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Weather Underground

November 9, 2015

Tropical Storm Kate is strengthening as it moves away from the Bahamas. This trend is expected to continue due to warm sea surface temperatures and low vertical wind shear.

Kate is not a direct threat to the United States.

(MORE: Follow Tropical Storm Kate With Our Interactive Storm Tracker)

Highlights:

  • Tropical Storm Kate was centered 175 miles north-northeast of the northwestern Bahamas as of Monday night.
  • All tropical storm warnings have been discontinued.
  • The threat of heavy rain and gusty winds in the Bahamas are diminishing.
  • High surf will continue to impact eastward-facing beaches in the northwestern Bahamas.
  • Tropical Storm Kate is not expected to make landfall in the U.S.
  • The latest forecast calls for Kate to become a strong tropical storm and possibly a hurricane before eventually being absorbed by a non-tropical low pressure system midweek as it moves out to sea.
  • Kate is the eleventh named storm of the 2015 Atlantic hurricane season.
  • Kate originally formed as Tropical Depression Twelve Sunday night, and was upgraded to tropical storm status Monday morning.

 

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Tropical Storm Kate formed Monday morning in the Atlantic Ocean near the Bahamas, the National Hurricane Center said. It is unlikely to directly impact the U.S.

As of 1 p.m. ET, the storm had maximum sustained winds of 45 mph and was located 30 miles east-southeast of Eleuthera Island in the Bahamas. Kate was moving to the northwest at 15 mph.

Rain squalls accompanying Kate will graze the eastern islands of the Bahamas into Monday night, AccuWeather said. Tropical storm warnings have been hoisted for portions of the central and western Bahamas, the hurricane center reported.

 

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