Tag Archive: Garden


LearnHowToGarden LearnHowToGarden

Published on Apr 5, 2013

http://learn-how-to-garden.com

Thought I would share with you how to make a no dig potato bed. This type of bed is easily constructed and can save you so much time and effort as well as producing a brilliant crop.

Mark Abbott-Compton

Ten Minute Gardener

Enhanced by Zemanta
About these ads

MOTHER EARTH NEWS

Manage these vigorous self-seeders so you’ll never have to buy seeds again.

By Barbara Pleasant
August/September 2010

self-seeding crops
Letting crops flower and go to seed also supports beneficial insects!
ILLUSTRATION: ELAYNE SEARS

One of the characteristics of a truly sustainable garden is that it produces at least some of its own seed. This is most often done when gardeners select, harvest and store seeds until the proper time for planting the following year. But some self-seeding crops produce seeds so readily that as long as you give them time to flower and mature, and set seed, you will always have free plants growing in your garden. You can simply let the seeds fall where they are, or toss pieces of the seed heads into the corners of your garden, or whichever area you want them in — no harvesting, storing or replanting required. With most self-seeding vegetables, herbs and annual flowers, you’ll just need to learn to recognize the seedlings so you don’t hoe them down. Should seedlings require relocation, you can simply lift and move them — after all, they are sturdy field-grown seedlings.

In addition to getting all the free garden plants you need (and some to share with family and friends), nurturing self-seeders is also a great way to provide a diversity of flowers that supply pollen and nectar for beneficial insects. Self-seeding flowers, herbs and vegetables that show up in early spring include arugula, calendula, chamomile, cilantro, dill, breadseed poppies and brilliant red orach (mountain spinach). Nasturtiums, amaranth, New Zealand spinach, and even basil or zinnias appear later, after the soil has warmed.

Starting a new colony of any of these annuals is usually a simple matter of lopping off armloads of brittle, seedbearing stems in the fall, and dumping them where you want the plants to appear the next season. It’s that easy. Most of the seedlings will appear in the first year after you let seed-bearing plants drop their seeds, with lower numbers popping up in subsequent seasons.

Working with reseeding, or self-sowing, crops saves time and trouble and often gives excellent results, but a few special techniques and precautions are in order. Some plants that self-sow too freely — especially perennials such as garlic chives or horseradish — will cross the line into weediness if not handled with care.

Spring Seeds for Fall Crops

The first group of plants to try as self-sown crops — both because they’re the easiest and they’ll be ready the same year — are those that tend to bolt in late spring. If allowed to bloom and set seed, dill, radishes, arugula, cilantro, broccoli raab, turnips and any kind of mustard will produce ripe seeds in time for fall reseeding in most climates. Lettuce will take a little longer, but often gives good results in Zone 5 or warmer.

One way to encourage self-seeders is to select vigorous plants from a larger planting, and let these plants grow unharvested until they bloom and produce seeds. This will work well enough, but it’s often bothersome to have one lone turnip holding up the renovation of a planting bed. To get around this problem, use a Noah’s ark approach: Set aside a bed or row and transplant pairs of plants being grown for seed into the ark bed. As the weeks pass, weed, water and stake up seed-bearing branches to keep them clean, but don’t pick from the “seed ark” bed.

Read More  Here

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

growingyourgreens

Published on Jul 26, 2013

John from http://www.growingyourgreens.com/ shares with you his 10 reasons why he has been successful gardening in 117 degree dry, desert heat, when others have not. This episode will be of value if you live in the desert or not as these tips can be applied for every gardener no matter where you live. After watching this episode you will know 10 proven methods to improve your organic vegetable garden whether you live in the desert or anywhere else.

Enhanced by Zemanta

You can grow bigger, better cukes, beans, tomatoes and cantaloupes with simple, sturdy trellises

By Barbara Pleasant
December 2010/January 2011

 

 

Vertical Gardening Supports
Clockwise from top left: Rigid livestock panels do double duty as a fence and support for tomatoes, plus they can be bent to create an arched entry; saplings or bamboo poles are easy to use for pole bean tipis; pea tendrils love to cling to twiggy brush; and so-called “tomato” cages work better to support peppers and eggplants.

ILLUSTRATION: ELAYNE SEARS

Whether your garden is large or small, you can make better use of every square inch by using vertical gardening techniques to grow upright crops. Pole beans typically produce twice as many beans as bush varieties, and the right trellis can double cucumber yields. Then there are crops, such as tomatoes, that need some type of support to keep them above damp ground, where diseases have a heyday. All properly supported plants are easier to pick from and monitor for pests, plus you’ll get help from bug-eating birds that use trellises as hunting perches.

How Plants Climb

Plants that benefit from garden trellises use a variety of methods to cling to support, including curling tendrils, twining stems or, in the case of tomatoes, long, ropy branches that form roots in places that touch the ground.

Curling tendrils produced by peas and cucumber-family crops will twist around whatever is available, so you have plenty of versatility when supporting these crops. Tendrils cling to horizontal and vertical parts of a trellis, so netting woven from biodegradable string attached to posts often works well. Twining stems spiral around their support, growing steadily upward until they turn back on themselves — a growth habit seen in hops, pole beans, Malabar spinach and yard long beans.

Twining stems have little use for horizontal lines, so they do best with trellises composed mostly of poles or an upright fence. (See illustration in the Image Gallery.)

Tomatoes like to throw themselves over their support. They must be trained and tied to an upright trellis, which isn’t as easy as growing them in wire cages. The larger, more robust the tomato plant, the more you need a sturdy tomato cage that provides support on all sides.

Temporary or Permanent?

In my experience, a truly sturdy upright garden trellis must be anchored by T-stakes or vertical 4-by-4 posts (or 3-inch-diameter saplings from the woods), sunk 18 inches deep. Installing this semi-permanent garden structure takes time and muscle. In my garden, the most versatile trellises are about 8 feet wide, stand 4 to 5 feet high, and are made of woven wire fencing or a livestock panel attached to two posts. Allowing 4 inches of clearance between the bottom of the fencing and the ground makes the area easier to weed and cultivate. The advantages of such a trellis are the ready availability of the structure each spring and the option to make an attractive permanent feature in the garden.

The drawback of this or any other long-lasting vertical gardening supports (like an existing fence) is that it limits rotations to peas, beans, tomatoes and cucumber-family crops. Temporary trellises, such as bamboo tipis, give you more flexibility in terms of what you plant where, but they need to be taken down and stored in a dry place through winter to keep them from rotting. If you gather trellis parts and bind them together with string or strips of cloth in the fall and store them over the winter, they will go up quickly the following season.

 

Read More  Here

Enhanced by Zemanta

Campbell Ferrara Campbell Ferrara

Uploaded on May 31, 2011

Campbell & Ferrara plant expert Dodi Turney will help you learn how to choose and combine the best plants for your container garden. Planted containers create an instant garden and are the ultimate fashion statement in modern urban gardening.

*****************************************************************************************************

Patio Vegetable Gardening

VirginiaFarmBureau VirginiaFarmBureau

Uploaded on Jan 6, 2011

Everyone can have a vegetable garden in the summer, even folks with just a few feet of patio space. Mark Viette explains how.

***************************************************************************************************

Balcony Gardening

VeggieVillage VeggieVillage

Uploaded on Jan 31, 2010

Yukari demonstrates how to make a balcony garden using permacultuure principals.

growingyourgreens

Published on Apr 27, 2013

John http://www.growingyourgreens.com/ gives you a tour of his front yard garden and talks about weedy vegetables or plants that will re-seed themselves in your garden so you don’t have to replant them. In this episode John will share with you about a dozen crops that have dropped seed and come up on their own in his garden. By growing weedy vegetables it will reduce the amount of work so you can be eating more out of your organic garden and less out of the grocery store.

Richters Herbs Richters Herbs

Published on Feb 25, 2013

Permaculture is a system of ecological design that strives to emulate natural ecosystems so that our gardens and farms become self-sustaining, healthy and bountiful. It seeks to create gardens and landscapes that arrange all the elements of the design in ways that maximize the synergy of the design while minimizing the need for human inputs such as labour, fertilizer and pesticides. Trees and idea of forest gardening play a big part. Increasingly the principles of permaculture are being adapted for homes, even in the cities and suburbs. Travis Philp, a trained environmental and eco management technician, is a resident of the Greenshire Eco Farm where he manages the permaculture garden beds and looks after crop planting, maintenance, harvest and the weekly filling of food boxes. He will show you how to incorporate the principles of permaculture around your home or farm.
(Hugelkultur images courtesy Paul Wheaton, http://richsoil.com/hugelkultur.)

 

Myk Rushton

Uploaded on May 7, 2011

This is the full video of the no dig garden construction workshop from 2009 that the previous quick video was made from. The video features Bob Jones and Myk Rushton

You do not have to follow the video specifically, you can use different materials – just follow the general pattern of construction

Visit the New Zealand no dig garden website http://www.no-dig-gardening.org or the http://www.permaculture.org.nz if you wish to further discuss this or other techniques for a resilient future

Monday, April 8, 2013

Want to Build a Guerrilla Garden? This Crowdsourcing Platform Could Help

Wendy Moore

Activist Post

So you know of an open lot in your neighborhood that would be perfect for a community garden. You really, really want to build one, but you don’t quite know how to pull it off. Let’s be honest—the idea of pulling off a garden build can be pretty daunting. You need a lot of supplies, possibly some funds, and, ideally a bunch of people to help—unless you feel like devoting the next couple weekends to digging.

You’ve heard of barn raising, right? That old tradition of collective community action in which the whole community used to gather together to build a barn for their neighbor. At thrdPlace, a newly-launched local platform for social action, we’re bringing it back by tapping online community to drive on the ground action.

So, think barn raising and replace it with… community gardens, mural creation, or art pop-ups. We help get the word out and recruit people to get involved by sharing the story of your project through the social networks of each person who comes to your project page and clicks to support your project.

What does this look like in real time? This past weekend we helped the Social Justice Learning Institute, a local Los Angeles nonprofit “dedicated to improving the education, health, and well being of youth and communities of color by empowering them to enact social change through research, training, and community mobilization,” to organize and execute 10 backyard gardens at South L.A. homes as part of their 10 Homes–10 Seeds initiative.

 

Read Full Article Here

Heather Callaghan
Activist Post

The Helvenstons have not backed down from their front-yard garden battle initiated by Orlando, Florida. It started when the city demanded they uproot their edible 25 x 25 micro-garden neatly located in front of their home on a dead-end neighborhood road away from city view. But deadlines passed and they kept right on growing.

Click HERE to see video report

The city took note of the protest at City Hall with supporters of Jason and Jennifer. However, they want a compromise – and that’s where we really need to pay attention. Of course, in true bureaucratic fashion, they came up with a complicated list that actually contains many more restrictions, including heights, lengths, reduced portions of front-yard gardens, and, additionally – new restrictions on side and backyard growth.

“Our goal is to help them create a sustainable city, the greenest city in America,” said Jason Helvenston. “We’re here to support that. We don’t want to go to court over it.”

Remember I said to watch out for the words (Green Works) Task Force? They wanted to create a task force to “work with them.” In the same vein, watch out for when they finally decide to draft a new ordinance. They won’t stop. When they won’t even back down from worldwide backlash, think Agenda 21! What say you?

And what of bureaucrats’ reasons for going after gardens in the first place? Nameless complaints from neighbors supposedly for their garden being an “eye sore.” How many unprofessional things could we say in response to that? An eye sore complaint – that warrants total uprooting of a garden on privately owned property? What about all the other problems the city ignores – like, I don’t know, hundreds of front-yard-garden protesters?
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,574 other followers