Some 50 unidentified human remains will be subjected to DNA testing. “The people are aware that the necessary time has been given to searching for cadavers,” said Williams Mancilla, minister of national defense and a member of the disaster commission’s board. “Now they have passed that phase and what interests them is the next one.” The Oct. 1 slide unleashed at least 105 million cubic feet (3 million cubic meters) of earth on a neighborhood in Santa Catarina Pinula, on the outskirts of Guatemala City. Maldonado, who is the son of Guatemala’s president, also named Alejandro Maldonado, said it will be up to the local government to decide if the disaster area is declared a gravesite. Authorities promised financial aid for victims of the slide and are proposing to build 150 new homes for survivors on a 10-block parcel of land near Guatemala City that was seized from a convicted drug trafficker and gang leader.

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Bulldozers move land for a fourth day to search for victims of a fatal mudslide, amid new, smaller slides in Cambray, a neighborhood in the suburb of Santa Catarina Pinula, on the outskirts of Guatemala City, Monday, Oct. 5, 2015. (AP Photo/Moises

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Death toll in Guatemalan mudslide reaches 253, as 374 still remain missing

  • Mudslide 253 Deaths.jpg

    Rescuers leave after a day of searching for victims of a mudslide in Cambray, a neighborhood in the suburb of Santa Catarina Pinula, on the outskirts of Guatemala City, Friday, Oct. 9, 2015. The death toll of the massive landslide has risen over 250 as the search for victims entered its second week. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

The death toll from the mammoth landslide that buried a neighborhood on the outskirts of Guatemala’s capital has risen to 253 as the search for victims enters its second week. Nearly 400 people were still missing Friday.

 

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October 03 2015 02:50 AM Landslide Guatemala Municipio de Santa Catarina Pinula, El Cambray Dos Damage level Details

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Landslide in Guatemala on Saturday, 03 October, 2015 at 02:50 (02:50 AM) UTC.

Description
Rescue workers in Guatemala are digging through rubble from a mudslide that hit a village not far from the capital, in search of hundreds missing. At least 26 bodies have so far been recovered from the village of El Cambray Dos, rescue services say. Heavy rains swept a torrent of boulders and mud onto houses on Thursday, 15km (nine miles) east of Guatemala City. Relatives have been receiving calls and texts from people trapped under the rubble, reporters at the scene say. The injured and homeless are being taken to makeshift shelters. Julio Sanchez, a spokesman for Guatemala’s volunteer firefighters, said 26 people had died and another 36 people were taken to hospitals.

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Sunday, 04 October, 2015 at 09:50 UTC

At least 30 people were dead and several hundred missing a day after a landslide smashed through a village on the outskirts of the Guatemalan capital, officials said. More than 500 rescue workers, police and soldiers, as well as desperate residents, clawed away at the debris with picks and shovels searching for survivors all day and into the late evening, before suspending the painstaking hunt for the night. Families reported receiving text messages from people they believed to still be trapped, more than 24 hours after the landslide struck the village of El Cambray II, in the municipality of Santa Catarina Pinula. Authorities said that about 600 people are missing and they expect the death toll to rise. Their estimate is based on the 125 homes that Thursday’s landslide destroyed or damaged after heavy rain. The affected area is about 15 kilometers (10 miles) east of the capital Guatemala City. “We have 29 dead people identified and one still unidentified,” Sergio Cabanas, incident commander for the government’s disaster reduction office CONRAD, told AFP. The victims include at least three children. Thirty-four people were pulled out alive from the mud and rubble, while 25 others were injured, CONRAD officials said. The impact of the heavy rain was exacerbated by a nearby river, officials said. Municipal authorities had urged the community several times to relocate, most recently in November last year. Amid the debris Josue Coloma, a 40-year-old mechanic, anxiously looked on as a rescue crew dug through the mud searching for any sign of his two nephews, ages 11 and 14. “My nephews should be in the place where I’m standing,” Coloma told AFP. “I have trust in God that they are well.” Two other relatives who were with the kids at the time of the landslide were pulled out alive, Coloma said, while their parents survived because they were out of the house at a religious service. “The rescue job is very difficult because of the terrain — it’s practically as if it were a mountain,” said Cecilio Chacaj, a rescuer with a local firefighter unit. Soon after Chacaj spoke to AFP he pulled out a survivor from the debris. President Alejandro Maldonado said that several countries, including the United States and Cuba, had offered to help. “We are a beautiful country but unfortunately we are vulnerable to this type of catastrophes,” Maldonado told reporters. The hunt for survivors was expected to resume at sun rise. Eight people had already died in previous weather-related events tied to Guatemala’s rainy season, which lasts from May to November, according to government data. Last year’s rainy season was linked to 29 deaths and damage to more than 9,000 homes.

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Sunday, 04 October, 2015 at 03:08 UTC

A Guatemalan emergency official says the number of people killed when a hillside collapsed Friday on more than 100 homes has risen to 56. Julio Sanchez, a spokesperson for Guatemala’s volunteer firefighters, says officials estimate that 350 people remain missing. The previous death toll was 30 and estimates of the number of missing had been as high as 600. Rescue specialists from the Red Cross and fire and police departments were using dogs to search for possible survivors in the mudslide zone on the outskirts of Guatemala City, where tons of earth fell over some 125 homes, authorities from the region estimate.

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Sunday, 04 October, 2015 at 16:07 UTC

Hopes faded of finding any remaining survivors of a massive landslide in Guatemala that killed at least 86 people, even as families scrabbled through rubble to find the bodies of loved-ones, with hundreds of others still missing. Distraught relatives of the victims shoveled alongside diggers through the mounds of earth that destroyed homes in Santa Catarina Pinula on the southeastern flank of Guatemala City after Thursday night’s collapse of a hillside. Every batch of earth turned up by the diggers held more personal belongings, from mattresses and books to toys and Christmas decorations, reminders of around 350 people who authorities said were still unaccounted for. Clutching photos of loved-ones, family members stood in line outside a makeshift morgue near the excavation site, some of them crying, to see if they recognized any corpses. “This is the worst thing that has happened to us,” said Ana Maria Escobar, a 48-year-old housewife, sobbing as she waited for news of 21 missing family members who lived in the town she had left a year ago. “So far only my sister-in-law has been found,” she added. One digger unearthed the body of a little girl with scratch marks on her arms and legs, which rescue workers said may have been signs of her struggles to escape. People looking on cried out to prevent the digger from destroying her body. Gaby Ramirez, an 18-year-old courier, had been searching for her brother with shovel in hand since 6 a.m., after the landslide buried a neighbor’s house he was visiting. “I don’t hope to find him alive, but I do hope to find his body and bury him,” she said. “I have to bury him, I can’t leave him there.” Loosened by rain, tons of earth, rock and trees had cascaded onto a neighborhood of the town known as El Cambray II near the bottom of a ravine, flattening houses and trapping residents who had gone home for the night. Some houses were buried under about 50 feet (15 meters) of earth, and Guatemalan disaster agency Conred said it doubted any other survivors would be found. “Hope is the last think you lose, so we hope to find someone alive,” said Guatemala’s defense minister Williams Mansilla, though he also acknowledged the likelihood was very low. At last count, the Attorney General’s office reported 86 dead via Twitter, though fears that hundreds more remain trapped threaten to make the landslide one of the worst natural disasters to hit Central America in recent years. Among the dead were 17 children, and at least 26 people were injured. On Friday, there were reports of family members receiving text messages of buried survivors asking to be rescued. Authorities said they did not rescue a single survivor on Saturday despite a team of around 1,800 volunteers, soldiers and firemen. But some 400 survivors had been evacuated in total from the site since the tragedy, they added. The search was scheduled to end around 7.30 p.m. local time, and in keeping with international protocol, it would be relaunched for at least one more day on Sunday. Due to the unstable terrain and wet weather, volunteers would no longer be allowed to assist on Sunday. The tragedy has hit Guatemala after weeks of political turmoil, just as it prepares to elect a new president. Last month, outgoing President Otto Perez was forced to stand down and was arrested on corruption charges. In October 2005, heavy rainfall triggered a devastating landslide in Panabaj in the southwest of the Central American country, burying the village. Hundreds of people are believed to have died, and many of the bodies were never recovered.

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Updated: Monday, 05 October, 2015 at 02:55 UTC
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At least 131 people were killed in mudslides that smashed into a village outside Guatemala City, officials said, three days after the disaster struck the Central American nation. “Unfortunately, a new count shows that there are 131 confirmed dead and recovered,” and still about 300 people missing and unaccounted for, said volunteer fire brigade spokesman Julio Sanchez. He told reporters yesterday that several young children, including newborn babies, were among the dead in Santa Catarina Pinula. On Thursday night, following heavy rain, waterlogged earth and debris tore through the village of El Cambray II, in the municipality of Santa Catarina Pinula, destroying or damaging 125 homes. Relatives of the missing checked in at a makeshift morgue set up next to the buried homes. Municipal authorities had urged the community, about 15 kilometres east of the capital Guatemala City, to relocate several times, most recently in November of last year. But many families have refused, saying that they have nowhere to go. “We can’t live here any more,” Carlos Hernandez, an electrician who survived the landslide, lamented as he stepped between rescuers with his few remaining belongings on his shoulder. Late yesterday, rescue workers had to suspend their work when rain resumed, making things too dangerous to continue before Monday. The bad news came as, with every passing hour, hopes for finding survivors fade a bit further.

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Updated: Tuesday, 06 October, 2015 at 17:14 UTC
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The death toll from a mudslide on the outskirts of the Guatemalan capital has climbed to 152, as rescue workers recover more bodies from a hillside. The development came late Monday, with chief of emergency services Alejandro Maldonado saying that at least 300 people were still unaccounted for. The landslide, which was triggered by torrential rains, happened in the Cambray neighborhood in Guatemala City’s suburb of Santa Catarina Pinula on October 1. Search crews have found entire families who died huddled together and buried alive. “We found almost all of them huddled together, which means that they were going to try and evacuate but sadly they didn’t have time,” Sergio Cabanas, an official at Guatemala’s National Disaster Reduction Commission, known as the Conred, said. “Some died from the impact, some from asphyxiation and some… from heart attacks,” he added. The Conred has now declared the area uninhabitable.

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Updated: Wednesday, 07 October, 2015 at 03:21 UTC
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The death toll from a landslide caused by heavy rain in Guatemala’s Santa Catarina Pinula municipality reached 175, the country’s public prosecutor’s office said Tuesday. The earlier reports had put the number of victims at 161. More than 300 people remain missing. “Prosecutors [on site] report that 175 bodies have been recovered as of now,” the office said on Twitter. The landslide occurred late on Thursday in a suburb located about 9 miles east of the country’s capital Guatemala City, burying some 125 homes. Nearly 1,800 people are involved in the ongoing search and rescue operations, including Red Cross workers, police officers and rescue teams.

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Updated: Wednesday, 07 October, 2015 at 18:36 UTC
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Guatemala raised today the death toll to 186, confirmed by a recent landslide that buried a community near the capital and where there are still nearly 300 missing. The Public Prosecutor updated the data after the morgue received more bodies recovered in the last hours by rescue teams of the country and Mexican brigades. According to the State Coordinator for Disaster Reduction, crews continue to search for the missing with the support of canine units, but with no hope of finding any survivors. A huge landslide buried last Thursday El Cambray II locality, located at 15 kilometers from the Guatemalan capital and where the ground was saturated by the rains of the previous days. That community was included among high-risk areas by poor urban planning and the high concentration of poverty. The government described the tragedy as the worst and strongest of 2015, as it left under mud125 homes and 172 homeless. Moreover, declared uninhabitable the area where the landslide occurred, restricted press access and instructed rescuers to wear masks at all times because of the strong odors emitted by decomposing bodies. On this day national mourning decreed concludes Monday in tribute to the victims.

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Updated: Thursday, 08 October, 2015 at 11:52 UTC
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Rescue workers pulled 20 more bodies from a landslide outside the Guatemalan capital, bringing the number of confirmed dead to 191, officials have said. “The latest toll of victims is 191,” said Julio Sanchez yesterday, a spokesman for the firefighters and other rescue personnel working at the site on the outskirts of Guatemala City. Authorities said about 150 people still have not been accounted for, as they searched for more bodies at the disaster site in the village of Cambray II. A growing stench from decomposing bodies has filled the air at the scene of the tragedy, requiring workers to don face masks as the carry on with their grim recovery efforts. The village — in a section of the town of Santa Catarina Pinula, some 15 kilometers east of the capital — was buried late Thursday by a mountain of mud and debris following heavy rains. Rescuers said it would be nothing short of a miracle if anyone were found alive at this point, as they continue their search for more bodies, aided by specially-trained dogs. Officials said they also have opened an investigation to determine who or what might have been responsible for the disaster.

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Updated: Friday, 09 October, 2015 at 02:53 UTC
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At least 220 bodies have been recovered after a massive landslide buried part of a town in Guatemala last week while about 350 people are missing, national disaster agency Conred said on Thursday. Loosened by heavy rains, a hillside collapsed onto Santa Catarina Pinula on the southeastern flank of Guatemala City on Oct. 1, burying more than a hundred homes under tons of earth, rock and trees, and sparking a huge rescue effort. Conred said 386 people were evacuated after the tragedy, one of the worst in years to strike Central America, a region long been prone to devastating floods. Entire families were buried alive and hundreds of rescue workers have spent the past week trying to dig out bodies. Guatemalan authorities initially said up to 600 people were accounted for in the disaster. Since then, it has given various estimates on the number missing. Prosecutors in Guatemala said they are looking at whether there was any criminal misconduct at the site after Conred had warned of the risks of building homes in the neighbourhood, which lies at the bottom of a deep ravine.

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Updated: Saturday, 10 October, 2015 at 03:01 UTC
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The death toll from the mammoth landslide that buried a neighborhood on the outskirts of Guatemala’s capital has risen to 253 as the search for victims enters its second week. Nearly 400 people were still missing Friday. Deputy hospitals minister Israel Lemus said officials still had not decided to suspend the search in Santa Catarina Pinula, but planned to meet to discuss it on Monday. Alejandro Maldonado, executive director of the National Disaster Reduction Commission, said the current count of missing people stood at 374. He said 184 homes were affected. Maldonado said the decision to stop or continue looking for bodies would be based on the risk to search crews.

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Updated: Saturday, 10 October, 2015 at 03:01 UTC
Description
The death toll from the mammoth landslide that buried a neighborhood on the outskirts of Guatemala’s capital has risen to 253 as the search for victims enters its second week. Nearly 400 people were still missing Friday. Deputy hospitals minister Israel Lemus said officials still had not decided to suspend the search in Santa Catarina Pinula, but planned to meet to discuss it on Monday. Alejandro Maldonado, executive director of the National Disaster Reduction Commission, said the current count of missing people stood at 374. He said 184 homes were affected. Maldonado said the decision to stop or continue looking for bodies would be based on the risk to search crews.

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The number of people killed by the deadly landslide that hit a Guatemalan city has risen to 131, authorities said, with potentially 300 more people still missing three days after the disaster.

An estimated 125 homes were buried in El Cambray, a village on the outskirts of the capital, Guatemala City, when a 300ft hillside collapsed and covered an area of four acres with mud and dirt around 14 metres deep.

Rescue workers continued to pull corpses from the mud on Sunday as families began to bury their dead in the overcrowded local cemetery.

A funeral procession for the son and grandaughter of 59-year-old carpenter and painter Ismael Estrada saw 200 people walking through the streets to the cemetary. Estrada returned to the improvised morgue immediately after the service to search for his 19 family members that are still missing.

 

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