Category: Hemp


Gov. to sign industrial hemp bill

Published  11:26 AM HST Apr 28, 2014
 
Hemp

Wikimedia Commons/kat_geb

HONOLULU —Gov. Neil Abercrombie is scheduled to sign SB2175 into law on Wednesday.  The bill authorizes the University of Hawaii at Manoa to establish a two-year industrial hemp remediation and biofuel research program.

This year, the United States Senate approved the Agriculture Act of 2014, also known as the “Farm Bill,” and industrial hemp is now allowed to be grown for research purposes.  According to the National Farm Bill, any university can now grow industrial hemp without obtaining a Drug Enforcement Agency permit.

 

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Interesting topics Civil Beat includes a hearing by lawmakers for authorizing industrial hemp. Civilbeat.com reporter Chad Blair has more information.

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Governor Signs Bill Authorizing Industrial Hemp Research Program

Rep. Cynthia Thielen stands before a hemp crop in France

REPORT FROM THE OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR – HONOLULU – Gov. Neil Abercrombie today signed Senate Bill 2175 (Act 56), a measure that allows the University of Hawaii (UH) College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources (CTAHR) to establish a two-year industrial hemp remediation and biofuel crop research program.

Act 56 authorizes the growth and cultivation of industrial hemp in accordance with requirements established by the federal Agriculture Act of 2014, which allows higher education institutions and state departments of agriculture to conduct industrial hemp research.

 

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File:La Roche Jagu chanvre 1.JPG

Hemp labryrinth at the Château de la Roche-Jagu.
By  :  Barbetorte
Wikipedia.org
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File:Industrialhemp.jpg

Cultivation of industrial hemp for fiber and for grain in france.
By  :  Aleks
Wikimedia.org
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File:Hemp plants-cannabis sativa-single 3.JPG

 

An outdoor hemp plantation in the UK. This particular varietal of Cannabis sativa is “industrial hemp” which contains ultra-low levels of Delta-THC and other cannabinoids, which makes it useless for recreational/medicinal purposes.

By:  Nabokov

Wikipedia.org

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ReasonTV ReasonTV

 

Published on Feb 26, 2014

While Washington State is still adjusting to many changes since legalizing recreational marijuana—from growing space size to the number of licenses to give out—one of the biggest changes may be Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) employees going to work in the private sector. Reason TV sat down with Patrick Moen, a former supervisory special agent with the DEA, who now works as compliance director and senior counsel at Privateer Holdings, a private equity firm that invests in cannabis.

“The more law enforcement officers acknowledge that prohibition [of marijuana] is wrong, the better off society is going to be,” said Moen. At the DEA he specialized in wiretaps and worked on cases varying from busting heroin and methamphetamine rings to rooting out pot and painkiller dealers. “Taking that first step is often the most difficult one, it just so happened that I was the one to take it.”

Moen says that he got a lot of support from friends and former colleagues, the latter of which privately asked him for jobs. He says people may be surprised to know that an overwhelming majority of agents he interacted with didn’t feel marijuana should be a priority for the DEA.

“Well, my own personal point of view is that drugs like methamphetamine and heroin have legitimate, observable, harmful effects to the user and people around the user and you definitely cannot say the same thing about cannabis,” says Moen.

Reason TV presented Moen with numbers from the Department of Justice’s 2013 National Drug Threat Assessment indicating an increase in the availability of methamphetamine and heroin in the U.S.

“There are some cases of mine in particular that I am very proud of that I can look back at and say that I had a measurable effect on this community for some period of time before it bounced back,” says Moen. “I don’t think anyone was under the illusion that we were going to stop it, that we were going to win the war on drugs.”

Moen is aware of the criticism of the DEA and the war on drugs in general.

“I think there is a certain subset of the population that views DEA agents as jackbooted thugs, that have an agenda to oppress them…. But it’s just another job, and there are guys there that are competent, and there are guys there that are less so, but they are all trying to do the job the best that they can.”

Privateer Holdings is looking to invest in businesses that surround the legal marijuana industry like the cannabis review site, Leafly.com, which also helps users find different strains and locations of cannabis around them. Leafly claims to have a website and app that generate more than more than 2.3 million visits a month.

The private cannabis industry isn’t without worries though. CEO at Privateer Holdings, Brenden Kennedy, told Bloomberg TV on January 28, that banking in the marijuana industry was nearly impossible because banks were concerned with the taboo nature of the product. “We have been kicked out of two banks, two large banks, very unceremoniously,” said Kennedy, who also said at least one employee at Privateer Holdings had experienced trouble with his personal bank account.

“The biggest risk we see is from the federal government. Bureaucrats and politicians are always the last ones to accept change,” said Kennedy.

Approximately 10:07.

Produced and edited by Paul Detrick. Shot by Alex Manning. Music is “A Freak” by Moby.

Visit http://reason.com/reasontv for downloadable versions and subscribe to Reason TV’s YouTube Channel to receive automatic updates when new material goes live.

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Did the Government Give Industrial Hemp a Pass to Clean Up Radiation in the States?

Christina Sarich

NationofChange / News Analysis

Published: Friday 14 February 2014

Hemp has numerous uses and could replace many crops that require heavy irrigation and pesticides, but the most interesting fact about hemp is that it “eats” radiation.

Article image

Activists have been shouting they want an end to GMO foods for more than a decade now, and Cannabis Sattiva L. supporters have been at it for even longer, so why has the US government finally given farmers the right to legally grow industrial hemp, the non-hallucinatory, sister plant of medical marijuana?

It is safe to say that industrialized hemp should have been legalized years ago. With THC levels so low, you would have to smoke more of it than Snoop Dogg to get ‘high’ – and that’s a lot of Cannabis, it is ridiculous that it was classified as a drug at all. It has numerous uses and could replace many crops that require heavy irrigation and pesticides, like cotton, for example. Here’s the most interesting fact though – hemp plants ‘eat’ radiation.

When the Chernobyl Nuclear Plant Reactor 4 accident caused severe radioactive contamination in 1986, families within a 30-kilometer area of the site had to be evacuated. Radioactive contamination was later found at 100 kilometers from the accident site, and Fukushima radiation levels are still to be determined, with the Japanese government planning on dumping their overflowing radiated water tanks into the Pacific as we speak.

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Collective-Evolution

Collective Evolution

New Plastic ‘Zeoform’ Turns Hemp Into Almost Anything

January 28, 2014 by

What if today’s plastics could be made from materials that were not only sustainable but non toxic? Today, our plastics are made from oil which means not only are we putting toxic chemicals into our atmosphere, but we are also filling our environment with products that cannot bio-degrade. 

A new company out of Australia has created a promising new product called Zeoform and it is made only from water and cellulose take  from hemp plants. This means their plastic is not only eco-friendly in production but is also biodegradable!

As stated on their website:

Zeoform is a revolutionary material that changes everything. Made from cellulose fibres and water – and absolutely nothing else! Our patented process converts cellulose fibres into a super strong high tech moulding material capable of being formed into a multitude of products. ZEOFORM is 100% non-toxic, biodegradable and ‘locks up’ carbon from waste into beautiful, functional forms.

zoeform_chair

According to Zeoform, their product is very durable and relies only on the natural process of hydrogen bonding that takes place when cellulose fibres are mixed with water. No glue or bonding material is necessary because the bond created is already so strong. The final material can be formed into almost anything and can be cut, routed, machined, drilled, screwed, nailed and glued in the same way wood and wood composites can be. It can also be coloured/dyed, and finished in any way creators like.

Read More  and Watch Video Here

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MOXNEWSd0tC0M MOXNEWSd0tC0M

 

Published on Jan 5, 2014

January 04, 2014 MSNBC News

 

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Crain's New York Business

Medical marijuana may not be kind to hospitals

Health systems that participate in Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s plan to distribute medical marijuana could run afoul of federal laws—jeopardizing their government funding, drug advocates say.

By

Updated: January 7, 2014 6:15 p.m.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s plan to legalize medical marijuana program could put hospitals in a bind. Marijuana advocates say hospitals in other states where medical pot is legal have steered clear of distributing the drug for fear of running afoul of federal laws—and possibly losing government funding.

An executive order Mr. Cuomo intends to announce at his State of the State address Wednesday in Albany would use a 1980 state law to allow 20 hospitals in New York to distribute the drug to patients suffering from cancer, glaucoma or other “approved” diseases, according to the law named after Antonio Oliveri, a former city councilman and assemblyman who died from a brain tumor and advocated marijuana as a drug that could relieve the side effects of chemotherapy.

The law, however, does not explicitly allow hospitals to buy the drug or to sell it to patients. Medical marijuana advocates say the “Olivieri law” only allows for the use of marijuana that comes from the federal government or local drug busts, which may not be medical grade marijuana. That could make it difficult for hospitals to make money on a pot program. It would also mean a medical marijuana program would have to be funded through the state Department of Health, health care industry experts said.

“They would presumably have to find money somewhere for testing the purity and safety of the seized marijuana and packaging it,” said Assemblyman Richard Gottfried (D-Manhattan). “There would be considerable staff and administrative expenses for the department.”

 

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• Andrew Cuomo in surprise reverse of hardline position

• Small but significant change to highly restrictive laws

Governor Andrew Cuomo
Governor Andrew Cuomo at the inauguration of New York City’s Mayor Bill de Blasio on January 1, who has set a liberal agenda. Photograph: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

New York is poised to become the latest US state to relax its laws covering marijuana. Governor Andrew Cuomo will make a surprise turnaround in policy later this week, to allow limited use of the drug for medical purposes.

As Colorado residents continue to flock to their local pot shops, after their state became from 1 January the first to allow the sale and possession of cannabis for recreational purposes, signs have emerged that New York will now make a small but important amendment to some of the strictest laws on the drug in the US. Cuomo is expected to announce an executive action in his annual state of the state address on 8 January, to permit a small number of hospitals to prescribe marijuana for medical use in the treatment of serious illnesses including cancer and glaucoma, the New York Times reported on Sunday.

Cuomo, a Democrat, has always been staunchly against legalising cannabis, including for medical use. Even though the likely announcement would only loosen restrictions on the drug very slightly, it will be seen as a significant move at a time when a number of states are liberalising their laws in ways ranging from the use of medical marijuana to decriminalising basic possession of the drug, up to full recreational use. Voters in Washington state have also voted to allow recreational marijuana and it is expected to follow Colorado later this year and become the second state to implement such laws.

More than 20 states currently have laws allowing a variety of medical uses of marijuana.

Cuomo is expected to emphasise that medical marijuana will only be allowed for a tightly circumscribed list of illnesses, to be drawn up by the state Department of Health.

By announcing a unilateral executive action, the governor will sidestep the legislative process in the state capital, Albany, where the senate has repeatedly struck down bills passed in the lower assembly to permit medical marijuana.

Ethan Nadelmann, the executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance, told the New York Times Cuomo’s move was “bold and innovative”.

Even limited medical marijuana use is banned under federal law but the Obama administration has signalled that it is not interested in actively pursuing prosecution in states that have relaxed their laws around the drug. Whether there will be any clash between federal law enforcement and state authorities in Colorado and Washington state remains to be seen.

 

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