Category: Nutrition

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CARE2  Green Living

10 Health Benefits of Honey

Discover the health benefits of one of the oldest sweeteners on earth, plus some interesting trivia, some great recipes and a few cautions.

Bees swallow, digest and regurgitate nectar to make honey; this nectar contains almost 600 compounds. We need our bees, so let’s do everything we can to save them and keep them here on this earth.

Honey is so good we have included it in our list of powerfoods that should be in your kitchen right now.

“My son, eat thou honey, for it is good” — King Solomon – Proverbs: 24:13

Health Benefits:

1. Prevent cancer and heart disease:
Honey contains flavonoids, antioxidants which help reduce the risk of some cancers and heart disease.

2. Reduce ulcers and other gastrointestinal disorders.
Recent research shows that honey treatment may help disorders such as ulcers and bacterial gastroenteritis. This may be related to the 3rd benefit…

3. Anti-bacterial, anti-fungal :
“All honey is antibacterial, because the bees add an enzyme that makes hydrogen peroxide,” said Peter Molan, director of the Honey Research Unit at the University of Waikato in New Zealand.

4. Increase athletic performance.
Ancient Olympic athletes would eat honey and dried figs to enhance their performance. This has now been verified with modern studies, showing that it is superior in maintaining glycogen levels and improving recovery time than other sweeteners.


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Natural Alternative ADHD Treatment
 Anna Tai, RDN, CSP. CEO/Founder

Contrary to popular belief, you don’t need to drink milk or eat cheese and yogurt to get your calcium. For some people, the choice to avoid dairy is medical.

How Much Calcium Do We Need?

Current calcium recommendation by age:

Infant 0-6 mos – 200mg/d; 6-12 mos – 260mg/d.
Children 1-3 yo – 700mg/d; 4-8yo – 1,000mg/d; 9-18yo 1,300mg/d.
Adult 19-50yo – 1,000mg/d; more if female older than 50 and male older than 70.

One cup of cow’s milk has about 296 mg. Below is a list of 15 non dairy sources of calcium that comes close to the calcium content of cow’s milk:

One ounce of almonds (23 nuts) has 75 mg.

Blackstrap Molasses
One tablespoon has about 137 mg.

Brazil Nuts
Two ounces of Brazil nuts (12 nuts) have 90 mg.

Two cups of boiled broccoli have 124 mg.

Two cups of raw celery have 81 mg.


Read More Here

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Vitamin D is crucial to bone health and also supports the heart, lungs, and immune system. Unfortunately, many people do not get enough of it in their diets nor do they venture outside often enough to get it naturally from that burning star in the sky. A lack of vitamin D can lead to weak bones, joint pain, and may even lead to rickets. If you’re low on this vitamin intake, read on to learn about some of the best natural sources of vitamin D that you can add to your diet.


Mushrooms, more specifically shiitake and button mushrooms, are excellent source of vitamin D. The dried versions of these mushrooms are equally abundant as their fresh options. To get the benefits of the vitamin D, make sure the mushrooms were dried in the sun.


Holy mackerel, that fish is full of vitamin D! A regular 3-oz portions of this fish will deliver almost 90% of your daily vitamin D needs. Mackerel and other fish are also rich in omega-3s and other nutrients that support over health.

Sockeye Salmon

Similar to the mackerel, a traditional serving of sockeye salmon (about 3 oz) will deliver up to 90% of your necessary vitamin D. The key here is to make sure it is salmon that is wild-caught and not farm-raised.


Apparently if you’re low on this vitamin, seafood is a good place to turn to remedy that. Catfish is another ocean creature that is full of it. This is because it makes a habit of feeding on plankton, which produce vitamin D from the sunlight they take in. Another seafood option that is a rich source of this vitamin is herring, as it also feeds off vitamin D-rich plankton.


Tuna is already enjoyed by many people, either fresh, in sushi, raw, or in a nice tuna salad sandwich. Good news is that this tuna is another great source of vitamin D that so many of us are lacking. Tuna is another oily fish that supports brain health and function. Again, be sure to opt for the wild-caught choice is possible.

Cod Liver Oil

Imagine that, another fishy element that is full of what you need. Cod liver oil is extremely high in omega-3s and vitamin D and has been shown to help treat osteoporosis. You can usually find the supplement in your local grocery store.


Eggs are another great natural source, although they aren’t as rich in the vitamin as our fish friends mentioned previously. However, one egg will provide you with 10% of your DV of vitamin D needs, which is certainly better than nothing!

In addition to adding these vitamin D rich foods to your diet, you do need to make sure you get some sunlight. Of course you have to balance this carefully and make sure to wear protective clothing and avoid getting a sunburn. If you incorporate some (or even better, all) of these natural sources into your diet, deficiency of the vitamin will not be in your future.


You may also like:

Sasha Brown is a Certified Herbalist with a zeal for the natural things in life. For more tips on healthy living, follow her on Facebook or visit her website There you’ll find posts on natural remedies, healthy foods, recipes, natural cleaning methods, gardening techniques, and so much more.


About NaturalNews

The NaturalNews Network is a non-profit collection of public education websites covering topics that empower individuals to make positive changes in their health, environmental sensitivity, consumer choices and informed skepticism. The NaturalNews Network is owned and operated by Truth Publishing International, Ltd., a Taiwan corporation. It is not recognized as a 501(c)3 non-profit in the United States, but it operates without a profit incentive, and its key writer, Mike Adams, receives absolutely no payment for his time, articles or books other than reimbursement for items purchased in order to conduct product reviews.

The vast majority of our content is freely given away at no charge. We offer thousands of articles and dozens of downloadable reports and guides (like the Honest Food Guide) that are designed to educate and empower individuals, families and communities so that they may experience improved health, awareness and life fulfillment.

Learn More About Natural News Here

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Edible Vegetable Oil consumption

by Brian Shilhavy
Health Impact News

Scientists in California recently published a study investigating the effects of saturated versus unsaturated fat in the diets of mice, as well as fructose, on obesity and diabetes. The unsaturated fat was soybean oil, and the saturated fat was coconut oil, along with a fructose.

Soybean oil came out the clear loser when looking at the dietary effect on obesity and diabetes. The researchers found:

Taken together, our results indicate that in mice a diet high in soybean oil is more detrimental to metabolic health than a diet high in fructose or coconut oil.

The title of the study, published in PLoS One, is Soybean Oil Is More Obesogenic and Diabetogenic than Coconut Oil and Fructose in Mouse: Potential Role for the Liver

USDA Dietary Advice Flawed

This is bad news for Americans, as soybean oil has most of the market share in the U.S. edible oil industry, and is the most common dietary oil found in processed foods. Most of the U.S. soybean crop is also genetically modified. If you see an ingredient on a package that says “vegetable oil,” chances are pretty good that it is soybean oil. While coconut oil has made great strides in the U.S. market in recent years, it is still only about 4% of the U.S. edible oil market.

We can blame government nutritional policy on deciding which fats and oils are healthy and which ones are not, which historically has been based more on politics than real nutrition science.


Read More Here

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Eat More Nuts to Lower Cancer Risks

The medical industry is losing the cancer battle. Arm yourself with cancer-fighting nuts. 

Despite a decades-long, multi-billion dollar war on cancer, the global burden of this deadly disease is expected to rise 50% in just the next five years.[i] A handful of nuts a day could help protect you.

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic and the University of Minnesota took note of science finding that nuts are heart healthy.  They asked whether nuts could also protect against cancer.  They conducted a meta-analysis of 36 observational studies including 30,708 patients on the disease-preventive powers of nut consumption. They included 16 cohort studies along with 20 case-control studies.

Their results published in Nutrition Reviews concluded that nut consumption was linked with an overall decrease in cancer risk.  In particular, it was inversely associated with risk of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, and pancreatic cancer.[ii]

The combined studies which ranged from 4.6 to 30 years of follow-up found that, compared to patients eating the least nuts, those consuming the most nuts had:

In addition, those eating more nuts had a 15% lower risk of cancer in general.


Read More Here



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Fight heart disease and lower cancer risk with a daily dose of nuts

(NaturalNews) Nuts have long been a popular snack food. Inexpensive, readily plentiful and easy to pack for traveling, the large variety of nuts available virtually ensures that almost everyone will find a favorite. As if that were not enough, there are a number of health benefits that can result from eating a handful of nuts on a daily basis.

Recent study affirms the benefits of eating nuts

The New England Journal of Medicine published a study recently that highlighted just how well nuts protect a person’s health. People who ate just one serving of nuts each day had a significantly reduced incidence of heart disease. In fact, adding a daily dose of nuts resulted in a close to 30% lower risk of heart disease. In addition, over the course of the study, those people who ate nuts on a daily basis were 20% less likely to die of any cause compared to those people who did not eat nuts.

A collaboration shows results.

Three esteemed medical institutions — Harvard Medical School, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital — charted the results of two studies in an effort to correlate a connection between nut consumption and increased health benefits. The Health Professionals’ Follow-up Study followed 42,000 men over the course of 25 years, while the Nurses’ Health Study followed 76,000 women for more than 30 years. Every few years, participants in both studies filled out surveys with questions detailing their lifestyle choices, including their diets.

Other benefits of eating nuts

Not only did researchers find that people who ate a serving of nuts daily had a 29% reduction in the amounts of deaths from heart disease, but there was also a reduction in deaths from cancer. These deaths fell about 11%. A serving size of nuts is about the same amount that is available in a bag of nuts purchased from a vending machine.

Removing other factors

Researchers found that people who often ate a serving of nuts each day also tended to be healthier than those people who did not include nuts in their regular diets. The nut-eaters were more likely to be thinner, be nonsmokers, consume healthy foods regularly and engage in exercise regularly than those people who did not eat nuts. Even though all these factors could influence the death and disease rates of the study participants, researchers used statistical methods to remove the other factors.

The researchers found that the type of nut did not influence the results. Participants benefited from eating nuts whether they consumed peanuts or one of the varieties of tree nuts. Tree nuts are considered to be cashews, almonds, pistachios, walnuts and pecans. Because nuts can be high in calories, the FDA recommends limiting their consumption to 1.5 ounces each day.


About the author:
Sofiya has written articles on most health-related topics, including traditional medicine, alternative and naturopathic and natural treatments,health insurance, wellness, medical marijuana, diets and fitness.

More articles from Dr. Sofia:

5 Tips for Choosing a Health Insurance Company

Tips for Buying Affordable Health Insurance Policy

Top 8 Tips To Choose A Health Insurance Plan


About NaturalNews

The NaturalNews Network is a non-profit collection of public education websites covering topics that empower individuals to make positive changes in their health, environmental sensitivity, consumer choices and informed skepticism. The NaturalNews Network is owned and operated by Truth Publishing International, Ltd., a Taiwan corporation. It is not recognized as a 501(c)3 non-profit in the United States, but it operates without a profit incentive, and its key writer, Mike Adams, receives absolutely no payment for his time, articles or books other than reimbursement for items purchased in order to conduct product reviews.

The vast majority of our content is freely given away at no charge. We offer thousands of articles and dozens of downloadable reports and guides (like the Honest Food Guide) that are designed to educate and empower individuals, families and communities so that they may experience improved health, awareness and life fulfillment.

Learn More About Natural News Here

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About one-third of the world’s crops depend on the honeybees for pollination. The past decades honeybees have been dying at an alarming rate. Fewer bees will eventually lead to less availability of our favorite whole foods and it will also drive up the prices of many of the fruits and veggies we eat on a daily basis.

While some actions have been taken in the past, our bees are still dying and something needs to be done to make sure our most favorite foods don’t go into extinction.

What’s Causing Massive Bee Deaths?

About fifty years ago our world looked a whole lot different. Bees had an abundance of flowers to feast on and there were fewer pests and diseases threatening their food chain. These days however, nature has to make place for industrialization and our bees are having a hard time finding good pollen and nectar.

And if clearing their dinner tables from good quality food wasn’t bad enough already, farmers are extensively using herbicides and insecticides, which cause a phenome called Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) where bees get disorientated and poisoned and can’t find their way back to the hive. Or when they manage to get back, they die from intoxication.

“We need good, clean food, and so do our pollinators. If bees do not have enough to eat, we won’t have enough to eat. Dying bees scream a message to us that they cannot survive in our current agricultural and urban environments,” states Marla Spivak, an American entomologist, and Distinguished McKnight University Professor at the University of Minnesota.

List of Foods We Will Have To Go without If The Bees Go

While we don’t need bees to pollinate all our food because they either self-pollinate or rely on the wind (like rice, wheat, and corn), many of our favorite foods will disappear from our kitchen tables.

Foods in the danger zone include:

  • Apples
  • Mangos
  • Kiwi Fruit
  • Peaches
  • Berries
  • Onions
  • Pears
  • Alfalfa
  • Cashews
  • Avocados
  • Passion Fruit
  • Beans
  • Cruciferous vegetables
  • Cacao/Coffee
  • Cotton
  • Lemons and limes
  • Carrots
  • Cucumber
  • Cantaloupe
  • Watermelon
  • Coconut
  • Beets
  • Turnips
  • Chili peppers, red peppers, bell peppers, green peppers
  • Papaya
  • Eggplant
  • Vanilla
  • Tomatoes
  • Grapes
  • Many seeds and nuts

A substantial drop in population, or complete extinction, of honeybees will make these food scares or even non-existent. So to keep our body healthy and our kitchen table interesting we have to take action before it is too late.

What You can Do

  • Plant bee friendly plants in your garden or green community space.
  • Limit the use of pesticides or use organic alternatives.
  • Buy local, organically grown produce and honey to support the beekeepers and farmers in your area.
  • Donate to non-profit organizations, like Pollinator Partnership, to help protect, grow, and strengthen bee populations.

Sources: CNNNCBI, and onEarth.

Don’t forget to download my FREE Book “Amy’s Home Kitchen”, packed with my family’s favorite healthy, clean and delicious recipes. Or connect with me on Facebook or Google+

If you are interested in detoxing, clean eating, losing weight, and changing your lifestyle without feeling hungry and counting calories, click here



About NaturalNews

The NaturalNews Network is a non-profit collection of public education websites covering topics that empower individuals to make positive changes in their health, environmental sensitivity, consumer choices and informed skepticism. The NaturalNews Network is owned and operated by Truth Publishing International, Ltd., a Taiwan corporation. It is not recognized as a 501(c)3 non-profit in the United States, but it operates without a profit incentive, and its key writer, Mike Adams, receives absolutely no payment for his time, articles or books other than reimbursement for items purchased in order to conduct product reviews.

The vast majority of our content is freely given away at no charge. We offer thousands of articles and dozens of downloadable reports and guides (like the Honest Food Guide) that are designed to educate and empower individuals, families and communities so that they may experience improved health, awareness and life fulfillment.

Learn More About Natural News Here

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There are many foods that may be hurting your mood, making you sick, and even pushing you toward depression! On the flip side there are many foods that promote your health, give you energy, turbocharge your memory and focus, and improve your mood. These are some of the most effective foods in that category.


80% of the caffeine in the world is consumed as coffee. Prospective studies of men and caffeine use showed a strong inverse association between coffee drinking and depression, with no association for tea or cola. A piece of epidemiology from the Nurses’ Health Study was published in the Archives of Internal Medicine in 2011: Coffee, Caffeine, and Risk of Depression Among Women. So the more the merrier, but forget those weaker brews. Three cohort studies in the past have shown an inverse relationship between coffee consumption and suicide.


They’re a great alternative to standard spuds as they are rich in folate, plus they are better than white potatoes at keeping blood sugar levels steady. And since folate contributes to the production of serotonin, it may help ward off depression and improve mood. In addition, vitamin B6 helps create dopamine, a mood neurotransmitter that may help combat PMS.


The brain is loaded with receptors for capsaicin. We also know that our brains respond to the heat of capsaicin by releasing endorphins, natural compounds that are related to morphine and have a calming effect.


Peas and beans are good sources of magnesium, a mineral that plays a core role in your body’s energy production. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) lists magnesium as being necessary for more than 300 biochemical reactions in the body.


If you’re more a salad type than a carnivore, spinach is one of your best go-to sources for iron, which helps deliver energy-sustaining oxygen to your cells. It wards off fatigue and aids concentration. It’s also a good source of vitamin B6 and folate, which support the brain’s ability to produce mood-boosting neurotransmitters, such as serotonin.


These super fruits help stave off the brain aging that can lead to slower thought processing. Thank the anthocyanins (antioxidants that lend berries their hues); these substances may work with other compounds in the fruit to block enzymes that short-circuit normal communication between brain cells. Since each type of berry has its own mix of phytochemicals, go for a variety.


They’re one of the best sources of the mood-boosting mineral selenium, which can ward off low mood and anxiety.


While the rind is bitter, it contains a lot of citrulline, as nutrient that relaxes blood vessels by activating the same mechanism as the impotency drug Viagra. This compound also helps the brain get rid of the metabolic waste product ammonia, which can damage neurons. The red flesh of watermelon is bursting with the powerful antioxidant lycopene, much more so actually than the tomato. Studies show you can boost the levels of this important nutrient by up to 40 percent (and beta-carotene by 150 percent) by letting it sit outside the refrigerator at room temperature for several days.


Even if you’re not a guacamole fan, this green fruit can bring you happiness. Avocados contain serotonin, a type of feel-good neurotransmitter in the brain. They’re bursting with depression-fighting folate, mood-lifting tryptophan and stress relieving vitamin B6.


Step away from the white rice and breads, which can cause blood-sugar crashes that leave you dragging. A better sub? Quinoa is a complex carb but also a complete protein that can give you a steady stream of energy. Quinoa is one of the rare plant-based foods that contains all nine of the essential amino acids that your body can’t make itself.


Beets are one of the best sources of the B vitamin folate that is crucial for good mood, memory retrieval, processing speed, and lightning reflexes. Beets are also packed with betaine, which our brain uses to form SAM-e, a natural antidepressant. Uridine, another important nutrient found in these root vegetables, stimulates the production of phosphotidylcholine, a building block of the brain’s synaptic connections, helping to increase your mind’s processing power. A combination of uridine and omega-3s is as effective as prescription antidepressants in animal studies, and trials of uridine combined with omega-3s are being studied in the treatment of bipolar disorder by Harvard University.

12) EGGS

Especially raw, eggs contain a beneficial blend of omega-3 fatty acids, zinc, B vitamins, and iodide, nutrients that work together to battle fatigue and reverse bad moods. They’re a great source of zinc, which helps you to feel more alert and energised by regulating your metabolism and blood sugar levels.


Walnuts are one of the richest dietary sources of serotonin. Providing new evidence that serotonin may be directly absorbed from food into the body, a recent Spanish study found that those who ate a daily 1-ounce combo of walnuts, hazelnuts, and almonds had more of this feel-good substance than a nut-free group.


can balance hunger and mood between meal energy slumps as they help to stabilise blood sugar levels.The fruit’s high vitamin B6 content can help relieve anxiety and stress, and it’s also a great source of tryptophan -the essential amino acid the brain converts into happiness hormone serotonin.


Alliums promote healthy arteries and ensure proper blood flow to the brain. These savory vegetables relax your blood vessels, decreasing your blood pressure, which prevents small strokes in the brain, a major cause of depression and dementia later in life. But more than that, it influences the uptake of tryptophan, the precursor to the important neurotransmitter serotonin. It also enhances the release of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine.


This Is What Happens To Your Cells When You Experience Happiness


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The Mushroom That Regrows Brain Cells

Regrowing brain cells sounds like something straight out of a science fiction novel, not the stuff of scientific research involving mushrooms. After all, when we think of mushrooms we’re far more likely to think of a creamy soup or a side dish of sautéed mushrooms than healing medicines. Yet increasing amounts of research are showcasing the medicinal properties of these fungi.

When it comes to brain health, lion’s mane mushrooms are popping up with increasing frequency in recent medical journals. A large and beautiful-looking white mushroom that derives its name from the long ridges that resemble a lion’s mane, this fungus is showing great promise as a potential treatment for brain and nerve diseases, as well as a memory and mood enhancer.


Lion’s Mane Mushroom Extract

Lion’s Mane Mushroom is one of the most interesting medicinal mushrooms: the tea made from Lion’s Mane mushrooms has been used for centuries in traditional Japanese herbalism, primarily as a “tonic.” The modern scientific research now tells us it was the beta glucans in the mushroom tea that were in fact offering immune support, among other health benefits.*

Recent studies also show that hot water/alcohol extracts of Lion’s Mane mushroom may strengthen memory and concentration and enhance cognitive abilities.* This research indicates that the hot water/alcohol extract of Lion’s Mane may stimulate the synthesis of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) and may promote and accelerate the process of myelination.*


Natural News

Lion’s mane: a smart mushroom choice for memory, mood and clarity


(NaturalNews) Easily grown at home, and a relatively inexpensive therapeutic food, lion’s mane is a beautiful mushroom with cascading spines instead of gills that shows potential in slowing the progression of neurological disorders — including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Research has also found the mushroom to be beneficial in treating symptomatic depression and anxiety associated with menopause.

The secret to the success of lion’s mane is due to abundant erinacines. These compounds enhance the production of nerve growth factor — a protein that encourages the regeneration of neurons. Additionally, the mushroom also protects against brain cell death, which is an important factor in both Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.


Alzheimer’s Disease—Yes, It’s Preventable!

May 22, 2014


By Dr. Mercola

An estimated 5.4 million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease, a severe form of dementia,1 and hundreds of thousands more may suffer from an often misdiagnosed subtype called “hippocampal sparing” Alzheimer’s, according to recent findings.2

The most recent data3, 4 suggests that well over half a million Americans die from Alzheimer’s disease each year, making it the third leading cause of death in the US, right behind heart disease and cancer.

As discussed by Dr. Danielle Ofri in a recent New York Times blog,5 losing your mind, and with it, much of your personality and dignity, is a terrifying proposition. Making matters worse, many doctors shy away from addressing dementia—both with colleagues and their patients.

The reasons are many. Dr. Ofri suggests Alzheimer’s strikes at the emotional heart of many clinicians, whose careers depend on the stability and functioning of their own minds and intelligence. In short, it frightens them too much to talk about it.

However, I strongly disagree with her commentary on the lack of strategies to prevent or modify the course of Alzheimer’s.

“I suspect… that our reticence stems from deeper issues,” Dr. Ofri writes. “All the top 10 killers in America are potentially preventable, or at least modifiable — all except dementia… We have tests to screen for many cancers, and treatments that prolong life… But there’s nothing, really, that we can do about dementia.

There aren’t any screening tests that can pick up the disease before symptoms appear. And even if there were, there aren’t any treatments that make a substantial difference.

For doctors, this is profoundly frustrating. No wonder dementia gets pushed onto the back burner. In the dishearteningly limited time of a medical visit, we’re forced to focus on the diseases we can treat.”

On the contrary, while early diagnostic tests are in short supply and successful treatments are virtually nonexistent, the evidence shows there’s plenty of hope when it comes to prevention!

This is exactly why doctors need to get with the program and start directing their patients toward healthier lifestyles rather than fall into the trap of thinking the situation is hopeless and their patients are helpless victims.

Heart Disease May Increase Your Odds of Developing Alzheimer’s

I firmly believe that since there’s no conventional cure, now or in the foreseeable future, the issue of prevention is absolutely critical if you want to avoid becoming an Alzheimer’s statistic.

Ideally, doctors would begin counseling patients who are in their 20s and 30s on lifestyle strategies that promote heart and brain health throughout life. Then we would probably see a major shift in Alzheimer’s statistics for that generation.

As it stands, the evidence points to lifestyle factors, primarily diet, as the driving forces of dementia. There are also many connections between Alzheimer’s and other dietary-related diseases, such as diabetes and heart disease, suggesting that ALL of these diseases are preventable through identical means.

For example, previous research suggests diabetics have a doubled risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s disease was even tentatively dubbed “type 3 diabetes” in 2005, when researchers discovered that your brain produces insulin that is necessary for the survival of your brain cells.

They found that a toxic protein called ADDL removes insulin receptors from nerve cells, thereby rendering those neurons insulin resistant, and as ADDLs accumulate, your memory begins to deteriorate. Recent research also points out that heart disease increases your odds of developing Alzheimer’s. As reported by

“Researchers found that artery stiffness — a condition called atherosclerosis — is associated with the buildup of beta-amyloid plaque in the brain, a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease.”

‘This is more than just another example of how heart health relates to brain health. It is a signal that the process of vascular aging may predispose the brain to increased amyloid plaque buildup,’ said lead researcher Timothy Hughes…

Plaque builds with age and appears to worsen in those with stiffer arteries, he said. ‘Finding and preventing the causes of plaque buildup is going to be an essential factor in the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease and extending brain health throughout life,’ Hughes added.”

Subtype of Alzheimer’s Disease Is Often Misdiagnosed

In related news, research7, 8 presented at the 2014 American Academy of Neurology’s meeting in Pennsylvania sheds new light on Alzheimer’s cases that are often misdiagnosed. Researchers from the Mayo Clinic believe they have identified a variant of the disease, referred to as “hippocampal sparing” Alzheimer’s, which is thought to affect an estimated 600,000 Americans. As explained by Medical News Today:9

“All subtypes of Alzheimer’s have two specific hallmarks in the brain. Amyloid beta is responsible for the formation of brain plaques, while tau produces tangles in the brain. In order to classify each subtype, the team used tangle counts to create a mathematical algorithm.

They found that while all Alzheimer’s subtypes had the same amount of amyloid beta, the hippocampal sparing variant showed tau tangles in unequal areas of the hippocampus. They discovered that in patients with this subtype, tau specifically damages neurons in areas of the brain associated with behavior, motor recognition and awareness, and use of speech and vision.”

Of the more than 1,800 Alzheimer’s patients included in the study, 11 percent were found to have hippocampal sparing Alzheimer’s, which does not destroy memory to the degree typically associated with Alzheimer’s. Instead, this subtype of the disease tends to alter behavior, causing uncontrollable anger, visual impairments, speech problems, and the feeling that your limbs do not belong to you. Hippocampal sparing appears to affect more men than women, and the disease tends to set in much earlier than traditional Alzheimer’s. Patients with hippocampal sparing also tend to deteriorate at a fast pace.

Misdiagnosis is common, as this subtype spares your memory. Quite often these patients end up being diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia or corticobasal syndrome10 instead. The former is associated with personality changes, while the latter is a progressive neurological disorder that can involve your motor system, cognition, or both, but patients typically present language problems first, followed by motor symptoms.

While the researchers believe that currently available Alzheimer’s medications may be more effective for those with hippocampal sparing Alzheimer’s than those with more traditional dementia, I firmly believe that drugs are not the answer to any of these conditions. Clearly, at the heart of it all is insulin and leptin resistance, fueled by a diet too high in refined sugars, processed fructose, and grains, combined with far too little healthful fats.


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Dr. Mercola and Dr. Perlmutter on Alzheimer’s Prevention (Full Interview)


Published on Sep 26, 2013… Natural health physician and founder Dr. Joseph Mercola interviews Dr. David Perlmutter on how to prevent Alzheimer’s disease.





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What Are Pomegranates Good For?


By Dr. Mercola

Pomegranates have been enjoyed for thousands of years and are a symbol of hope and abundance in many cultures. They’ve been found in Egyptian tombs, eaten by Babylonian soldiers prior to battle and incorporated into Persian wedding ceremonies to symbolize a joyous future.

It’s even been suggested that it was pomegranates, and not apples, that grew in the Garden of Eden. Pomegranate literally translates to “seeded apple,” but research shows pomegranates may pack even more nutritional punch.

Sometimes referred to as the Chinese apple or “jewel of the winter” (in North America, pomegranates are in season during early winter), pomegranates are one of the world’s most popular fruits.

In North America, they’re often overshadowed by more common fruits like apples and oranges, but once you learn how to eat them (it’s not as hard as you might think), this is one fruit that can add valuable nutrition, including antioxidants, to your regular diet.

Pomegranates Are an Antioxidant-Rich Superfood

The primary source of pomegranate’s benefits come from its antioxidant content, particularly ellagitannin compounds like punicalagins and punicalins, which account for about half of the pomegranate’s antioxidant ability. It’s also an excellent source of the antioxidant vitamin C, with one pomegranate providing about 40 percent of the daily requirement for this vitamin.1

In fact, according to a 2008 study, which compared the potency of 10 different polyphenol-rich beverages, pomegranate juice scored top billing as the most healthful of them all.2

Its potency was found to be at least 20 percent greater than any of the other beverages tested, beating out Concord grape juice, acai, and blueberry juice —three well-known sources of potent antioxidants. It beat them primarily because it contains the most of every type of antioxidant.

Pomegranates contain three types of antioxidant polyphenols, including tannins, anthocyanins, and ellagic acid, in significant amounts. Antioxidants are nature’s way of providing your cells with adequate defense against attack by reactive oxygen species (ROS).

As long as you have these important micronutrients, your body will be able to resist cellular damage and aging caused by your everyday exposure to pollutants.

If you don’t have an adequate supply of antioxidants to help neutralize free radicals, then you can be at risk of oxidative stress, which leads to accelerated tissue and organ damage. Antioxidants may also help to lower chronic inflammation in your body.

In his book The Antioxidants, Richard A. Passwater, PhD, says that humans have one of the longest natural lifespans in the animal kingdom, most likely because of the wealth of antioxidants in our omnivorous diet – including from eating whole foods like pomegranates.

Pomegranates May Have Anti-Cancer Properties

Pomegranate’s antioxidant activity is known to inhibit cell proliferation and invasion, and promote apoptosis (cell death) in various cancer cells.3 In one study, pomegranate extract was found to inhibit the growth of human breast cancer cells by inducing cell death.4 According to the University of Maryland Medical Center:5

“In test tubes, pomegranate extracts made from juice, rind, and oil slow down the reproduction of cancer cells and may hasten their death. Some extracts also help reduce blood supply to tumors, starving them and making them smaller. Most studies have focused on breast and prostate cancer cells. In one other study, pomegranate juice extract given to mice slowed down the growth of lung tumors. However, most of these studies have been in test tubes or in animals, not humans.”

At least one study in humans has yielded promising results, however. In men with prostate cancer, those who drank pomegranate juice significantly lengthened the time it took for their PSA levels to double (from about 15 months to 54 months).6 Men whose PSA levels double in a short time are at an increased risk of death from prostate cancer, so the results suggest that pomegranate had a powerfully protective effect.

Pomegranates May Reduce Arthritis Symptoms, Support Joint Health

Pomegranates or pomegranate extract may help reduce joint pain and decrease inflammation in arthritis sufferers, according to research published in the Israeli Medical Association Journal.7

The antioxidants in pomegranates may also help to reduce inflammation that contributes to the destruction of cartilage in your joints, a key reason for the pain and stiffness felt by many osteoarthritis sufferers. One study even found that pomegranate extract blocked the production of a cartilage-destroying enzyme.8 Researchers concluded:9


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