Tag Archive: Soil


 

missingsky102 missingsky102

Published on Jan 24, 2014

In Fukushima, massive amounts of radioactive soil and debris are still piled up in residential areas. The government has asked the head of local authorities to accept intermediate storage facilities. In this episode we look at what is hampering the project.

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Earth Watch Report  -  Hazmat

  • Firefighters clean up a radioactive spill at a work site in Cliftleigh between Heddon Greta and Testers Hollow on Monday afternoon. Photo by Marina Neil Firefighters clean up a radioactive spill at a work site in Cliftleigh between Heddon Greta and Testers Hollow on Monday afternoon. Photo by Marina Neil

View Additional Photos Here

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HAZMAT Australia State of New South Wales, Cliftleigh Damage level Details

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HAZMAT in Australia on Monday, 20 January, 2014 at 10:02 (10:02 AM) UTC.

Description
A radioactive substance has been released into the soil at a new housing development in Cliftleigh. Six fire crews were called to the housing estate off Main Road at 5.30pm yesterday after a bulldozer ran over a densometer and smashed it and its radioactive substance into the ground. A densometer is a probe used in geotechnical engineering and it had been put in the ground to determine the depth of the soil. Firefighters said the device contained a small radioactive isotope which had broken during the impact from the earth moving machine. Firefighters wore protective gear and used specific equipment to measure the level of radioactive activity in the soil. They then treated the incident using HAZMAT techniques. Police were also called to the incident and set up an exclusion zone around the estate. One resident who witnessed the clean up, but did not want to be identified, said it was concerning that the radioactive substance had entered the soil. She was worried about the impact it would have on the environment. Another resident was worried the substance might have already damaged the soil.

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Newcastle Herald

Crushed device raises radiation fear in Cliftleigh

  • Firefighters clean up a radioactive spill at a work site in Cliftleigh between Heddon Greta and Testers Hollow on Monday afternoon. Photo by Marina Neil Firefighters clean up a radioactive spill at a work site in Cliftleigh between Heddon Greta and Testers Hollow on Monday afternoon. Photo by Marina Neil

A RADIOACTIVE substance has been released into the soil at a new housing development in Cliftleigh.

Six fire crews were called to the housing estate off Main Road at 5.30pm yesterday after a bulldozer ran over a densometer and smashed it and its radioactive substance into the ground.

A densometer is a probe used in geotechnical engineering and it had been put in the ground to determine the depth of the soil.

Firefighters said the device contained a small radioactive isotope that had broken during the impact from the earthmoving machine.

Read More Here

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FARM NEWS

Plant production could decline as climate change affects soil nutrients

 

 


The cliff face of Cedar Mesa, in southeast Utah, overlooks one of many sites sampled in the world’s drylands.

 

by Staff Writers
Flagstaff AZ (SPX) Nov 04, 2013


As drylands of the world become even drier, water will not be the only resource in short supply. Levels of nutrients in the soil will likely be affected, and their imbalance could affect the lives of one-fifth of the world’s population.

That includes people living in Arizona, who may be in for a dustier future.

The findings are presented in a study published in Nature that details how soil changes may occur and discusses the implications. Co-author Matthew Bowker, assistant professor of forest soils and ecosystem ecology at Northern Arizona University, was involved with the project since 2009.

Bowker explained that most of the 17 nutrients that plants need to grow to their potential are soil resources, such as nitrogen and phosphorus. The statistical model he helped develop for the study suggests that as the climate becomes more arid, nitrogen will decrease and phosphorus will increase.

“Both are essential for plant growth, and both are typical components of fertilizer, but both need to be around in the right quantities for plant growth to proceed most efficiently,” Bowker said.

 

Read More here

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Caution 

Music at the  beginning of the  video  is extremely  loud so please be sure  to  lower  your  volume settings  as I  have no  control over the settings  used to  create  the  original  video.

~Desert Rose~

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medfaxx medfaxx

Uploaded on Apr 27, 2009

Healthier more robust plants, better drainage, improved uptake of nutrients, preserves beneficial living organisms, more organic matter, more humus, better water infiltration, holds more water, break down and recycle soil nutrients.
Video by Dr. Milton Ganyard at HerbFest to benefit the Graham Johnson Cultural Arts Endowment, http://www.gjcae.org.

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MOTHER EARTH NEWS

Manage these vigorous self-seeders so you’ll never have to buy seeds again.

By Barbara Pleasant
August/September 2010

self-seeding crops
Letting crops flower and go to seed also supports beneficial insects!
ILLUSTRATION: ELAYNE SEARS

One of the characteristics of a truly sustainable garden is that it produces at least some of its own seed. This is most often done when gardeners select, harvest and store seeds until the proper time for planting the following year. But some self-seeding crops produce seeds so readily that as long as you give them time to flower and mature, and set seed, you will always have free plants growing in your garden. You can simply let the seeds fall where they are, or toss pieces of the seed heads into the corners of your garden, or whichever area you want them in — no harvesting, storing or replanting required. With most self-seeding vegetables, herbs and annual flowers, you’ll just need to learn to recognize the seedlings so you don’t hoe them down. Should seedlings require relocation, you can simply lift and move them — after all, they are sturdy field-grown seedlings.

In addition to getting all the free garden plants you need (and some to share with family and friends), nurturing self-seeders is also a great way to provide a diversity of flowers that supply pollen and nectar for beneficial insects. Self-seeding flowers, herbs and vegetables that show up in early spring include arugula, calendula, chamomile, cilantro, dill, breadseed poppies and brilliant red orach (mountain spinach). Nasturtiums, amaranth, New Zealand spinach, and even basil or zinnias appear later, after the soil has warmed.

Starting a new colony of any of these annuals is usually a simple matter of lopping off armloads of brittle, seedbearing stems in the fall, and dumping them where you want the plants to appear the next season. It’s that easy. Most of the seedlings will appear in the first year after you let seed-bearing plants drop their seeds, with lower numbers popping up in subsequent seasons.

Working with reseeding, or self-sowing, crops saves time and trouble and often gives excellent results, but a few special techniques and precautions are in order. Some plants that self-sow too freely — especially perennials such as garlic chives or horseradish — will cross the line into weediness if not handled with care.

Spring Seeds for Fall Crops

The first group of plants to try as self-sown crops — both because they’re the easiest and they’ll be ready the same year — are those that tend to bolt in late spring. If allowed to bloom and set seed, dill, radishes, arugula, cilantro, broccoli raab, turnips and any kind of mustard will produce ripe seeds in time for fall reseeding in most climates. Lettuce will take a little longer, but often gives good results in Zone 5 or warmer.

One way to encourage self-seeders is to select vigorous plants from a larger planting, and let these plants grow unharvested until they bloom and produce seeds. This will work well enough, but it’s often bothersome to have one lone turnip holding up the renovation of a planting bed. To get around this problem, use a Noah’s ark approach: Set aside a bed or row and transplant pairs of plants being grown for seed into the ark bed. As the weeks pass, weed, water and stake up seed-bearing branches to keep them clean, but don’t pick from the “seed ark” bed.

Read More  Here

 

 

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