Category: meteors


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 Wikimedia.org     Leonid meteor shower.
Image is a depiction, not intended as the factual image referred to in this report
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Search near I-95 turns up empty

Posted: 7:44 AM, December 17, 2015 Updated: 8:40 AM, December 18, 2015

PALM BAY, Fla. – A mysterious, fiery object falling from the sky was reported in Brevard County, prompting authorities to launch a search, officials said.

Nothing was found after 911 callers reported seeing a fiery object falling to the ground.

The calls were received about 7 a.m. Thursday, with reports of the mysterious object striking the area near the Interstate 95 onramp on the southbound side of Palm Bay Road.

 

Read More Here

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by Dr. Tony Phillips.

GEMINID METEOR SHOWER–TONIGHT!

 

The annual Geminid meteor shower peaks tonight, Dec. 13-14, as Earth passes through a stream of gravelly debris from “rock comet” 3200 Phaethon. Dark-sky observers in both hemispheres could see as many as 120 meteors per hour during the dark hours between midnight and sunrise on Dec. 14th. Last night, Dec. 12-13, NASA’s all-sky meteor network detected 15 Geminid fireballs over the USA. That number will surely grow on peak night–tonight! Got clouds? Listen for Geminid echoes in the audio feed from our live meteor radar.

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Geminids meteor shower prediction: Moonless and marvelous
  • Geminids meteor shower is peaking
  • Geminid meteors can flash into view anywhere in the night sky

(Sky and Telescope)The nights of December 13-14 offer dark skies for a popular, underappreciated meteor display.

The Geminid meteor shower competes with August’s Perseids for showiness — yet it’s not nearly as well-known. The Geminids are easier on your sleep schedule, too. Their radiant (near Castor in Gemini) climbs as high by 11 p.m. standard time (45 degrees above the local horizon) as the Perseid radiant does by 2 a.m. daylight time on the peak Perseid nights. The higher the radiant, the more meteors you’ll see.

The Geminid meteors can flash into view anywhere in the late-night sky when the shower peaks in mid-December. But if you follow their paths back far enough, they all appear to diverge from a point in the constellation Gemini.

The International Meteor Organization (IMO) predicts that the Geminids should reach an impressive zenithal hourly rate of 120 this year. (ZHR is how many meteors you’d see see per hour in a very dark sky if the radiant were at the zenith. This year the peak should be centered on roughly 18h Universal Time on December 14. Unfortunately, that’s 1 p.m. EST and 10 a.m. PST. So in North America the shower’s performance is likely to be similar on the nights of December 13-14 and 14-15.

This week’s sky at a glance

As the IMO notes, “Near-peak Geminid rates persist for almost a day, so much of the world has a chance to enjoy something of the shower’s best.” In addition, “mass-sorting within the stream means fainter telescopic meteors should be most abundant almost a day ahead of the visual maximum,” and the meteors after maximum are typically brighter than average.

The moon will be a waxing crescent a few days old, no trouble at all.

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NASA Confirms 60 feet Asteroid is on Course for a Close Encounter with Earth

All Sky Fireball Network

Every night, a network of NASA all-sky cameras scans the skies above the United States for meteoritic fireballs. Automated software maintained by NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office calculates their orbits, velocity, penetration depth in Earth’s atmosphere and many other characteristics. Daily results are presented here on Spaceweather.com.

On Dec. 13, 2015, the network reported 29 fireballs.
(15 Geminids, 10 sporadics, 2 December Monocerotids, 1 Quadrantid, 1 alpha Canis Majorid)

In this diagram of the inner solar system, all of the fireball orbits intersect at a single point–Earth. The orbits are color-coded by velocity, from slow (red) to fast (blue). [Larger image] [movies]

Near Earth Asteroids

Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) are space rocks larger than approximately 100m that can come closer to Earth than 0.05 AU. None of the known PHAs is on a collision course with our planet, although astronomers are finding new ones all the time.

On December 13, 2015 there were potentially hazardous asteroids.

Recent & Upcoming Earth-asteroid encounters:

Asteroid
Date(UT)
Miss Distance
Size
2015 XU169
Dec 10
9.5 LD
16 m
1998 WT24
Dec 11
10.9 LD
1.1 km
2015 XA169
Dec 12
7.4 LD
15 m
2015 XR169
Dec 13
1.3 LD
8 m
2015 XX128
Dec 14
2.4 LD
25 m
2015 XX169
Dec 14
8.4 LD
14 m
2015 XN55
Dec 15
2.5 LD
15 m
2015 XY261
Dec 15
0.8 LD
16 m
2015 XL261
Dec 17
9.7 LD
42 m
2015 XE1
Dec 19
13.2 LD
29 m
2015 XN261
Dec 23
2.6 LD
31 m
2011 YD29
Dec 24
9.7 LD
24 m
2003 SD220
Dec 24
28.4 LD
1.8 km
2008 CM
Dec 29
22.8 LD
1.5 km
2004 MQ1
Jan 2
55.4 LD
1.1 km
1999 JV6
Jan 6
12.6 LD
410 m
1685 Toro
Jan 22
60.9 LD
1.7 km
2001 XR1
Jan 23
74.4 LD
1.5 km
2015 VC2
Jan 28
5.8 LD
15 m

Notes: LD means “Lunar Distance.” 1 LD = 384,401 km, the distance between Earth and the Moon. 1 LD also equals 0.00256 AU. MAG is the visual magnitude of the asteroid on the date of closest approach.

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The Province

Exploding meteor: Bright bolide lights up Friday night sky from Chilliwack to Nanaimo to Seattle

Exploding meteor: Bright bolide lights up Friday night sky from Chilliwack to Nanaimo to Seattle
A bolide, or exploding meteor, similar to this one was spotted in the night sky over the Lower Mainland and Western Washington on Friday night.
Photograph by: NASA , The Province

 

Tina Robertson was just trying to catch a stray cat out in front of her property when she heard it.

“It freaked me right out,” she said.

Then she looked up to see a “big ball of fire.”

“It was moving like hell,” she said. “It was big, but not as big as that one in Russia.”

What she and other witnesses as far afield as Seattle and Nanaimo seem to have seen around 6:50 p.m. Friday was a type of meteor known as a bolide. Bolides are as bright as a full moon; they’re a meteor that doesn’t just burn up as it travels through the atmosphere, it explodes.

(Hat tip to Seattle Twitter user Reb Roush for pointing us all to the term.)

Robertson’s partner Wilf Krickhan was loading up firewood in a bobcat behind the house when he saw the blue-green bolide flash across the sky.

 

Read More Here

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All Sky Fireball Network

by Dr. Tony Phillips.

Every night, a network of NASA all-sky cameras scans the skies above the United States for meteoritic fireballs. Automated software maintained by NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office calculates their orbits, velocity, penetration depth in Earth’s atmosphere and many other characteristics. Daily results are presented here on Spaceweather.com.

On Nov. 17, 2015, the network reported 38 fireballs.
(23 sporadics, 9 Northern Taurids, 3 Leonids, 2 November I Draconids, 1 omicron Eridanid)

In this diagram of the inner solar system, all of the fireball orbits intersect at a single point–Earth. The orbits are color-coded by velocity, from slow (red) to fast (blue). [Larger image] [movies]

 

Near Earth Asteroids

 

Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) are space rocks larger than approximately 100m that can come closer to Earth than 0.05 AU. None of the known PHAs is on a collision course with our planet, although astronomers are finding new ones all the time.

On November 18, 2015 there were 1634 potentially hazardous asteroids.

Recent & Upcoming Earth-asteroid encounters:

Asteroid
Date(UT)
Miss Distance
Size
2015 VR64
Nov 12
3 LD
14 m
2015 VV105
Nov 13
9 LD
10 m
2015 VU65
Nov 14
5.2 LD
23 m
2015 VY105
Nov 15
0.09 LD
7 m
2015 VN105
Nov 16
5.5 LD
13 m
2015 VD105
Nov 16
7.2 LD
52 m
2015 VC106
Nov 18
7 LD
24 m
2005 UL5
Nov 20
5.9 LD
390 m
2015 VE66
Nov 21
7.5 LD
64 m
2015 VO142
Nov 24
1 LD
7 m
2015 VH2
Nov 24
12.9 LD
14 m
2003 EB50
Nov 29
48.8 LD
2.2 km
2007 BG29
Dec 1
54.1 LD
1.1 km
2015 VZ145
Dec 8
9.2 LD
81 m
1998 WT24
Dec 11
10.9 LD
1.1 km
2011 YD29
Dec 24
9.7 LD
24 m
2003 SD220
Dec 24
28.4 LD
1.8 km
2008 CM
Dec 29
22.8 LD
1.5 km
2004 MQ1
Jan 2
55.4 LD
1.1 km
1999 JV6
Jan 6
12.6 LD
410 m

Notes: LD means “Lunar Distance.” 1 LD = 384,401 km, the distance between Earth and the Moon. 1 LD also equals 0.00256 AU. MAG is the visual magnitude of the asteroid on the date of closest approach.

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PICTURES: The perfect moment in space and time caught above Aberdeenshire

9 November 2015 by Andrew Douglas

Wow
Wow

An aurora-hunting north-east photographer has captured a stunning image of a meteorite fireball falling to earth.

Leigh-Ann Mitchell, from Ellon, had been out at the weekend scouring the night skies for any sign of the Northern Lights.

The self-proclaimed “aurora chaser” settled at Pitfour Estate in Mintlaw, where she thought she had the best chance of capturing the spectacular light show.

But the 40-year-old amateur snapper got more than she bargained for when she captured the moment a fireball from the Taurid meteor shower fell from the sky, combined with the heavenly aurora glow.

The shower is notorious for producing fireball flares, and experts said this year would be the best chance to witness them yet.

Mrs Mitchell’s photograph has been viewed thousands of times since it was taken in the very early hours of Saturday morning, and shared across social media in every corner of the globe.

 

Read More Here

 

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Incredible green meteor pictured off coast of Yorkshire

Looks pretty creepy, but is pretty logical (Picture: Ross Parry)

It might look like something from Close Encounters of the Third Kind – but there’s an entirely logical reason for this eerie green light hovering in the sky above a home.

It’s actually a meteorite – and was captured on camera by Peter Horbury as it flashed through the clear night sky near Whitby, North Yorkshire.

The remarkable sight was captured at the same time as the Taurid Meteor Shower passes Earth – with larger cellestial debris being more visible than usual.

Peter, 57, captured the snap at 1.30 am on Saturday after he headed to Hornblower Lodge in Whitby, North Yorkshire.

 

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Fireballs are falling to Earth tonight in numbers we won’t see for another 10 years — here’s how to watch

jorwig@businesssinsider.com (Jessica Orwig) 
Keep your eyes peeled tonight for some spectacular fireballs lighting up the sky.

 taurid: KHONTHAI Channel on Youtube© Provided by Business Insider KHONTHAI Channel on Youtube

Fireballs are extremely bright meteors, and right now Earth is in the midst of the Tuarid meteor shower, which is peaking on the night of Wednesday, Nov. 11.

“The best time to view the Taurids is from midnight to 3 am local time,” NASA wrote in a Reddit AMA. “There should be a handful per hour. Taurid rates are not high, but the ones you will see will be very bright.”

The peak of the shower — when we can see the most meteors per hour — is expected to have between seven to 10 meteors per hour, and some of those are almost certain to be a fireball. The best way to watch any meteor shower is to get far away from city lights and look up, no special equipment required.

However, fireballs are bright enough to be seen even amidst city lights, so if you can’t get far away from the city, there’s still a chance you might spot one, or more.

Look to Taurus

Meteor showers usually happen when Earth passes through a comet’s stream of residual dust and debris in space.

TaurusCC: KHONTHAI Channel on Youtube

© Provided by Business Insider KHONTHAI Channel on Youtube The debris collides with our planet, is pulled toward Earth’s center by gravity, and burns up in the atmosphere, producing bright streaks in the night sky that we sometimes refer to as falling stars.

Compared to other meteor showers, the Taurid meteors are relatively sluggish, colliding with Earth at speeds of about 65,000 mph — less than half the speed of the rapid Perseid meteors, which move at about 133,000 mph.

 

Read More Here

 

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Image Source  NASA

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All Sky Fireball Network

By Dr. Tony Phillips.

Every night, a network of NASA all-sky cameras scans the skies above the United States for meteoritic fireballs. Automated software maintained by NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office calculates their orbits, velocity, penetration depth in Earth’s atmosphere and many other characteristics. Daily results are presented here on Spaceweather.com.

On Nov. 2, 2015, the network reported 37 fireballs.
(22 sporadics, 14 Northern Taurids, 1 Orionid)

In this diagram of the inner solar system, all of the fireball orbits intersect at a single point–Earth. The orbits are color-coded by velocity, from slow (red) to fast (blue). [Larger image] [movies]

 

Near Earth Asteroids

Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) are space rocks larger than approximately 100m that can come closer to Earth than 0.05 AU. None of the known PHAs is on a collision course with our planet, although astronomers are finding new ones all the time.

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  Earth approaching objects (objects that are known in the next 30 days)
Object Name Apporach Date Left AU Distance LD Distance Estimated Diameter* Relative Velocity
(2010 UJ7) 02nd November 2015 0 day(s) 0.1582 61.6 22 m – 49 m 13.31 km/s 47916 km/h
(2015 TG238) 03rd November 2015 1 day(s) 0.1865 72.6 76 m – 170 m 12.02 km/s 43272 km/h
(2015 TD179) 03rd November 2015 1 day(s) 0.0271 10.6 35 m – 78 m 10.12 km/s 36432 km/h
(2009 LD) 05th November 2015 3 day(s) 0.1397 54.4 15 m – 34 m 9.49 km/s 34164 km/h
(2002 XY38) 05th November 2015 3 day(s) 0.0828 32.2 70 m – 160 m 8.85 km/s 31860 km/h
(2015 TM143) 06th November 2015 4 day(s) 0.0690 26.8 51 m – 110 m 6.37 km/s 22932 km/h
(2015 TL143) 06th November 2015 4 day(s) 0.0657 25.6 70 m – 160 m 8.57 km/s 30852 km/h
(2008 VA15) 06th November 2015 4 day(s) 0.0750 29.2 51 m – 110 m 5.47 km/s 19692 km/h
(2008 WQ2) 08th November 2015 6 day(s) 0.0679 26.4 37 m – 82 m 8.45 km/s 30419.999999999996 km/h
(2012 HG8) 08th November 2015 6 day(s) 0.1924 74.9 310 m – 680 m 19.44 km/s 69984 km/h
138852 (2000 WN10) 10th November 2015 8 day(s) 0.1259 49.0 240 m – 540 m 13.78 km/s 49608 km/h
(2010 XC15) 10th November 2015 8 day(s) 0.1508 58.7 140 m – 310 m 12.75 km/s 45900 km/h
(2005 UN) 12th November 2015 10 day(s) 0.1550 60.3 18 m – 39 m 8.59 km/s 30924 km/h
(2000 WP19) 15th November 2015 13 day(s) 0.0586 22.8 80 m – 180 m 10.43 km/s 37548 km/h
(2012 LA11) 16th November 2015 14 day(s) 0.0678 26.4 16 m – 36 m 4.88 km/s 17568 km/h
(2009 WN6) 18th November 2015 16 day(s) 0.1087 42.3 31 m – 68 m 10.02 km/s 36072 km/h
(2015 TO178) 18th November 2015 16 day(s) 0.0913 35.5 33 m – 75 m 6.19 km/s 22284 km/h
413577 (2005 UL5) 19th November 2015 17 day(s) 0.0153 5.9 240 m – 540 m 18.99 km/s 68364 km/h
(2002 VV17) 19th November 2015 17 day(s) 0.1582 61.6 270 m – 590 m 10.26 km/s 36936 km/h
(2005 UJ6) 20th November 2015 18 day(s) 0.1580 61.5 130 m – 300 m 17.60 km/s 63360.00000000001 km/h
(2005 EW169) 21st November 2015 19 day(s) 0.0940 36.6 400 m – 900 m 8.90 km/s 32040 km/h
(2015 RQ82) 23rd November 2015 21 day(s) 0.0739 28.7 97 m – 220 m 8.24 km/s 29664 km/h
(2011 YS62) 23rd November 2015 21 day(s) 0.0915 35.6 310 m – 680 m 14.10 km/s 50760 km/h
(2009 WB105) 24th November 2015 22 day(s) 0.0385 15.0 58 m – 130 m 18.88 km/s 67968 km/h
(2010 YC1) 26th November 2015 24 day(s) 0.1948 75.8 150 m – 330 m 14.08 km/s 50688 km/h
(2004 BG41) 26th November 2015 24 day(s) 0.0770 30.0 35 m – 78 m 10.25 km/s 36900 km/h
(2012 XA133) 26th November 2015 24 day(s) 0.1134 44.1 180 m – 390 m 26.99 km/s 97164 km/h
(2011 HJ7) 26th November 2015 24 day(s) 0.0893 34.8 100 m – 230 m 13.57 km/s 48852 km/h
(2015 LE21) 27th November 2015 25 day(s) 0.1126 43.8 31 m – 68 m 3.71 km/s 13356 km/h
163696 (2003 EB50) 28th November 2015 26 day(s) 0.1254 48.8 1.4 km – 3.1 km 23.68 km/s 85248 km/h
(2007 EA26) 28th November 2015 26 day(s) 0.1115 43.4 210 m – 470 m 8.19 km/s 29484 km/h
(1999 VN6) 29th November 2015 27 day(s) 0.1865 72.6 350 m – 780 m 12.33 km/s 44388 km/h
345722 (2007 BG29) 30th November 2015 28 day(s) 0.1390 54.1 670 m – 1.5 km 11.26 km/s 40536 km/h
(2014 WM7) 30th November 2015 28 day(s) 0.0796 31.0 51 m – 110 m 10.08 km/s 36288 km/h
(2005 XT77) 01st December 2015 29 day(s) 0.1679 65.3 180 m – 390 m 9.70 km/s 34920 km/h
1 AU = ~150 million kilometers,1 LD = Lunar Distance = ~384,000 kilometers Source: NASA-NEO

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Notes: LD means “Lunar Distance.” 1 LD = 384,401 km, the distance between Earth and the Moon. 1 LD also equals 0.00256 AU. MAG is the visual magnitude of the asteroid on the date of closest approach.

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