Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

H7N9 infection is transmitted to humans by direct exposure to infected live or dead poultry or birds, or indirectly through exposure to environments contaminated by infected poultry or birds, such as in a farmyard or market setting. There is currently no evidence of sustained human-to-human transmission of the virus.

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February 12 2014 12:45 PM Biological Hazard Malaysia State of Sabah, Sandakan Damage level Details

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Biological Hazard in Malaysia on Wednesday, 12 February, 2014 at 12:45 (12:45 PM) UTC.

Description
The Ministry of Health in Malaysia (MOH) is reporting an imported case of H7N9 avian influenza in a 67-year-old female tourist to Sabah, according to a MOH press release dated Feb. 12 (computer translated). Investigations revealed that the case had received initial treatment in China for symptoms of fever , cough , runny nose , joint pain and fatigue begin January 30, 2014 , four (4) days before he arrived in Kuala Lumpur on February 3, 2014 . He left on February 4, 2014 and was in Sandakan until February 6, 2014 . Next , he went to Kota Kinabalu on February 6, 2014. On February 7, 2014 , the case is getting weaker and sought treatment at a private clinic before being referred to the district hospital . On the same day , the case was transferred to a private hospital at the request of family members. Screening tests were performed for the first sample suspected Avian Influenza A ( H7N9 ) on February 9, 2014 and the second confirmatory test samples tested positive on February 11, 2014 . Until now , the case is still receiving treatment at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU ) of the hospital and is in stable condition . Ministry of Health Malaysia has implemented control measures and reasonable precautions include improving the management of infection control in hospitals. Contact detection of 16 members of the group and 4 employees resorts that have close contact ( close contact) with all cases found to be in good health. Malaysia joins Taiwan and Hong Kong as countries with imported H7N9 avian influenza.
Biohazard name: H7N9 – Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus
Biohazard level: 4/4 Hazardous
Biohazard desc.: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, H5N1(bird flu), Dengue hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic or unidentified diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 (P4) lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

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MOH closely monitoring Malaysia’s H7N9 situation

H7N9 infection is transmitted to humans by direct exposure to infected live or dead poultry or birds, or indirectly through exposure to environments contaminated by infected poultry or birds, such as in a farmyard or market setting. There is currently no evidence of sustained human-to-human transmission of the virus.
Thursday, Feb 13, 2014
YourHealth, AsiaOne

SINGAPORE – The Ministry of Health (MOH) Singapore said it is in close contact with its Malaysian counterparts and is monitoring the situation following an annoucement by the Ministry of Health Malaysia of its first imported human case of avian influenza A/H7N9 in Kota Kinabalu.

A 67-year-old Chinese national who had travelled to Malaysia from Guangdong was tested positive for H7N9 after she complained of fever, cough, body aches and fatigue.

The Singapore Health Ministry said that the public health risk to Singapore remains low as the characteristics of H7N9 in human infections have not changed.

H7N9 infection is transmitted to humans by direct exposure to infected live or dead poultry or birds, or indirectly through exposure to environments contaminated by infected poultry or birds, such as in a farmyard or market setting. There is currently no evidence of sustained human-to-human transmission of the virus, MOH said.

In a media statement, the Health Ministry said that Singapore’s hospitals “remain vigilant to test for H7N9 and other avian influenza where clinically indicated, such as in patients with serious respiratory illness and a compatible travel history.”

“All suspected and confirmed cases will be isolated. In addition, if a case is detected, MOH will conduct contact tracing and all close contacts will be placed under surveillance.”

Health advisories have been put in place at Singapore’s border checkpoints for incoming travellers from areas affected by avian influenza, as well as for outgoing travellers to these affected areas.

Read More Here

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