Tag Archive: New Caledonia


The Telegraph

‘Tsunami bomb’ tested off New Zealand coast

Photo: ALAMY

The tests were carried out in waters around New Caledonia and Auckland during the Second World War and showed that the weapon was feasible and a series of 10 large offshore blasts could potentially create a 33-foot tsunami capable of inundating a small city.

The top secret operation, code-named “Project Seal”, tested the doomsday device as a possible rival to the nuclear bomb. About 3,700 bombs were exploded during the tests, first in New Caledonia and later at Whangaparaoa Peninsula, near Auckland.

The plans came to light during research by a New Zealand author and film-maker, Ray Waru, who examined military files buried in the national archives.

“Presumably if the atomic bomb had not worked as well as it did, we might have been tsunami-ing people,” said Mr Waru.

“It was absolutely astonishing. First that anyone would come up with the idea of developing a weapon of mass destruction based on a tsunami … and also that New Zealand seems to have successfully developed it to the degree that it might have worked.” The project was launched in June 1944 after a US naval officer, E A Gibson, noticed that blasting operations to clear coral reefs around Pacific islands sometimes produced a large wave, raising the possibility of creating a “tsunami bomb”.

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Earth Watch Report  –  Earthquake

 photo Vanuatu-50and48magEQsJune6th2013_zpsae1f7a53.jpg

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M5.0 – 68km ENE of Norsup, Vanuatu

 2013-06-07 08:46:57 UTC

Earthquake location 15.754°S, 167.940°E

Event Time

  1. 2013-06-07 08:46:57 UTC
  2. 2013-06-07 19:46:57 UTC+11:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-06-07 03:46:57 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

15.754°S 167.940°E depth=201.3km (125.1mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 68km (42mi) ENE of Norsup, Vanuatu
  2. 86km (53mi) ESE of Luganville, Vanuatu
  3. 222km (138mi) N of Port-Vila, Vanuatu
  4. 575km (357mi) N of We, New Caledonia
  5. 725km (450mi) NNE of Dumbea, New Caledonia

….

M4.8 – 278km SW of Vaini, Tonga

2013-06-07 09:09:48 UTC

Earthquake location 22.944°S, 177.139°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-06-07 09:09:48 UTC
  2. 2013-06-06 21:09:48 UTC-12:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-06-07 04:09:48 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

22.944°S 177.139°W depth=179.3km (111.4mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 278km (173mi) SW of Vaini, Tonga
  2. 283km (176mi) SW of Nuku`alofa, Tonga
  3. 703km (437mi) SE of Suva, Fiji
  4. 804km (500mi) SE of Nadi, Fiji
  5. 809km (503mi) SSE of Lambasa, Fiji

….

Tectonic Summary

Seismotectonics of the Eastern Margin of the Australia Plate

The eastern margin of the Australia plate is one of the most sesimically active areas of the world due to high rates of convergence between the Australia and Pacific plates. In the region of New Zealand, the 3000 km long Australia-Pacific plate boundary extends from south of Macquarie Island to the southern Kermadec Island chain. It includes an oceanic transform (the Macquarie Ridge), two oppositely verging subduction zones (Puysegur and Hikurangi), and a transpressive continental transform, the Alpine Fault through South Island, New Zealand.

Since 1900 there have been 15 M7.5+ earthquakes recorded near New Zealand. Nine of these, and the four largest, occurred along or near the Macquarie Ridge, including the 1989 M8.2 event on the ridge itself, and the 2004 M8.1 event 200 km to the west of the plate boundary, reflecting intraplate deformation. The largest recorded earthquake in New Zealand itself was the 1931 M7.8 Hawke’s Bay earthquake, which killed 256 people. The last M7.5+ earthquake along the Alpine Fault was 170 years ago; studies of the faults’ strain accumulation suggest that similar events are likely to occur again.

North of New Zealand, the Australia-Pacific boundary stretches east of Tonga and Fiji to 250 km south of Samoa. For 2,200 km the trench is approximately linear, and includes two segments where old (>120 Myr) Pacific oceanic lithosphere rapidly subducts westward (Kermadec and Tonga). At the northern end of the Tonga trench, the boundary curves sharply westward and changes along a 700 km-long segment from trench-normal subduction, to oblique subduction, to a left lateral transform-like structure.

Australia-Pacific convergence rates increase northward from 60 mm/yr at the southern Kermadec trench to 90 mm/yr at the northern Tonga trench; however, significant back arc extension (or equivalently, slab rollback) causes the consumption rate of subducting Pacific lithosphere to be much faster. The spreading rate in the Havre trough, west of the Kermadec trench, increases northward from 8 to 20 mm/yr. The southern tip of this spreading center is propagating into the North Island of New Zealand, rifting it apart. In the southern Lau Basin, west of the Tonga trench, the spreading rate increases northward from 60 to 90 mm/yr, and in the northern Lau Basin, multiple spreading centers result in an extension rate as high as 160 mm/yr. The overall subduction velocity of the Pacific plate is the vector sum of Australia-Pacific velocity and back arc spreading velocity: thus it increases northward along the Kermadec trench from 70 to 100 mm/yr, and along the Tonga trench from 150 to 240 mm/yr.

The Kermadec-Tonga subduction zone generates many large earthquakes on the interface between the descending Pacific and overriding Australia plates, within the two plates themselves and, less frequently, near the outer rise of the Pacific plate east of the trench. Since 1900, 40 M7.5+ earthquakes have been recorded, mostly north of 30°S. However, it is unclear whether any of the few historic M8+ events that have occurred close to the plate boundary were underthrusting events on the plate interface, or were intraplate earthquakes. On September 29, 2009, one of the largest normal fault (outer rise) earthquakes ever recorded (M8.1) occurred south of Samoa, 40 km east of the Tonga trench, generating a tsunami that killed at least 180 people.

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Earth Watch Report  –  Earthquakes

 photo SolomonIslands-2EQs48-57magMay15-172013_zps25afb8c0.jpg

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M4.8 – 101km SW of Lata, Solomon Islands

 2013-05-15 23:01:16 UTC

Earthquake location 11.303°S, 165.115°E

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-15 23:01:16 UTC
  2. 2013-05-16 10:01:16 UTC+11:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-15 18:01:16 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

11.303°S 165.115°E depth=7.3km (4.5mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 101km (63mi) SW of Lata, Solomon Islands
  2. 518km (322mi) NNW of Luganville, Vanuatu
  3. 602km (374mi) ESE of Honiara, Solomon Islands
  4. 790km (491mi) NNW of Port-Vila, Vanuatu
  5. 1088km (676mi) NNW of We, New Caledonia

 

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M5.7 – 91km WSW of Lata, Solomon Islands

 2013-05-17 06:43:16 UTC

Earthquake location 11.085°S, 165.082°E

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-17 06:43:16 UTC
  2. 2013-05-17 17:43:16 UTC+11:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-17 01:43:16 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

11.085°S 165.082°E depth=10.3km (6.4mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 91km (57mi) WSW of Lata, Solomon Islands
  2. 541km (336mi) NNW of Luganville, Vanuatu
  3. 591km (367mi) ESE of Honiara, Solomon Islands
  4. 814km (506mi) NNW of Port-Vila, Vanuatu
  5. 1112km (691mi) NNW of We, New Caledonia

 

 

….

Tectonic Summary

Seismotectonics of the Eastern Margin of the Australia Plate

The eastern margin of the Australia plate is one of the most sesimically active areas of the world due to high rates of convergence between the Australia and Pacific plates. In the region of New Zealand, the 3000 km long Australia-Pacific plate boundary extends from south of Macquarie Island to the southern Kermadec Island chain. It includes an oceanic transform (the Macquarie Ridge), two oppositely verging subduction zones (Puysegur and Hikurangi), and a transpressive continental transform, the Alpine Fault through South Island, New Zealand.

Since 1900 there have been 15 M7.5+ earthquakes recorded near New Zealand. Nine of these, and the four largest, occurred along or near the Macquarie Ridge, including the 1989 M8.2 event on the ridge itself, and the 2004 M8.1 event 200 km to the west of the plate boundary, reflecting intraplate deformation. The largest recorded earthquake in New Zealand itself was the 1931 M7.8 Hawke’s Bay earthquake, which killed 256 people. The last M7.5+ earthquake along the Alpine Fault was 170 years ago; studies of the faults’ strain accumulation suggest that similar events are likely to occur again.

North of New Zealand, the Australia-Pacific boundary stretches east of Tonga and Fiji to 250 km south of Samoa. For 2,200 km the trench is approximately linear, and includes two segments where old (>120 Myr) Pacific oceanic lithosphere rapidly subducts westward (Kermadec and Tonga). At the northern end of the Tonga trench, the boundary curves sharply westward and changes along a 700 km-long segment from trench-normal subduction, to oblique subduction, to a left lateral transform-like structure.

Australia-Pacific convergence rates increase northward from 60 mm/yr at the southern Kermadec trench to 90 mm/yr at the northern Tonga trench; however, significant back arc extension (or equivalently, slab rollback) causes the consumption rate of subducting Pacific lithosphere to be much faster. The spreading rate in the Havre trough, west of the Kermadec trench, increases northward from 8 to 20 mm/yr. The southern tip of this spreading center is propagating into the North Island of New Zealand, rifting it apart. In the southern Lau Basin, west of the Tonga trench, the spreading rate increases northward from 60 to 90 mm/yr, and in the northern Lau Basin, multiple spreading centers result in an extension rate as high as 160 mm/yr. The overall subduction velocity of the Pacific plate is the vector sum of Australia-Pacific velocity and back arc spreading velocity: thus it increases northward along the Kermadec trench from 70 to 100 mm/yr, and along the Tonga trench from 150 to 240 mm/yr.

The Kermadec-Tonga subduction zone generates many large earthquakes on the interface between the descending Pacific and overriding Australia plates, within the two plates themselves and, less frequently, near the outer rise of the Pacific plate east of the trench. Since 1900, 40 M7.5+ earthquakes have been recorded, mostly north of 30°S. However, it is unclear whether any of the few historic M8+ events that have occurred close to the plate boundary were underthrusting events on the plate interface, or were intraplate earthquakes. On September 29, 2009, one of the largest normal fault (outer rise) earthquakes ever recorded (M8.1) occurred south of Samoa, 40 km east of the Tonga trench, generating a tsunami that killed at least 180 people.

 

 

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Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

 

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Earth Watch Report  –  Earthquakes

Vanuatu  -  4.6 mag EQ May  10th  2013 photo Vanuatu-46magEQMay10th2013_zpsd0723036.jpg
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M4.6 – 42km SE of Port-Vila, Vanuatu 2013-05-10 11:18:41 UTC



Earthquake location 17.981°S, 168.629°E

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-10 11:18:41 UTC
  2. 2013-05-10 22:18:41 UTC+11:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-10 06:18:41 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

17.981°S 168.629°E depth=145.7km (90.5mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 42km (26mi) SE of Port-Vila, Vanuatu
  2. 312km (194mi) SSE of Luganville, Vanuatu
  3. 355km (221mi) NNE of We, New Caledonia
  4. 514km (319mi) NNE of Dumbea, New Caledonia
  5. 42km (26mi) SE of Port-Vila, Vanuatu

….

Tectonic Summary

Seismotectonics of the Eastern Margin of the Australia Plate

The eastern margin of the Australia plate is one of the most sesimically active areas of the world due to high rates of convergence between the Australia and Pacific plates. In the region of New Zealand, the 3000 km long Australia-Pacific plate boundary extends from south of Macquarie Island to the southern Kermadec Island chain. It includes an oceanic transform (the Macquarie Ridge), two oppositely verging subduction zones (Puysegur and Hikurangi), and a transpressive continental transform, the Alpine Fault through South Island, New Zealand.

Since 1900 there have been 15 M7.5+ earthquakes recorded near New Zealand. Nine of these, and the four largest, occurred along or near the Macquarie Ridge, including the 1989 M8.2 event on the ridge itself, and the 2004 M8.1 event 200 km to the west of the plate boundary, reflecting intraplate deformation. The largest recorded earthquake in New Zealand itself was the 1931 M7.8 Hawke’s Bay earthquake, which killed 256 people. The last M7.5+ earthquake along the Alpine Fault was 170 years ago; studies of the faults’ strain accumulation suggest that similar events are likely to occur again.

North of New Zealand, the Australia-Pacific boundary stretches east of Tonga and Fiji to 250 km south of Samoa. For 2,200 km the trench is approximately linear, and includes two segments where old (>120 Myr) Pacific oceanic lithosphere rapidly subducts westward (Kermadec and Tonga). At the northern end of the Tonga trench, the boundary curves sharply westward and changes along a 700 km-long segment from trench-normal subduction, to oblique subduction, to a left lateral transform-like structure.

Australia-Pacific convergence rates increase northward from 60 mm/yr at the southern Kermadec trench to 90 mm/yr at the northern Tonga trench; however, significant back arc extension (or equivalently, slab rollback) causes the consumption rate of subducting Pacific lithosphere to be much faster. The spreading rate in the Havre trough, west of the Kermadec trench, increases northward from 8 to 20 mm/yr. The southern tip of this spreading center is propagating into the North Island of New Zealand, rifting it apart. In the southern Lau Basin, west of the Tonga trench, the spreading rate increases northward from 60 to 90 mm/yr, and in the northern Lau Basin, multiple spreading centers result in an extension rate as high as 160 mm/yr. The overall subduction velocity of the Pacific plate is the vector sum of Australia-Pacific velocity and back arc spreading velocity: thus it increases northward along the Kermadec trench from 70 to 100 mm/yr, and along the Tonga trench from 150 to 240 mm/yr.

The Kermadec-Tonga subduction zone generates many large earthquakes on the interface between the descending Pacific and overriding Australia plates, within the two plates themselves and, less frequently, near the outer rise of the Pacific plate east of the trench. Since 1900, 40 M7.5+ earthquakes have been recorded, mostly north of 30°S. However, it is unclear whether any of the few historic M8+ events that have occurred close to the plate boundary were underthrusting events on the plate interface, or were intraplate earthquakes. On September 29, 2009, one of the largest normal fault (outer rise) earthquakes ever recorded (M8.1) occurred south of Samoa, 40 km east of the Tonga trench, generating a tsunami that killed at least 180 people.

….

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Earth Watch Report  –  Earthquakes

6.1 104km W of Port-Vila, Vanuatu 2013-02-28 03:09:44 17.771°S 167.341°E 15.1

M6.1 – 104km W of Port-Vila, Vanuatu 2013-02-28 03:09:44 UTC

Earthquake location 17.771°S, 167.341°E

Event Time

  1. 2013-02-28 03:09:44 UTC
  2. 2013-02-28 14:09:44 UTC+11:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-02-27 21:09:44 UTC-06:00 system time

Location

17.771°S 167.341°E depth=15.1km (9.4mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 104km (65mi) W of Port-Vila, Vanuatu
  2. 248km (154mi) S of Luganville, Vanuatu
  3. 348km (216mi) N of We, New Caledonia
  4. 493km (306mi) N of Dumbea, New Caledonia
  5. 104km (65mi) W of Port-Vila, Vanuatu

 

Earth Watch Report  –  Tsunami

2 Today Tsunami Solomon Islands [Santa Cruz Island coastal area] Damage level
Details

Tsunami in Solomon Islands on Wednesday, 06 February, 2013 at 05:28 (05:28 AM) UTC.

Description
A powerful earthquake off the Solomon Islands generated a tsunami of up to 1.5 meters (about 5 feet) that damaged dozens of homes in the South Pacific island chain Wednesday, but authorities canceled warnings for tsunamis on more distant coasts. There were no initial reports of deaths or injuries. Solomons officials reported two 1.5-meter (4 foot, 11-inch) waves hit the western side of Santa Cruz Island, damaging around 50 homes and properties, said George Herming, a spokesman for the prime minister. Many villagers had headed to higher ground as a precaution, Herming said. The tsunami formed after an 8.0-magnitude earthquake struck near Lata on Santa Cruz in Temotu province, the easternmost province of the Solomons, about a 3-hour flight from the capital, Honiara. The region has a population of around 30,000 people. In Honiara, the warnings had prompted residents to flee for higher ground. “People are still standing on the hills outside of Honiara just looking out over the water, trying to observe if there is a wave coming in,” Herming said. So far, he had received no reports that a wave had been spotted in Honiara. Atenia Tahu, who works for the Solomon Islands Broadcasting Corp. in Honiara, said most people were remaining calm. “People around the coast and in the capital are ringing in and trying to get information from us and the National Disaster Office and are slowly moving up to higher ground,” Tahu said. “But panic? No, no, no, people are not panicking.”

Tsunami in Solomon Islands on Wednesday, 06 February, 2013 at 05:28 (05:28 AM) UTC.

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Updated: Wednesday, 06 February, 2013 at 12:39 UTC
Description
A powerful 8.0 magnitude earthquake set off a tsunami that killed at least five people in a remote part of the Solomon Islands on Wednesday and triggered evacuations across the South Pacific as island nations issued tsunami alerts. The quake struck 340 km (211 miles) east of Kira Kira in the Solomons, the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center in Hawaii said as it issued warnings for the Solomons and other South Pacific nations including Australia and New Zealand. It later canceled the warnings for the outlying regions. A tsunami measuring 0.9 metres (three feet) hit near the town of Lata on the remote Santa Cruz island, swamping some villages and the town’s main airport as people fled to safety on higher ground.

More than three dozen aftershocks up to magnitude 6.6 rocked the region in the hours after the quake, the U.S. Geological Survey said. Lata hospital’s director of nursing, Augustine Pilve, told New Zealand television that five people had been killed, including a boy about 10 years old, adding that more casualties were possible as officials made their way to at least three villages that may have been hit. “It’s more likely that other villages along the coast of Santa Cruz may be affected,” he said. Disaster officials in the Solomon Islands capital Honiara told the Solomon Islands Broadcasting Corp. that they believed six people were dead and that five villages had suffered damage. Solomon Islands Police Commissioner John Lansley said it was too early to fully assess the damage or casualty numbers, and said authorities hoped to send aircraft to the region on Thursday to help determine the extent of the damage. Luke Taula, a fisheries officer in Lata, said he watched the tsunami as it came in small tidal surges rather than as one large wave. “We have small waves come in, then go out again, then come back in. The waves have reached the airport terminal,” he told Reuters by telephone. The worst damage was to villages on the western side of a point that protects the main township, he said.

Today Tsunami New Caledonia North Province, Hienghene Damage level
Details

Tsunami in New Caledonia on Wednesday, 06 February, 2013 at 04:04 (04:04 AM) UTC.

Description
Tsunami wave has been observed in Hienghene, North Province, New Caledonia following the M 8.0 earthquake. The observed tsunami wave height was 55 centimetres (1.8 feet). Other information not available yet.

Today Tsunami New Caledonia Loyalty Islands, Lifou Damage level
Details

Tsunami in New Caledonia on Wednesday, 06 February, 2013 at 04:02 (04:02 AM) UTC.

Description
Tsunami wave has been observed in Luganville, Sanma Province, New Caledonia following the M 8.0 earthquake. The observed tsunami wave height was 48 centimetres (1.6 feet). Other information not available yet.

1 Today Tsunami Vanuatu Sanma Province, Luganville Damage level
Details

Tsunami in Vanuatu on Wednesday, 06 February, 2013 at 03:42 (03:42 AM) UTC.

Description
Tsunami wave has been observed in Luganville, Sanma Province, Vanatu following the M 8.0 earthquake. The observed tsunami wave height was 11 centimetres (0.4 feet). Other information not available yet.

Tsunami in Vanuatu on Wednesday, 06 February, 2013 at 03:42 (03:42 AM) UTC.

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Updated: Wednesday, 06 February, 2013 at 05:31 UTC
Description
An official at the disaster management office in Vanuatu said there were no reports of damage or injuries there.

Today Tsunami American Samoa [Lata Wharf] Damage level
Details

Tsunami in American Samoa on Wednesday, 06 February, 2013 at 03:38 (03:38 AM) UTC.

Description
Tsunami wave has been observed in Lata Wharf, Samoa following the M 8.0 earthquake. The observed tsunami wave height was 90 centimetres (3 feet). Other information not available yet.

Expanding Regional Tsunami Warning Cancellation in Santa Cruz Islands, Pacific Ocean

GuID: pacific.TSUPAC.2013.02.06.0347
Date/Time: 2013-02-06 03:47:19
Source: PTWC
Area: Pacific Ocean
Location: Santa Cruz Islands
Magnitude: M 8
Depth: 33 km
Tsunami observed: Yes, tsunami wave has been observed.

Earth Watch Report  –  Earthquakes

 

6.2 60km SW of Lata, Solomon Islands 2013-02-01 05:36:41 11.134°S 165.480°E 7.1

M6.2 – 60km SW of Lata, Solomon Islands 2013-02-01 05:36:41 UTC

Earthquake location 11.134°S, 165.480°E

Event Time

  1. 2013-02-01 05:36:41 UTC
  2. 2013-02-01 16:36:41 UTC+11:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-01-31 23:36:41 UTC-06:00 system time

Location

11.134°S 165.480°E depth=7.1km (4.4mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 60km (37mi) SW of Lata, Solomon Islands
  2. 519km (322mi) NNW of Luganville, Vanuatu
  3. 634km (394mi) ESE of Honiara, Solomon Islands
  4. 791km (492mi) NNW of Port-Vila, Vanuatu
  5. 1099km (683mi) N of We, New Caledonia

 

Earth Watch Report  –  Storms-  Disaster Management

 

 

SHAKE AND BLOW

Thousands flee floods as cyclone batters Solomon Islands

by Staff Writers
Honiara (AFP)

Thousands of people were forced to flee rapidly rising rivers in the Solomon Islands, officials said Sunday as Cyclone Freda intensified into a “destructive” force storm and headed towards New Caledonia.

Wind gusts had strengthened to more than 231 kilometres per hour (144 miles per hour, 125 knots) as Freda developed into a powerful category four storm, said Sajay Prakesh at the Nadi Tropical Cyclone Centre in Fiji.

“These winds are very destructive and can cause huge damage to infrastructure and buildings,” he told AFP.

Freda is expected to reach New Caledonia on New Year’s Day and “given its current form if it hits New Caledonia Freda will cause huge damage, as it will blow strong winds and heavy rain for six to seven hours”.

Thousands of people from riverside villages had moved to the safety of higher ground, National Disaster Management Office director Loti Yates said.

“But there have been no reports of injury,” he said.

Fishing boats and other craft were advised not to put out to sea and local flights were cancelled as the cyclone moved across the Solomons on a path towards New Caledonia.

Earlier this month Cyclone Evan strengthened to a category four cyclone and left a swathe of devastation in its wake, destroying homes, flooding rivers and stranding thousands of tourists in Fiji.

Before arriving in Fiji, it pummelled neighbouring Samoa, killing at least five.

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Earth Watch Report –  Earthquake

 

6.8

63km SSW of Sola, Vanuatu

2012-12-21 22:28:09

14.382°S

167.260°E

207.9

M6.8 – 63km SSW of Sola, Vanuatu 2012-12-21 22:28:09 UTC

Earthquake location 14.382°S, 167.260°E

Event Time

  1. 2012-12-21 22:28:09 UTC
  2. 2012-12-22 09:28:09 UTC+11:00 at epicenter
  3. 2012-12-21 16:28:09 UTC-06:00 system time

Location

14.382°S 167.260°E depth=207.9km (129.2mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 63km (39mi) SSW of Sola, Vanuatu
  2. 127km (79mi) N of Luganville, Vanuatu
  3. 387km (240mi) NNW of Port-Vila, Vanuatu
  4. 723km (449mi) N of We, New Caledonia
  5. 863km (536mi) N of Dumbea, New Caledonia

 

Earth Watch Report  – Earthquakes

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5.7

40km E of Port-Olry, Vanuatu

2012-11-17 02:51:24

15.026°S

167.426°E

128.4

….

M5.7 – 40km E of Port-Olry, Vanuatu 2012-11-17 02:51:24 UTC

Earthquake location 15.026°S, 167.426°E

Event Time

  1. 2012-11-17 02:51:24 UTC
  2. 2012-11-17 13:51:24 UTC+11:00 at epicenter
  3. 2012-11-16 20:51:24 UTC-06:00 system time

Location

15.026°S 167.426°E depth=128.4km (79.8mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 40km (25mi) E of Port-Olry, Vanuatu
  2. 62km (39mi) NNE of Luganville, Vanuatu
  3. 314km (195mi) NNW of Port-Vila, Vanuatu
  4. 652km (405mi) N of We, New Caledonia
  5. 794km (493mi) N of Paita, New Caledonia

….

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