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Waking Times

December 17, 2015

Pharmaceutical Marketing Supported by Deceitful Clinical Research

Medical Research

Alex Pietrowski, Staff
Waking Times

 

The business model for bringing lucrative new pharmaceutical drugs to market includes very robust marketing budgets, and 9 out of 10 pharmaceutical companies spend more on advertising than they do on research. And why not? Americans spend an average of $1000 per person, per year on pharmaceutical drugs, and the effort to capture these dollars is leading more companies to fast track or even fabricate the research involved in bringing a new drug to market.

Here’s a look at how much the largest pharmaceutical companies spent on marketing vs. expenditures on research and development in 2013:

The push to push drugs on the American people is heavily dependent on the ability to produce favorable research that backs any and all claims that marketing departments wish to make about the drug in order for it to stand out in the competitive field of retail drug sales. Thanks to the admissions of some of the most influential people in this industry, we are now discovering that much of the research being presented in support of many new drugs, vaccines and procedures is fake, and even leading medical journals are agreeing that big pharma manipulates medical research at the expense of public health.Consider the following statements and admissions by very important people who are close enough to the inner workings of the industry to know for sure just how bad the public is being deceived.

In 2015, the editor of one of the world’s most respected medical journals, The Lancet, went public with his admission that research fraud was rampant in the field of medical clinical research:

 

The following clip is from the documentary ‘One More Girl,’ about the startlingly damaging effects of the Gardasil vaccine. In the clip, former Pfizer Vice President, Dr. Peter Rost candidly discusses the truth about the influence of money in the pharmaceutical industry. Dr. Rost wrote the book, The Whistleblower, Confessions of a Healthcare Hitman to contribute to the growing body of evidence that blows the whistle on corporate fraud within the medical establishment.

Dependence on so-called clinical research to support the claims made by pharmaceutical marketing departments is proving to be dangerously misled. Can the public trust the medical establishment to bring effective and safe medicines to market? Increasingly, the evidence is suggesting that it is not.

 

Read More Here

 

 

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Chicago Tribune

Commentary:

Should you put your trust in medical research?

Cory Franklin
Medical studies are on track to become the “reality television” of science.

A friend of mine, a physician with 30 years of experience in medical research who has published in the world’s top medical journals, recently said to me, “I don’t believe most of the studies published in the medical literature anymore.” His candid skepticism was because he feels medical researchers are losing the trust of the public.

Trust is an essential ingredient of medical research. The accelerating erosion of trust in the biomedical literature that my friend noted is the result of several factors: fraud, conflicts of interest, and inadequate scientific and journalistic peer review. These malign influences have corrupted scientific literature for generations, but their current manifestations are particularly acute in medical research.

Last month, fraud came to the fore when the prestigious journal Science retracted a prominent paper on gay marriage after the lead author lied about certain features of the study. This high-profile retraction was only the latest evidence that fraud has become depressingly common in the biomedical literature. A review of more than 2,000 articles retracted by major journals revealed that more than two-thirds were retracted because of some type of fraud. Moreover, the percentage of articles retracted because of fraud is roughly 10 times higher than it was in 1975.

While some of this may be because of greater scrutiny, an increase of that magnitude should not be ignored because the consequences of fraud in the medical literature can be devastating. Consider two examples: The current movement against vaccination for children stemmed — in large part — from a well-publicized but fraudulent 1998 paper in The Lancet. In another case, as many as 40,000 women were treated for breast cancer with bone marrow transplants in the 1990s at a cost of billions of dollars. This treatment was based on studies revealed to be fraudulent. Bone marrow transplant, effective for certain blood disorders, turned out to be not only relatively ineffective for breast cancer, but often dangerous.

 

Read More Here

 

 

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