Tag Archive: HONG KONG


Earth Watch  Report  -  Biological Hazards

H7N9 Virus Origin Diagram expanded

"This

This diagram depicts the origins of the H7N9 virus from China and shows how the virus’s genes came from other influenza viruses in birds.

…..

Biological Hazard China Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, Hong Kong Damage level Details

 

…..

RSOE EDIS

Biological Hazard in China on Monday, 14 April, 2014 at 02:59 (02:59 AM) UTC.

Description
The Hong Kong Centre for Health Protection (CHP) of the Department of Health (DH) is   investigating an imported human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) affecting a woman aged 85. The patient, with underlying medical conditions, traveled to Dongguan from April 4 to 5 with her husband and younger brother. They lived at their relatives’ home where their relatives have reared chickens. The patient also visited a wet market near their home there and helped in slaughtering chickens at home on April 4. She returned to Hong Kong on April 5, and developed fever, cough with blood-stained sputum and shortness of breath since April 11. She was sent to the Accident and Emergency Department of Tseung Kwan O Hospital (TKOH) by ambulance today and was subsequently admitted. She is currently managed under isolation and her condition is critical. Her respiratory specimen was positive for avian influenza A(H7N9) virus upon preliminary laboratory testing by the CHP’s Public Health Laboratory Services Branch today. This is the 10th imported human H7N9 avian flu case to date. Initial investigation revealed that the patient had visited her husband at Haven of Hope Hospital (HHH) on April 10 who was admitted due to other illness. Her husband has remained asymptomatic so far and is currently under observation at HHH. Apart from her husband, seven other family members of the patient are also considered as close contacts. One of them had sore throat since April 12 and his condition is stable. The other close contacts have remained asymptomatic so far. These close contacts will be admitted to hospital for observation and their respiratory specimens will be taken for preliminary laboratory testing. The CHP’s investigations and tracing of other contacts are ongoing. The patient’s brother who traveled to Dongguan with the patient, relevant healthcare workers, ambulance staff and patients who had stayed in the same cubicle with the patient’s husband at HHH are being traced for exposure assessment and medical surveillance.
Biohazard name: H7N9 – Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus
Biohazard level: 4/4 Hazardous
Biohazard desc.: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, H5N1(bird flu), Dengue hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic or unidentified diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 (P4) lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

 

…..

Traditional Chinese Simplified Chinese Email this article news.gov.hk
Imported human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) under CHP investigation
*********************************************************     The Centre for Health Protection (CHP) of the Department of Health (DH) is today (April 9) investigating an imported human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) affecting a woman aged 82.The patient, with underlying medical conditions, lives in Liwan, Guangzhou with her family. She has presented with cough with blood-stained sputum since April 7 but had no fever.

She came to Hong Kong with her two family members by car via Lok Ma Chau Spur Line Control Point yesterday (April 8). Upon arrival, she was directly transferred to the Accident and Emergency Department of North District Hospital by ambulance and was admitted for further management under isolation on the same day. Her current condition is stable.

Her sputum specimen was tested positive for avian influenza A(H7N9) virus upon preliminary laboratory testing by the CHP’s Public Health Laboratory Services Branch tonight.

The patient has been transferred to Princess Margaret Hospital for isolation and treatment.

Her exposure history to poultry is under investigation.

The CHP’s investigations and contact tracing are ongoing. The patient’s family members in Hong Kong, relevant healthcare workers, ambulance staff and immigration officer at Lok Ma Chau Spur Line Control Point are being traced for exposure assessment and medical surveillance.

“The Serious Response Level under the Government’s Preparedness Plan for Influenza Pandemic remains activated and the CHP’s follow-up actions are in full swing,” a spokesman for the CHP remarked.

This is the ninth confirmed human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) in Hong Kong. The CHP will notify the World Health Organization (WHO), the National Health and Family Planning Commission as well as health and quarantine authorities of Guangdong and Macau.

Locally, enhanced surveillance of suspected cases in public and private hospitals is underway. The CHP will continue to maintain liaison with the WHO, the Mainland and overseas health authorities to monitor the latest developments. Local surveillance activities will be modified upon the WHO’s recommendations.

“In view of human cases of avian influenza A(H7N9) confirmed locally and in the Mainland, further cases are expected in affected and possibly neighbouring areas. Those planning to travel outside Hong Kong should maintain good personal, environmental and food hygiene at all times,” the spokesman urged.

“All boundary control points have implemented disease prevention and control measures. Thermal imaging systems are in place for body temperature checks of inbound travellers. Random temperature checks by handheld devices have also been arranged. Suspected cases will be immediately referred to public hospitals for follow-up investigation,” the spokesman added.

Regarding health education for travellers, display of posters in departure and arrival halls, in-flight public announcements, environmental health inspection and provision of regular updates to the travel industry via meetings and correspondence are proceeding.

The spokesman advised travellers, especially those returning from avian influenza-affected areas and provinces with fever or respiratory symptoms, to immediately wear masks, seek medical attention and reveal their travel history to doctors. Healthcare professionals should pay special attention to patients who might have had contact with poultry, birds or their droppings in affected areas and provinces.

“We have enhanced publicity and health education to reinforce health advice on the prevention of avian influenza,” the spokesman said.

As of 4pm today, the CHP’s hotline (2125 1111) for public enquiries has received 217 calls since the first confirmed human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) in Hong Kong.

Members of the public should remain vigilant and take heed of the preventive advice against avian influenza below:

* Do not visit live poultry markets and farms. Avoid contact with poultry, birds and their droppings. If contact has been made, thoroughly wash hands with soap;
* Avoid entering areas where poultry may be slaughtered and contact with surfaces which might be contaminated by droppings of poultry or other animals;
* Poultry and eggs should be thoroughly cooked before eating;
* Wash hands frequently with soap, especially before touching the mouth, nose or eyes, handling food or eating; after going to the toilet or touching public installations or equipment (including escalator handrails, elevator control panels and door knobs); or when hands are dirtied by respiratory secretions after coughing or sneezing;
* Cover the nose and mouth while sneezing or coughing, hold the spit with a tissue and put it into a covered dustbin;
* Avoid crowded places and contact with fever patients; and
* Wear masks when respiratory symptoms develop or when taking care of fever patients.

The public may visit the CHP’s avian influenza page (www.chp.gov.hk/en/view_content/24244.html) and website (www.chp.gov.hk/files/pdf/global_statistics_avian_influenza_e.pdf) for more information on avian influenza-affected areas and provinces.

Ends/Wednesday, April 9, 2014
Issued at HKT 22:18

NNNN

 

…..

Traditional Chinese Simplified Chinese Email this article news.gov.hk
Imported human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) under CHP investigation
*********************************************************     The Centre for Health Protection (CHP) of the Department of Health (DH) is today (April 13) investigating an imported human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) affecting a woman aged 85.The patient, with underlying medical conditions, travelled to Dongguan from April 4 to 5 with her husband and younger brother. They lived at their relatives’ home where their relatives have reared chickens. The patient also visited a wet market near their home there and helped in slaughtering chickens at home on April 4. She returned to Hong Kong on April 5, and developed fever, cough with blood-stained sputum and shortness of breath since April 11. She was sent to the Accident and Emergency Department of Tseung Kwan O Hospital (TKOH) by ambulance today and was subsequently admitted. She is currently managed under isolation and her condition is critical.

Her respiratory specimen was positive for avian influenza A(H7N9) virus upon preliminary laboratory testing by the CHP’s Public Health Laboratory Services Branch today.

Initial investigation revealed that the patient had visited her husband at Haven of Hope Hospital (HHH) on April 10 who was admitted due to other illness. Her husband has remained asymptomatic so far and is currently under observation at HHH.

Apart from her husband, seven other family members of the patient are also considered as close contacts. One of them had sore throat since April 12 and his condition is stable. The other close contacts have remained asymptomatic so far.  These close contacts will be admitted to hospital for observation and their respiratory specimens will be taken for preliminary laboratory testing.

The CHP’s investigations and tracing of other contacts are ongoing. The patient’s brother who travelled to Dongguan with the patient, relevant healthcare workers, ambulance staff and patients who had stayed in the same cubicle with the patient’s husband at HHH are being traced for exposure assessment and medical surveillance.

The CHP will liaise with the relevant Mainland health authority to follow up on the patient’s contacts during her stay in the Mainland.

“The Serious Response Level under the Government’s Preparedness Plan for Influenza Pandemic remains activated and the CHP’s follow-up actions are in full swing,” a spokesman for the CHP remarked.

This is the tenth confirmed human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) in Hong Kong. The CHP will notify the World Health Organization (WHO), the National Health and Family Planning Commission as well as health and quarantine authorities of Guangdong and Macau.

Locally, enhanced surveillance of suspected cases in public and private hospitals is underway. The CHP will continue to maintain liaison with the WHO, the Mainland and overseas health authorities to monitor the latest developments. Local surveillance activities will be modified upon the WHO’s recommendations.

“In view of human cases of avian influenza A(H7N9) confirmed locally and in the Mainland, further cases are expected in affected and possibly neighbouring areas. Those planning to travel outside Hong Kong should maintain good personal, environmental and food hygiene at all times,” the spokesman urged.

“All boundary control points have implemented disease prevention and control measures. Thermal imaging systems are in place for body temperature checks of inbound travellers. Random temperature checks by handheld devices have also been arranged. Suspected cases will be immediately referred to public hospitals for follow-up investigation,” the spokesman added.

Regarding health education for travellers, display of posters in departure and arrival halls, in-flight public announcements, environmental health inspection and provision of regular updates to the travel industry via meetings and correspondence are proceeding.

The spokesman advised travellers, especially those returning from avian influenza-affected areas and provinces with fever or respiratory symptoms, to immediately wear masks, seek medical attention and reveal their travel history to doctors. Healthcare professionals should pay special attention to patients who might have had contact with poultry, birds or their droppings in affected areas and provinces.

“We have enhanced publicity and health education to reinforce health advice on the prevention of avian influenza,” the spokesman said.

As of 4pm on April 11, the CHP’s hotline (2125 1111) for public enquiries has received 217 calls since the first confirmed human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) in Hong Kong.

Members of the public should remain vigilant and take heed of the preventive advice against avian influenza below:

* Do not visit live poultry markets and farms. Avoid contact with poultry, birds and their droppings. If contact has been made, thoroughly wash hands with soap;
* Avoid entering areas where poultry may be slaughtered and contact with surfaces which might be contaminated by droppings of poultry or other animals;
* Poultry and eggs should be thoroughly cooked before eating;
* Wash hands frequently with soap, especially before touching the mouth, nose or eyes, handling food or eating; after going to the toilet or touching public installations or equipment (including escalator handrails, elevator control panels and door knobs); or when hands are dirtied by respiratory secretions after coughing or sneezing;
* Cover the nose and mouth while sneezing or coughing, hold the spit with a tissue and put it into a covered dustbin;
* Avoid crowded places and contact with fever patients; and
* Wear masks when respiratory symptoms develop or when taking care of fever patients.

The public may visit the CHP’s avian influenza page (www.chp.gov.hk/en/view_content/24244.html) and website (www.chp.gov.hk/files/pdf/global_statistics_avian_influenza_e.pdf) for more information on avian influenza-affected areas and provinces.

Ends/Sunday, April 13, 2014
Issued at HKT 22:39

NNNN

 

…..

Enhanced by Zemanta
About these ads

China tells US not to meddle in Hong Kong’s internal affairs

Published time: April 07, 2014 19:47

U.S. Vice President Joe Biden.(Reuters / Ints Kalnins)

U.S. Vice President Joe Biden.(Reuters / Ints Kalnins)

China has warned the United States against meddling in Hong Kong’s internal affairs after Vice President Joe Biden met with two former Hong Kong legislators who expressed concern that Beijing is tightening control over the territory.

Biden met with Anson Chan, former chief secretary and founder of pro-democracy group Hong Kong 2020, and Martin Lee – founder of Hong Kong’s opposition Democratic Party – at the White House on Friday.

During the meeting, the activists spoke out against whey they described as Beijing’s increasing control over Hong Kong. They also said they fear that only candidates picked by the central government will be allowed to take part in the 2017 chief executive vote. Lee and Chan also voiced concerns over press freedom in Hong Kong – referring to violent assaults on journalists and alleging that Beijing is pressuring advertisers to shun critical media, AFP reported.

Vice President Biden underscored Washington’s “long-standing support for democracy in Hong Kong and for the city’s high degree of autonomy under the ‘one country, two systems’ framework,” the White House said in a statement.

In response, China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs said that it “firmly opposes any countries meddling in the city’s internal affairs in any way,” South China Morning Post quoted.

Hong Kong affairs are China’s internal affairs,” said a spokesperson for the Office of the Commissioner of the Foreign Ministry in Hong Kong.

The official added that Hong Kong is currently going through a sensitive political reform period.

[We] would hope the US would be cautious of their words and actions regarding Hong Kong affairs and not let Hong Kong issues impede Sino-American relations,” he noted.

 

Read More Here

Enhanced by Zemanta

 South China Morning Post

Investment banker jumps to death from JP Morgan’s headquarters in Central

PUBLISHED : Tuesday, 18 February, 2014, 4:49pm
UPDATED : Wednesday, 19 February, 2014, 9:32am

..
jpmorgan_man.jpg

The man stands on the roof of Chater House in Central as police try to talk him down. Photo: SCMP Pictures

An investment banker at JP Morgan jumped to his death from the roof of the bank’s headquarters in Central yesterday.

Witnesses said the man went to the roof of the 30-storey Chater House in the heart of Hong Kong’s central business district and, despite attempts to talk him down, jumped to his death.

Out of respect for those involved, we cannot yet comment further. Our thoughts and sympathy are with the family that’s involved at this difficult time
JP Morgan spokesman

Shocked witness said the 33-year-old – believed to be a junior-level employee at the bank – climbed onto the roof shortly after lunchtime.

Police said a man was found in a dangerous position on the roof of Chater House on Connaught Road Central at about 2pm. He threw himself off the building before emergency crews arrived.

He landed on the four-lane westbound carriageway outside the building. A police spokeswoman said the man was taken to Ruttonjee Hospital in Wan Chai, where he was declared dead at 2.31pm.

According to several JP Morgan employees, the man worked for the firm’s investment-banking business in Hong Kong.

Police warn pedestrians near Chater House in Central. Photo: SCMP Pictures

An initial police investigation showed he had recently told a colleague he was under heavy work-related stress, according to a police source involved in the investigation. The police said no suicide note was found.

 

Read More Here

…..

Intellihub News

8th international banker to die in a month jumps off building in China

8th international banker to die in a month jumps off building in China

A man who jumped from the JP Morgan building in Hong Kong this week becomes the 8th banker to die mysteriously this month

By John Vibes

HONG KONG (INTELLIHUB) — All month we have been reporting on the suspicious string of apparent suicides that have hit the financial industry.  Multiple bankers have been found dead in recent weeks, all of them have been ruled suicides despite the fact that little information has been released in some of the cases.

Those who had high profile deaths, like the man who jumped from the top of the JP Morgan HQ building in Europe are highly publicized, but overall, very few details about any of these deaths have been made public.  Now this week, another investment banker has jumped from a different JP Morgan HQ, on a different continent, this time in Hong Kong, China.

The fact that many of these deaths seem to be tied to JP Morgan is arousing further suspicion that there is more to this story than meets the eye.

String of suspicious deaths:

1 – William Broeksmit, 58-year-old former senior executive at Deutsche Bank AG, was found dead in his home after an apparent suicide in South Kensington in central London, on January 26th.

2- Karl Slym, 51 year old Tata Motors managing director Karl Slym, was found dead on the fourth floor of the Shangri-La hotel in Bangkok on January 27th.

3 – Gabriel Magee, a 39-year-old JP Morgan employee, died after falling from the roof of the JP Morgan European headquarters in London on January 27th.

Read More Here

…..

New Clues In Suicide Of JP Morgan Banker Add To Mystery

jpmorgan_man

(Paul Joseph Watson) Friends of the JP Morgan banker who leapt to his death from a high rise building in Hong Kong this week, becoming the 7th financial worker to die under strange circumstances in recent weeks, suggest that he was planning to return to Canada, adding to the mystery of the suicide.

33-year-old Dennis Li Junjie plunged to his death on Tuesday after jumping from the roof of Chater House, which serves as JP Morgan’s Asia headquarters. Junjie worked for JP Morgan as a back up services associate.

His suicide was blamed on ”the stressful environment of investment banking,” although its timing, just three weeks after JP Morgan senior manager Gabriel Magee jumped 500ft from the top of the bank’s headquarters in central London, and amidst a number of other strange banker deaths, has prompted speculation that something more insidious may be afoot.

Just two days before his suicide, Junjie told a friend that he planned to return to Toronto, where he had worked as an analyst at the Royal Bank of Canada.

“RIP … What happened to all the promises and plans you made? What happened to your return to Toronto? I didn’t know you were that upset! I will miss you always,” remarked the friend.

Junjie had recently bought a HK$5.5 million apartment in Hong Kong and friends commented on how he always had a smile on his face.

 

Read More Here

 

…..

Enhanced by Zemanta

Earth Watch Report  -  Biological Hazards

H7N9

Johns Hopkins Medicine

…..

Biological Hazard China Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, Hong Kong Damage level Details

…..

Situation Update No. 12Posted:2013-12-03, 04:31:30 [UTC]

Ref.no.:BH-20131203-41836-CHN

Situation Update No. 12On 2014-01-15 at 04:14:21 [UTC]

Event: Biological Hazard

Location: Hong Kong Hong Kong Special Administrative Region China
Number of Dead: 2 person(s)

Number of Injured: 0 person(s)

Number of Evacuated: 0 person(s)

Number of Infected: 4 person(s)

Situation: Hong Kong’s Centre for Health Protection verified a human case of avian influenza A H7N9 on Thursday with China’s National Health and Family Planning Commission in a woman in Zhejiang. The 51-year-old patient’s case of avian flu was confirmed on Wednesday. She is receiving medical treatment in a Hangzhou hospital and was in serious condition as of Thursday. The CHP said it would follow up with Chinese health authorities to gain additional details. “Locally, enhanced disease surveillance, port health measures and health education against avian influenza are ongoing,” a spokesperson with Hong Kong’s Department of Health said. “We will remain vigilant and maintain liaison with the World Health Organization and relevant health authorities. Local surveillance activities will be modified upon the WHO’s recommendations.” To date, there were 152 confirmed human cases of avian influenza A H7N9 in China, including 53 cases in Zhejiang. Thirty-four cases occurred in
Shanghai, 29 in Jiangsu, 10 in Guangdong, six in Jiangxi, five in Fujian, four in Anhui, four in Henan, two in Beijing, two in Hunan, two in Shandong and one in Hebei. The DH in Hong Kong said it is taking precautions to ensure cases do not occur locally. “All boarder control points have implemented disease prevention and control measures,” the DH spokesperson said. “Thermal imaging systems are in place for body temperature checks of inbound travelers. Random temperature checks by handheld devices will also be arranged. Suspected cases will be immediately referred to public hospitals for follow-up investigation.”

…..

Hong Kong confirms case of avian flu in China

H7N9 Virus

H7N9 Virus

Hong Kong’s Centre for Health Protection verified a human case of avian influenza A H7N9 on Thursday with China’s National Health and Family Planning Commission in a woman in Zhejiang.

The 51-year-old patient’s case of avian flu was confirmed on Wednesday. She is receiving medical treatment in a Hangzhou hospital and was in serious condition as of Thursday. The CHP said it would follow up with Chinese health authorities to gain additional details.

“Locally, enhanced disease surveillance, port health measures and health education against avian influenza are ongoing,” a spokesperson with Hong Kong’s Department of Health said. “We will remain vigilant and maintain liaison with the World Health Organization and relevant health authorities. Local surveillance activities will be modified upon the WHO’s recommendations.

Read More Here

…..

Enhanced by Zemanta
EPIDEMICS


by Staff Writers
Hong Kong (AFP) Dec 26, 2013

A Hong Kong man infected with the H7N9 strain of bird flu died on Thursday, the first such death in the city since the virus emerged there this month.

The 80-year-old man was the second reported case of H7N9 infection in Hong Kong after one reported on December 2.

A government spokesman confirmed the death of the man, who had been suffering from other underlying medical conditions.

He had been taken to hospital after returning to Hong Kong from the neighbouring city of Shenzhen in mainland China, where he lives.

Hong Kong officials have stepped up border checks and traced hundreds who had been in contact with the two people infected.

Read More Here

…..

Man dies from H7N9 in Hong Kong

H7N9

H7N9

A Hong Kong man infected with the H7N9 strain of bird flu died on Thursday, the first such death in the city since the virus emerged there this month. The 80-year-old man was the second reported case of H7N9 infection in Hong Kong after one reported on December 2.

A government spokesman confirmed the death of the man, who had been suffering from other underlying medical conditions.

He had been taken to hospital after returning to Hong Kong from the neighbouring city of Shenzhen in mainland China, where he lives.

Hong Kong officials have stepped up border checks and traced hundreds who had been in contact with the two people infected.

The first case involved a 36-year-old Indonesian domestic helper who also had a history of travelling to Shenzhen.

Health officials had expected human cases of avian influenza in low winter temperatures, given the number of cases in mainland China.

In all, 138 human cases of H7N9 have been reported in mainland China since February with 45 deaths, according to the World Health Organisation.

Hong Kong is especially alert to the spread of viruses after an outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome swept through the city in 2003, killing 299 people and infecting around 1,800.

Voice of Russia, AFP

…..

Enhanced by Zemanta

Chinese health authorities today reported two more novel H7N9 infections from different parts of the country, including in a 3-year-old boy with mild illness who is hospitalized, according to media reports and an early notification from the World Health Organization (WHO).

The cases are the third and fourth to be reported since the middle of October and would boost China’s number of H7N9 infections to 139, which includes 45 deaths.

First case in Guangdong

The boy is hospitalized in Dongguan City in southern China’s Guangdong province, where he is in stable condition, Xinhua, China’s state news agency reported today. His infection was detected during routine hospital monitoring of flulike cases.

Donnguan is a large industrial city that borders Guangzhou, the provincial capital. The youngster’s illness is Guangdong’s second H7N9 case. The province’s first case was reported in early August, months after the virus was detected in poultry markets there.

Hong Kong’s Centre for Health Protection (CHP) said in a statement that the boy doesn’t have a fever and his flu-like symptoms are minor. All seven of the boy’s close contacts who were under close observation tested negative for the virus, though three had flu-like symptoms.

Second case in Zhejiang

Very few details were available about the second case-patient, who is from Zhejiang province. The first news of the detection came from WHO Twitter posts, which said China had notified it of two new lab-confirmed H7N9 cases in Guangdong and Zhejiang.

Gregory Hartl, a WHO spokesman, said in separate Twitter posts that the two H7N9 cases were reported from different parts of China on the same day. “Winter is starting,” he said.

In October Zhejiang province, located roughly 800 miles northeast of Guangdong, reported two H7N9 cases, in a 35-year-old man who was hospitalized in critical condition and in a 67-year-old farmer who had contact with live poultry and was also listed in critical condition.

Zhejiang is the Chinese province with the most H7N9 cases, with 49 infections and 11 deaths reported so far.

Wave of infections coming?

When the H7N9 virus was first detected China in March, the number of cases soared, then dropped sharply in May, with only two additional cases reported over the summer. Global health officials said poultry-market closures probably played a role in the declining number of cases, and there was a chance that the virus could burn itself out.

They said, however, that they expected sporadic cases to continue. And they warned that although flu viruses are unpredictable, there was a chance that the number of cases could start rising again as the Northern Hemisphere’s weather cools, a pattern seen with other avian influenza viruses such as H5N1.

 

Read More Here

Enhanced by Zemanta

Earth Watch Report -  Earthquakes

 
Taiwan  -  6.3mag EQ  October  31st  2013 photo Taiwan-63MagEQOctober31st2013_zpsc254a131.jpg
  3 earthquakes in map area

  1. M 4.7 – 42km SSW of Hualian, Taiwan

    2013-10-31 10:47:28 UTC-05:00 4.4 km

  2. M 6.3 – 45km SSW of Hualian, Taiwan

    2013-10-31 07:02:09 UTC-05:00 12.0 km

  3. M 4.5 – 18km SSE of Hualian, Taiwan

    2013-10-27 03:27:13 UTC-05:00 47.1 km

……….

M 6.3 – 45km SSW of Hualian, Taiwan

2013-10-31 12:02:09 UTC

Earthquake location 23.591°N, 121.443°E

Event Time

  1. 2013-10-31 12:02:09 UTC
  2. 2013-10-31 20:02:09 UTC+08:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-10-31 07:02:09 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

23.591°N 121.443°E depth=12.0km (7.5mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 45km (28mi) SSW of Hualian, Taiwan
  2. 63km (39mi) SE of Buli, Taiwan
  3. 72km (45mi) ESE of Lugu, Taiwan
  4. 87km (54mi) ESE of Nantou, Taiwan
  5. 761km (473mi) ENE of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

…..

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

…..
Taiwan  -  6.3 Mag EQ  October 31st  2013 photo Taiwan-63MagEQOctober31st2013_zps1ab19726.jpg
…..

Tectonic Summary

The October 31, 2013 M 6.3 earthquake southwest of Hualian, Taiwan occurred as the result of shallow oblique-thrust faulting near the central-east coast of the island of Taiwan and the boundary between the Philippine Sea and Eurasia plates. East of the October 31 earthquake, plate boundary tectonics are dominated by the westward subduction of the Philippine Sea Plate beneath Eurasia along the Ryukyu Trench, which runs from southwest Japan to Taiwan. Some authors infer that this subduction continues beneath the east coast of Taiwan. South of the island towards the Philippines, the plate boundary reflects arc-continent collision more than traditional subduction. The October 31 earthquake occurred at the transition between these tectonic regimes, and is a consequence of the convergence between these major plates. At the location of this earthquake, the Philippine Sea plate moves to the northwest with respect to Eurasia at a velocity of approximately 77 mm/yr.

This region of Taiwan is familiar with moderate to large earthquake activity, and has hosted over 60 events of M6 or greater within 250 km of the October 31 event in the past 40 years. Seven of these were M7 or greater, including a M7.4 earthquake 40 km to the north of the October 31 event in November 1986, which caused 13 fatalities.

Seismotectonics of the Philippine Sea and Vicinity

The Philippine Sea plate is bordered by the larger Pacific and Eurasia plates and the smaller Sunda plate. The Philippine Sea plate is unusual in that its borders are nearly all zones of plate convergence. The Pacific plate is subducted into the mantle, south of Japan, beneath the Izu-Bonin and Mariana island arcs, which extend more than 3,000 km along the eastern margin of the Philippine Sea plate. This subduction zone is characterized by rapid plate convergence and high-level seismicity extending to depths of over 600 km. In spite of this extensive zone of plate convergence, the plate interface has been associated with few great (M>8.0) ‘megathrust’ earthquakes. This low seismic energy release is thought to result from weak coupling along the plate interface (Scholz and Campos, 1995). These convergent plate margins are also associated with unusual zones of back-arc extension (along with resulting seismic activity) that decouple the volcanic island arcs from the remainder of the Philippine Sea Plate (Karig et al., 1978; Klaus et al., 1992).

South of the Mariana arc, the Pacific plate is subducted beneath the Yap Islands along the Yap trench. The long zone of Pacific plate subduction at the eastern margin of the Philippine Sea Plate is responsible for the generation of the deep Izu-Bonin, Mariana, and Yap trenches as well as parallel chains of islands and volcanoes, typical of circum-pacific island arcs. Similarly, the northwestern margin of the Philippine Sea plate is subducting beneath the Eurasia plate along a convergent zone, extending from southern Honshu to the northeastern coast of Taiwan, manifested by the Ryukyu Islands and the Nansei-Shoto (Ryukyu) trench. The Ryukyu Subduction Zone is associated with a similar zone of back-arc extension, the Okinawa Trough. At Taiwan, the plate boundary is characterized by a zone of arc-continent collision, whereby the northern end of the Luzon island arc is colliding with the buoyant crust of the Eurasia continental margin offshore China.

Along its western margin, the Philippine Sea plate is associated with a zone of oblique convergence with the Sunda Plate. This highly active convergent plate boundary extends along both sides the Philippine Islands, from Luzon in the north to the Celebes Islands in the south. The tectonic setting of the Philippines is unusual in several respects: it is characterized by opposite-facing subduction systems on its east and west sides; the archipelago is cut by a major transform fault, the Philippine Fault; and the arc complex itself is marked by active volcanism, faulting, and high seismic activity. Subduction of the Philippine Sea Plate occurs at the eastern margin of the archipelago along the Philippine Trench and its northern extension, the East Luzon Trough. The East Luzon Trough is thought to be an unusual example of a subduction zone in the process of formation, as the Philippine Trench system gradually extends northward (Hamburger et al., 1983). On the west side of Luzon, the Sunda Plate subducts eastward along a series of trenches, including the Manila Trench in the north, the smaller less well-developed Negros Trench in the central Philippines, and the Sulu and Cotabato trenches in the south (Cardwell et al., 1980). At its northern and southern terminations, subduction at the Manila Trench is interrupted by arc-continent collision, between the northern Philippine arc and the Eurasian continental margin at Taiwan and between the Sulu-Borneo Block and Luzon at the island of Mindoro. The Philippine fault, which extends over 1,200 km within the Philippine arc, is seismically active. The fault has been associated with major historical earthquakes, including the destructive M7.6 Luzon earthquake of 1990 (Yoshida and Abe, 1992). A number of other active intra-arc fault systems are associated with high seismic activity, including the Cotabato Fault and the Verde Passage-Sibuyan Sea Fault (Galgana et al., 2007).

Relative plate motion vectors near the Philippines (about 80 mm/yr) is oblique to the plate boundary along the two plate margins of central Luzon, where it is partitioned into orthogonal plate convergence along the trenches and nearly pure translational motion along the Philippine Fault (Barrier et al., 1991). Profiles B and C reveal evidence of opposing inclined seismic zones at intermediate depths (roughly 70-300 km) and complex tectonics at the surface along the Philippine Fault.

Several relevant tectonic elements, plate boundaries and active volcanoes, provide a context for the seismicity presented on the main map. The plate boundaries are most accurate along the axis of the trenches and more diffuse or speculative in the South China Sea and Lesser Sunda Islands. The active volcanic arcs (Siebert and Simkin, 2002) follow the Izu, Volcano, Mariana, and Ryukyu island chains and the main Philippine islands parallel to the Manila, Negros, Cotabato, and Philippine trenches.

Seismic activity along the boundaries of the Philippine Sea Plate (Allen et al., 2009) has produced 7 great (M>8.0) earthquakes and 250 large (M>7) events. Among the most destructive events were the 1923 Kanto, the 1948 Fukui and the 1995 Kobe (Japan) earthquakes (99,000, 5,100, and 6,400 casualties, respectively), the 1935 and the 1999 Chi-Chi (Taiwan) earthquakes (3,300 and 2,500 casualties, respectively), and the 1976 M7.6 Moro Gulf and 1990 M7.6 Luzon (Philippines) earthquakes (7,100 and 2,400 casualties, respectively). There have also been a number of tsunami-generating events in the region, including the Moro Gulf earthquake, whose tsunami resulted in more than 5000 deaths.

More information on regional seismicity and tectonics

…..

6.6 quake hits Taiwan; no tsunami warning to US coast

6.6 quake hits Taiwan; no tsunami warning to US coast
 

by Associated Press

Posted on October 31, 2013 at 6:06 AM

 

TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — A strong earthquake hit eastern Taiwan on Thursday, shaking buildings over a wide area including the capital. There were no immediate reports of serious damage or casualties.

The U.S. Geological Survey said the earthquake measured magnitude 6.6 and struck in the evening. It was centered in a remote mountainous area 45 kilometers (28 miles) south-southwest of the coastal city of Hualian at a depth of just 9.3 kilometers (5.8 miles), it said.

In Taipei, the capital, buildings swayed for more than 10 seconds and startled residents ducked for cover.

Read More Here

…..

Enhanced by Zemanta

Published time: September 23, 2013 02:27
Edited time: September 23, 2013 03:27
 

People watch waves hit the shores as Typhoon Usagi approaches in Shantou, Guangdong province, September 22, 2013 (Reuters)

People watch waves hit the shores as Typhoon Usagi approaches in Shantou, Guangdong province, September 22, 2013 (Reuters)

At least 25 people were killed as the year’s most powerful typhoon crashed into Hong Kong and southern China on Sunday evening, canceling hundreds of flights, crippling power lines, and causing significant flooding.

The harshest storm to reach the Western Pacific this year, Typhoon Usagi hit Hong Kong on Sunday, canceling more than 370 flights and shutting down one of the world’s busiest sea ports.

A No. 8 signal warning, the third highest on a five-point scale, remained on Monday morning, forcing financial markets to stay closed for the first part of the day. Authorities said they might lower the warning signal before 10:00 am local time (01:00 GMT).

A total of 25 people were killed, national television broadcaster CCTV reported. Thirteen of them were from Shanwei, located on the eastern fringes of Guangdong province. The victims died from drowning or being hit by debris.

More than 80,000 people have been evacuated to safety in the Fujian province and 50,000 disaster-relief staff are being sent to help, according to Xinhua news agency.

A man walks under fallen branches on a pavement at a residential district after Typhoon Usagi hit Hong Kong September 23, 2013 (Reuters / Bobby Yip)

A man walks under fallen branches on a pavement at a residential district after Typhoon Usagi hit Hong Kong September 23, 2013 (Reuters / Bobby Yip)

Usagi – Japanese for ‘rabbit’ – was classified as a severe typhoon, which carried winds of up to 180 kilometers per hour (110 miles per hour), with gusts of up to 213 kph (132 mph) in some areas of southern China. The typhoon tossed around trees, cranes, and cars.

Read More Here

**************************************************************

Typhoon Usagi smashes into southern China

Published time: September 21, 2013 12:16
Edited time: September 23, 2013 03:40
 

A big wave smashes into a breakwater as Typhoon Usagi approaches the eastern coastal town of Taitung September 21, 2013. (Reuters)

A big wave smashes into a breakwater as Typhoon Usagi approaches the eastern coastal town of Taitung September 21, 2013. (Reuters)

The year’s most powerful typhoon crashed into southern China on Sunday evening, killing two people and forcing hundreds of flight cancellations in nearby Hong Kong as heavy rain and fierce winds were brought to the region.

The typhoon was earlier on a crash course with Hong Kong, but veered away at the last minute, making landfall near the city of Shanwei in the Chinese province of Guangdong.

Two people in Guangdong province died after they were hit by a fallen tree, Xinhua news agency reported, citing local  officials.

Authorities in Guangdong initiated an emergency response plan for the Daya Bay nuclear power station – located northeast of Hong Kong – as Usagi approached, ordering four of six reactors to operate at a reduced load, the agency said.

Police in Shanwei ordered more than 8,000 fishing boats to return to port and more than 1,200 residents were shuttled to temporary shelters.

Usagi – Japanese for ‘rabbit’ – was classified as a severe typhoon, packing sustained winds of 175 kilometers (109 miles) per hour, with gusts of up to 213 kph (132 mph). The typhoon shut down one of the world’s busiest sea ports and severely disrupted flight schedules from the US and Europe.

Hong Kong International Airport said that 370 arriving and departing flights were canceled and another 64 delayed, AP reported. Ferry services between Hong Kong and nearby Macau and outlying islands were suspended as the observatory raised the No. 8 storm warning signal – the third highest on a five-point scale.

The storm, characterized by meteorologists as the most powerful anywhere on Earth this year, earlier killed two people in the Philippines and sparked landslides in Taiwan while en route to southern China. Nine people in Taiwan were reportedly injured by falling trees.

Usagi was downgraded from a super typhoon on Saturday as its sustained winds fell below 241 kilometers (150 miles) per hour as it passed through the the Luzon Strait, which separates the Philippines and Taiwan.

In response to the imminent threat, Hong Kong authorities warned citizens to brace themselves for flooding and powerful winds. Cathay Pacific airline has announced it will suspend services when the storm strikes.

A fisherman secures his boat at a shelter in preparation for Typhoon Usagi in Hong Kong on September 21, 2013. (AFP Photo / Laurent Fievet)

A fisherman secures his boat at a shelter in preparation for Typhoon Usagi in Hong Kong on September 21, 2013. (AFP Photo / Laurent Fievet)

“Due to the anticipated impact of Super Typhoon Usagi approaching, operations at Hong Kong will stop from 18:00 on 22 September (Sunday) through 23 September (Monday),” said a statement on the company’s website. The statement also urged citizens to refrain from non-essential travel.

On mainland China, authorities issued a red alert – the highest level warning – and forecast hurricane force winds and heavy rains. Over 4,000 people inhabiting the coastal towns of Fujian Province were evacuated in preparation for Usagi’s arrival. Around 23,000 fishing boats have been put into shelter.

A three-wheeled vehicle lies on its side after being blown over by winds from Typhoon Usagi in the town of Hengtsun in southeast Pingtung county on September 21, 2013 as the storm sweeps past the southern parts of the island. (AFP Photo / Sam Yeh)

A three-wheeled vehicle lies on its side after being blown over by winds from Typhoon Usagi in the town of Hengtsun in southeast Pingtung county on September 21, 2013 as the storm sweeps past the southern parts of the island. (AFP Photo / Sam Yeh)

Usagi has already swept through the Philippines and Taiwan, leaving a trail of destruction in its wake.
The typhoon hit the Batanes islands in the early hours of Saturday morning, knocking down trees and cutting electricity.

Read More Here

**************************************************************

Enhanced by Zemanta

Hong Kong braced for ‘strongest storm on earth’ as 180mph monster Super-Typhoon Usagi gains strength over the Pacific

The storm is set to roar between the Philippines and Taiwan before hammering the southern Chinese coast

A monster Super Typhoon has intensified explosively in the last 24 hours and remains on track to wreak havoc in Taiwan, the Philippines and potentially Hong Kong over the weekend.

Over the last day Super Typhoon Usagi, which is now the strongest storm to form on earth this year, has seen winds increase from 75mph on Tuesday to over 160 mph today. The cyclone is now classified now as a Super Typhoon and is considered the equivalent of a category 5 hurricane.

The storm, which is expected to maintain its current strength for at least the next 24 hours, is on course to dump 1000mm of rain (three times the annual London rainfall) on Taiwan over the next three days. The storm is set to roar between the Philippines and Taiwan before hammering the southern Chinese coast, and possibly Hong Kong, later in the weekend.

Experts have said that due to the lack of ‘hurricane hunter’ aircraft in the Pacific they can’t accurately measure how strong the storm is, and that it may be even stronger.

According to Quartz one satellite-based estimate ranks the storm as the most powerful on the planet since 1984, having a minimum central pressure of 882 millibars.

Typhoon Usagi will first batter coastal Taiwan bringing with it damaging winds, a significant storm surge and heavy and persistent rain, before heading towards Hong Kong.

Peak winds are at that time predicted to have weakened to around 100mph.

Read More Here

******************************************************************************

Philippines evacuates coastal villages ahead of typhoon Usagi

Strongest storm to hit western Pacific this year set to strike Philippines and Taiwan on way to Hong Kong and China

Philippines storm

Workers remove tourist boats in the south-east Philippines as typhoon Usagi approaches. Photograph: Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images

The Philippines has evacuated northern coastal villages, suspended ferry services and called in fishing boats as an approaching category 5 storm, already labelled a super-typhoon, gained strength on a path set for southern China.

With winds of 127 mph, typhoon Usagi, the strongest storm to hit the western Pacific this year, was moving north-west between the Philippines and Taiwan and headed for Hong Kong and south China.

China’s Xinhua news agency said preparations were being made for an “emergency response” in southern coastal areas.

Storm alerts have been raised on the rice and coconut-growing island of Batanes and 15 provinces on the main Philippines island of Luzon, the weather bureau said.

“Our people there know the drill, but we have also issued warnings to take safety precautions,” the budget secretary, Florencio Abad, said. “We’re praying it doesn’t create death and destruction.”

A typhoon hit Batanes in 1987, destroying all roads as the water level surged as high as seven metres. “All our coconut trees broke in half,” Abad said.

Power and communications in the area have been cut off for safety reasons and hospitals were put on alert as disaster agencies stocked up on food and water. Troops were also put on standby.

Read More Here

******************************************************************************

Monstrous super typhoon Usagi holding its own, Hong Kong braces for possible impact

This image was taken by the Japan Meteorological Agency's MTSAT-2 satellite at 0730Z on September 20, 2013. (NOAA)
This image was taken by the Japan Meteorological Agency’s MTSAT-2 satellite at 0730Z on September 20, 2013. (NOAA)

Super typhoon Usagi, 2013′s strongest storm on the planet, may have peaked in intensity, but remains an extremely dangerous cyclone as it continues on a collision course with southern Taiwan and, likely, Hong Kong.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center says Osagi’s maximum sustained winds are 150 mph, the equivalent of a category 4 hurricane.  That’s down from at least 160 mph Thursday (category 5 level). But this is a mammoth storm, tropical storm force winds span 275 miles across it.

On Thursday evening, a satellite-based estimate of its minimum pressure was an astonishingly low 882 mb, which would have made it the deepest and most intense storm to exist on Earth since 1984 (tied with hurricane Wilma in 2005).

Look at this incredible high resolution satellite image of the storm from Thursday afternoon, revealing the textbook traits of a flawless cyclone:

(Colorado State University)

Usagi infrared satellite view 12:33 p.m. ET Thursday (Colorado State University)

You see the cloud-free, distinct eye which is surrounded by tall thunderstorms on all sides.

Due to a re-arrangement of its internal structure since that time, known as an eye-wall replacement cycle, Usagi has lost some steam and its satellite presentation – while impressive – is less than perfect.

(NOAA)

Usagi infrared satellite view 1:14 p.m. ET Friday (NOAA)

Its eye is somewhat ragged, and deep convection (a fancy term for thunderstorms) is less pronounced in its northeast quadrant.

What’s next for Usagi?

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center predicts additional weakening as Usagi’s circulation is disrupted by Taiwan. Usagi will batter Taiwan’s south and east coast with damaging winds, torrential range, massive waves, and a dangerous storm surge today into Saturday. The storm’s rain bands have already begun to lash coastal areas.

Link: Animated Taiwan radar loop

Usagi is then expected to cross the South China Sea, but further weakening is forecast.

“THE SYSTEM IS UNLIKELY TO RE-INTENSIFY OVER THE SOUTH CHINA SEA DUE TO LAND INTERACTION AND DECREASING OCEAN HEAT CONTENT,” says the Joint Typhoon Warning Center.

Read More Here

******************************************************************************

Enhanced by Zemanta

Wildlife Extra

More than 2 tonnes of ivory seized in Hong Kong

world/Asia/2013/Hong-Kong-ivory-July-2013The ivory tusks were packed in 30 sacks and covered by wooden boards in the innermost part of the container. © Hong Kong Customs and Excise Department

Seizure of 1,148 ivory tusks underscores Hong Kong’s transit role in illicit trade
July 2013-Hong Kong Customs have seized 1,148 ivory tusks weighing 2.183 tonnes. The tusks were declared as timber and concealed in a 20 foot (6 m) container that arrived on a vessel from the West African country of Togo.
Repeated large scale seizures
It was the ninth large-scale ivory seizure made in Hong Kong since 2010, with a combined weight of just over 14 tonnes. CITES has defined large-scale seizures as 500 kg or more, and typically are indicative of organized criminal activity.

Hong Kong, Malaysia, the Philippines and Viet Nam
Hong Kong, together with Malaysia, the Philippines and Viet Nam, were identified through analysis of the Elephant Trade Information System (ETIS) database as the main transit points for ivory arriving in Asia from Africa before onward distribution to the major markets in Thailand and China. Collectively, they have made or been implicated in 21 (62%) of the 34 large-scale ivory seizures made between 2009 and 2011, totalling 41.1 tonnes of ivory.

ETIS is the world’s foremost collection of ivory and other elephant product seizures containing nearly 20,000 records from some 90 countries or territories worldwide since 1989. It is managed by TRAFFIC on behalf of Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), who met this March in Bangkok, Thailand.

Read More Here

Enhanced by Zemanta
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,506 other followers