Category: Therapy


Vets, Docs Worry Fort Hood Shootings Will Deepen PTSD Stigma

The word “PTSD” had barely left the mouth of Fort Hood’s commander late Wednesday when, across the nation, many veterans with those symptoms and doctors who treat the malady understood they faced a renewed battle: a resurgence of the stigma that comes with that diagnosis.

The Fort Hood tragedy –- 16 wounded and four killed, including identified shooter Ivan Lopez, a soldier being evaluated for PTSD –- is precisely the type of event that makes combat veterans cringe. Many worry they’ll be further mislabeled as dangerous time bombs, as the next to snap, and that post-traumatic stress will again be misrepresented and misunderstood as a condition that sparks public, violent outbursts.

“That is not what post-traumatic stress is or what it does,” said Ingrid Herrera-Yee, a clinical psychologist in the Washington, D.C. area who treats veterans diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and other mental health issues as well as their family members and civilians. Her husband, Army National Guard Staff Sgt. Ian Yee, spent three combat deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan.

“Yes, there is anger and irritability (associated with PTSD), but it’s usually internalized. You’re more likely to see it as someone who is withdrawn, anxious and numb, who’s lost interest in life. Some veterans explain it to me this way: ‘The last thing you want is to go out and lash out,” said Herrera-Yee, adding: “Just like any victims of a trauma –- rape or domestic violence -– they can become fearful of their surroundings, but they’re not going to react angrily toward their surroundings. For them, it’s all about avoidance.”

“You’re more likely to see it as someone who is withdrawn, anxious and numb, who’s lost interest in life. Some veterans explain it to me this way: ‘The last thing you want is to go out and lash out.’”

For years, Pentagon brass and branch commanders have urged troops and veterans to seek mental-health help if they feel the need, while repeating the message that, if they do see a doctor, they will not be viewed as weak but as strong. That campaign seems to have finally dented the macho-military mantra that every soldier can handle his or her own business. Many veterans are turning to doctors to begin addressing post-service anxiety issues, often fueled by repeated or long deployments.

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March 29, 2014

There is a little known bill in the works which would force people in crisis into forced psychiatric treatment. Mad in America reported on March 28, 2014 that mental health advocates are urging protest against a forced treatment addition to a new Medicare bill. Many national mental health and disability advocacy groups have joined together to urge people to contact their senators in order to protest a section of a bill which was rushed through the House of Representatives by voice vote this week. This bill, Section 224 of HR4302, is up for a vote in the Senate on Monday.

Raymond Bridge, public policy director of the National Coalition for Mental Health Recovery has said: “In its rush to fix a problem with Medicare, the House passed a bill including a highly controversial program, involuntary outpatient commitment, with no debate and no roll call vote.” It appears to Bridge that the Senate may pass a version of the House bill which includes this troublesome provision on Monday. Daniel Fisher, M.D., Ph.D. has commented about this bill, saying: “It would bring America back to the dark ages before de-institutionalization, when people with mental health conditions languished in institutions, sometimes for life.”

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Mental Health Advocates Decry Forced Treatment Provision in “Doc Fix” Bill

 

WASHINGTON, March 28, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — The bill rushed through the House of Representatives by voice vote yesterday to patch Medicare regulations includes a highly controversial provision that has nothing to do with Medicare, and that would subject people in crisis to forced treatment. Studies have shown that such force causes trauma and drives people away from treatment, mental health advocates warned.

Today, an array of national mental health and disability advocacy groups joined together to decry this provision, which they view as a regressive attack on hundreds of thousands of Americans with serious mental health conditions.

“In its rush to fix a problem with Medicare, the House passed a bill including a highly controversial program, involuntary outpatient commitment, with no debate and no roll call vote,” said Raymond Bridge, public policy director of the National Coalition for Mental Health Recovery (NCMHR), a coalition of 32 statewide organizations and others representing individuals with mental illnesses. “And it seems that the Senate may pass a version of the House bill including this troubling provision on Monday,” Bridge added.

The 123-page Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014, H.R. 4302, includes a four-year, $60 million grant program (Sec. 224) to expand involuntary outpatient commitment (IOC) – also called Assisted Outpatient Treatment (AOT) – in states that have laws authorizing IOC. The laws allow courts to mandate someone with a serious mental illness to follow a specific treatment plan, usually requiring medication. The facts show that involuntary outpatient commitment is not effective, involves high costs with minimal returns, is not likely to reduce violence, and that there are more effective alternatives.

Assisted Outpatient Treatment is central to the controversial Helping Families in Mental Health Crisis Act (H.R. 3717), proposed by Rep. Tim Murphy in December 2013.

“This legislation would eliminate initiatives that use evidence-based, voluntary, peer-run services and family supports to help people diagnosed with serious mental illnesses to recover,” said Daniel Fisher, M.D., Ph.D., a psychiatrist and an NCMHR founder. “It would bring America back to the dark ages before de-institutionalization, when people with mental health conditions languished in institutions, sometimes for life.”

The provisions of H.R. 3717 would exchange low-cost, community-based services with good outcomes for high-cost yet ineffective interventions, according to the NCMHR; the National Disability Rights Network (NDRN), the non-profit membership organization for the federally mandated Protection and Advocacy (P&A) Systems and Client Assistance Programs (CAP) for individuals with disabilities; and the National Council on Independent Living (NCIL), which advances independent living and the rights of people with disabilities through consumer-driven advocacy.

 

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Young cancer survivor will get experimental treatment

A 7-year-old boy who has beaten cancer four times but whose weakened immune system is being threatened by a rare virus will start receiving an experimental treatment within 48 hours after the drug’s manufacturer reached an agreement with federal officials for a pilot trial to begin immediately.

The boy, Josh Hardy, will be the first patient to be enrolled Wednesday in the new study of the drug, brincidofovir, the Durham, N.C.-based company, Chimerix, announced late Tuesday.

Earlier the company had said it could not release the drug to Josh outside of clinical trials. The boy’s family had been pleading with the company to change its mind.

1904169-667793373261832-408634175-n.jpg

Josh Hardy is seen in this undated photo from the SaveJosh Facebook page. Used with permission from William Burns
Personal photo

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration agreed to the pilot trial of brincidofovir for the treatment of adenovirus infections in immune-compromised patients, the company said in a statement late Tuesday. The FDA will work expeditiously with Chimerix to design a Phase 3 study that would be a continuation of the pilot trial, the company said.

“Josh Hardy’s story brought to public attention the often-devastating impact of adenovirus infection, and helped accelerate a discussion between the FDA and Chimerix regarding the need for additional clinical development to assess brincidofovir’s potential in adenovirus infection,” Kenneth I. Moch, Chimerix’s president and CEO, said in a statement.

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FORBES

Matthew Herper Forbes Staff

Pharma & Healthcare 3/11/2014 @ 9:12PM 4,486 views

Company Makes Drug Available To Ailing Boy Following Public Outcry

Chimerix, a small and unprofitable biotechnology company, will make an experimental drug available to a young Virginia boy who is suffering from an infection he contracted while being treated for cancer.

Chimerix originally said it could not ethically provide the drug to one patient without opening the floodgates to others, presenting it with a huge operational burden that might prevent the drug, brincidofovir, from ever reaching patients. The story of the boy, Joshua Hardy, was shared on CNN, USA Today, The Huffington Post, and generated a large volume of posts on the social networking site Twitter under the hashtag #savejosh. This evening, Chimerix, based in Durham, North Carolina, issued a press release saying that it was going to start a new, 20-patient clinical trial for the treatment of adenovirus (the virus brincidofovir treats) in immunocompromised patients. The first immunocompromised patient, dosed tomorrow morning, will be Josh Hardy.

“This 20-patient open-label study underscores Chimerix’s mission to develop innovative antiviral therapies in areas of high unmet need – for everyone,” said Chimerix Chief Executive Kenneth I. Moch in his company’s press release. “Being unable to fulfill requests for compassionate use is excruciating, and not a decision any one of us ever wants to have to make. It is essential that each individual in a health crisis be treated with equal gravity and value, a principle we have upheld by pursuing further clinical study of brincidofovir that will inform its use in adenovirus and other serious DNA viral infections.”

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Lucas Camacho

Even a $1 donation will help make a difference.  Help make a difference Today.

Lucas Camacho Personal Image

Join me in my efforts to support Jump Rope For Heart or Hoops For Heart! Even the smallest of donations make a big difference.

Earned Badges

I need your support!Hi,

We only have one heart! I want to take care of mine and help you take care of yours too! This year, I have set a personal goal to raise money for the American Heart Association at my school.
Heart Disease can happen to anyone so it’s really important to be physically active and eat healthy. Did you know that heart disease is our nation’s number one killer? Help me become a lifesaver!
Will you make a donation to help me reach my goal? It’s fast and easy to do on my personal webpage. Just use the link below to support me today!
Your contribution will support the American Heart Association’s work to:
- Put up-to-the-minute research into doctors’ hands so they can better prevent and treat heart disease among patients.
- Fund groundbreaking pediatric heart and stroke research.
- Train more than 9 million health professionals and others each year in emergency cardiovascular care.
Please support me in my efforts – together we can save lives! Thank you very much!

Follow This Link to visit my personal web page and help me in my efforts to support YM-GSA

…..

I’m joining millions of others to help save lives with the American Heart Association!

At my school, I’m learning how I can help make a difference by raising lifesaving donations to help kids with heart disease. I’m also learning about my own heart, and how to keep it healthy. And I’m getting active!

I’m excited about raising money for other kids – kids with hearts that don’t exactly work right and to help fund new medicines and treatments to be discovered.

Please help me make a difference! Thank you!

Welcome to the Donation Page of

Lucas Camacho

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Vitamin C, Shingles, and Vaccination

by Thomas E. Levy, MD, JD

The pharmaceutical industry, and many doctors, appear to be making great efforts by to get as many people as possible vaccinated against shingles. Even if such an intervention was highly effective in preventing shingles, which certainly has not been shown to be the case, the information below should make it clear that such vaccinations are unnecessary. The side effects that would be suffered by a significant number of individuals need never occur in the first place. The real problem is that what is discussed below generates relatively little income for anybody in the healthcare industry. Regardless, you need to decide for yourself.

Shingles is an infection resulting from the varicella zoster virus, usually manifesting in areas supplied by spinal nerves, known as dermatomes. More commonly known in medical circles as Herpes zoster, the infection is typically characterized by a blistering skin rash of extraordinary pain for most individuals. The initial infection with the virus is usually remote from the shingles outbreak, typically occurring in childhood when chickenpox is contracted. For years the virus remains latent in nerve cell bodies or autonomic ganglia. It is when the virus, for unclear reasons, breaks out of these storage sites and travels down the nerve axons that shingles occurs.

Left to itself along with mainstream therapies that include analgesics, antiviral agents like acyclovir, and corticosteroids, the rash will generally resolve in two to four weeks. The pain is generally lessened little by analgesics. Some unfortunate individuals can experience postherpetic neuralgia, a syndrome of residual nerve pain that can continue for months or years following a shingles outbreak.

Treatment of Shingles with Vitamin C

The clinical response of shingles to vitamin C therapy is decidedly different from its response to traditional therapies. While there are not many reports in the literature on vitamin C and shingles, the studies that do exist are striking. Frederick Klenner, MD, who pioneered the effective use of vitamin C in a wide variety of infections and toxin exposures, published the results of his vitamin C therapy on eight patients with shingles. He gave 2,000 to 3,000 mg of vitamin C by injection every 12 hours, supplemented by 1,000 mg in fruit juice by mouth every two hours. In seven of the eight patients treated in this manner, complete pain relief was reported within two hours of the first vitamin C injection. All patients received a total of five to seven vitamin C injections. Having had shingles myself years before I knew of the efficacy of vitamin C therapy, I can assert that this is nothing short of a stunning result on what is usually a painful and debilitating disease.

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• Andrew Cuomo in surprise reverse of hardline position

• Small but significant change to highly restrictive laws

Governor Andrew Cuomo
Governor Andrew Cuomo at the inauguration of New York City’s Mayor Bill de Blasio on January 1, who has set a liberal agenda. Photograph: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

New York is poised to become the latest US state to relax its laws covering marijuana. Governor Andrew Cuomo will make a surprise turnaround in policy later this week, to allow limited use of the drug for medical purposes.

As Colorado residents continue to flock to their local pot shops, after their state became from 1 January the first to allow the sale and possession of cannabis for recreational purposes, signs have emerged that New York will now make a small but important amendment to some of the strictest laws on the drug in the US. Cuomo is expected to announce an executive action in his annual state of the state address on 8 January, to permit a small number of hospitals to prescribe marijuana for medical use in the treatment of serious illnesses including cancer and glaucoma, the New York Times reported on Sunday.

Cuomo, a Democrat, has always been staunchly against legalising cannabis, including for medical use. Even though the likely announcement would only loosen restrictions on the drug very slightly, it will be seen as a significant move at a time when a number of states are liberalising their laws in ways ranging from the use of medical marijuana to decriminalising basic possession of the drug, up to full recreational use. Voters in Washington state have also voted to allow recreational marijuana and it is expected to follow Colorado later this year and become the second state to implement such laws.

More than 20 states currently have laws allowing a variety of medical uses of marijuana.

Cuomo is expected to emphasise that medical marijuana will only be allowed for a tightly circumscribed list of illnesses, to be drawn up by the state Department of Health.

By announcing a unilateral executive action, the governor will sidestep the legislative process in the state capital, Albany, where the senate has repeatedly struck down bills passed in the lower assembly to permit medical marijuana.

Ethan Nadelmann, the executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance, told the New York Times Cuomo’s move was “bold and innovative”.

Even limited medical marijuana use is banned under federal law but the Obama administration has signalled that it is not interested in actively pursuing prosecution in states that have relaxed their laws around the drug. Whether there will be any clash between federal law enforcement and state authorities in Colorado and Washington state remains to be seen.

 

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NHK Documentary: “Origins of Disease Episode 3: Depression – Legacy of the Survival Instinct”-

MissingSky101 MissingSky101

 

Published on Nov 17, 2013

Depression causes people to feel sad or down for a long period of time. More than 350 million people suffer from this disease worldwide. Depression was once considered an illness of the mind. But doctors have found physical abnormalities in the brains of people being treated for depression. Now scientists are coming up with a range of treatments, including one that directly controls brain function. How can we overcome depression? We’ll look into the origins of this all-too-common disease.

I apologize for the poor quality of the video. The problem is a broadcast issue.

Thank you to the special person who requested this upload :)

 

 

 

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breakingtheset

 

Published on Nov 19, 2013

Abby Martin speaks with musical artist Moby, discussing his activism, the failures of the corporate music industry, and why he is a vegan.

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FOLLOW Abby Martin @ http://twitter.com/AbbyMartin

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MissingSky101 MissingSky101

Published on Nov 11, 2013

Note:
This video does not pertain to any radiation issues from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant meltdown. “Healing Children through Art” is a message of hope, support, encouragement and love for the children living in the disaster stricken area of Tohoku.

Healing Children through Art

Ms. Harumi Torii, Founder of Kids Earth Fund, believes in the healing power of creative activities. She holds variety of events to help children in the disaster area to freely express their feelings through painting. One day she shows some children a big canvas and encourages them to complete a painting of artistic messages from children around the world. This is a story of how traumatized children reacted and were comforted through heart to heart exchanges with the world.

Kids Earth Fund
Sadly, even in affluent countries such as Japan there are many children who suffer emotional problems as a result of the damaging influence they have received growing up in a materialistic society. In Japan, KIDS EARTH FUND hosts projects and workshops that are designed to help these children. Professional artist, specialist and musician volunteers design programs that foster children’s imagination and help build their self-esteem and interest in helping others. 1000 children have participated in these Japan-based events.
http://www.kidsearthfund.jp/en/injapa…

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Sep. 22, 2013 at 8:43 AM ET

Hear “anorexia” and you think bone-thin young women — scary-skinny runway models with emaciated figures. But an overlooked group of young people are also struggling with anorexia nervosa: overweight and even obese kids.

Adolescents with a history of obesity are at “significant risk” for developing anorexia, says Dr. Leslie A. Sim, clinical director of the Mayo Clinic’s eating disorders program, in a recent paper in Pediatrics. But because of their size, their symptoms often go unrecognized and untreated, Sim says.

“It’s harder to see that they have an eating disorder because we think they should be dieting; the physician told them to be dieting,” says Sim, who has gathered some not-yet-published data suggesting that about 35 percent of the Mayo Clinic’s anorexic patients have a history of obesity, and that on average, the eating disorders they have go unidentified for about 11 months longer than in their smaller-sized peers.

Most people will probably be surprised or even skeptical to hear that a kid struggling with obesity can also be anorexic, says Lynn Grefe, president of the National Eating Disorders Association. But they shouldn’t be: an estimated 30 million Americans will have an eating disorder sometime in their life, Grefe says.

Taken too far, the anti-obesity movement can mean focusing on thin versus fat, instead of healthy versus unhealthy, which can trigger disordered eating behaviors in some children, both Sim and Grefe agree. Teaching habits such as counting calories or avoiding carbs or calling this food “good” and that food “bad” can all too easily slip into the obsessive eating patterns associated with eating disorders in vulnerable kids, Grefe says.

And that can especially be true for obese or overweight children, who are likely being told implicitly or explicitly by almost every adult in their lives that they’re not OK the way they are. “So they’re just kind of doing what they were told to do, but it gets out of control,” Sim says. “I think these kids are almost more at risk, because of the messages they receive that a kid of normal weight doesn’t get.”

Ali Hougnou

Ali Hougnou
In this photo, taken during Ali Hougnou’s sophomore year, the teenager was around her heaviest weight.

When Ali Hougnou was a little kid, she was a normal weight. But after her parents divorced when she was 9, she used food to try to quiet her heartache. She steadily gained weight for years, and by age 15 she weighed 200 pounds. At 5’5”, that put her body mass index – a way of measuring body fat using height and weight — at 33. (A BMI of 30 or higher is considered obese.)

She tried diets and exercise, but nothing would make the weight come off, until the summer before 10th grade, when she spent some time with her godmother’s family in Spokane, Wash. It was like an accidental fat camp: she ate the same healthful, organic foods her hosts did, and was outdoors and active in the same the way they lived, and easily lost 15 pounds. Back home, her classmates finally stopped teasing her about her weight; they started complimenting her instead. “And the more people told her how great she looked, the more she stopped eating,” her mom, Tammy Carlisle of Long Island, N.Y., says.

Over her sophomore year, Hougnou lost nearly 40 percent of her body weight. She felt faint and lightheaded all day long, and at one point, all she ate were 80-calorie cups of nonfat yogurt: one for breakfast, one for lunch, and one for dinner. She was wasting away, but all anyone seemed to care about was that she wasn’t fat anymore.

“To everyone else, and even to myself, I was just dieting,” Hougnou says. “I was doing exactly what the doctor had wanted. The pediatricians were so pleased with my weight loss.”

Because we have the idea that “any weight loss is good for an obese person, no matter what – even if the person is not eating all day, or purging or vomiting,” Sim says. “I think, too, what happens is (pediatricians) are so distracted by their perceived responsibility to prevent obesity in their patients that they’re like, ‘Oh, this is great, you’re losing weight,’ and they don’t ask, ‘Well, how are you losing weight?’”

Hougnou’s therapist advised her mom that the teenager was showing some signs of disordered eating, though there were no outward signs — she was a healthy size 4. Around that same time, the girl’s best friend told the school principal, who then told Hougnou’s mom, that Hougnou kept her locker stocked with all kinds of diet stuff: diet pills, “juice cleanse” drinks, diuretics.

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