Category: Under Water Volcanoes


Could Dangerous Underwater Volcano in Caribbean Cause a US Tsunami?

PHOTO: View from "Hercules," a 5,000-pound submersible used by Robert Ballard and his team.
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A team of scientists is exploring the darkest corners of a huge underwater volcano in the Caribbean in hopes of better understanding the mysteries of earthquakes and tsunamis, ultimately saving lives.

Kick’em Jenny is a dangerous and active volcano sitting roughly 6,000 feet below the surface of the Caribbean Sea, and located off the coast of the island of Grenada, south of St. Lucia.

Robert Ballard, famous for discovering the Titanic 12,000 feet below the surface of the icy North Atlantic in 1985, set his sights on exploring the Kick’em Jenny to study its eruption history and learn more about how underwater volcanoes can pose a threat.

Ballard, the president of The Ocean Exploration Trust and the director of the Center for Ocean Exploration at the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography, said the Kick’em Jenny volcano has a history of explosive eruptions, which could have the potential to trigger tsunamis, the effects from which could be felt as far away as the northeastern United States.

 

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A Blast of a Find: 12 New Alaskan Volcanoes

Date: 31 May 2013 Time: 02:32 PM ET

Our-amazing-planet

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Behm Canal underwater volcano, Alaska
One of the newest volcanic vents discovered in Southeast Alaska is an underwater volcanic cone in Behm Canal near New Eddystone rock.
CREDIT: James Baichtal, U.S. Forest Service

In Alaska, scores of volcanoes and strange lava flows have escaped scrutiny for decades, shrouded by lush forests and hidden under bobbing coastlines.

In the past three years, 12 new volcanoes have been discovered in Southeast Alaska, and 25 known volcanic vents and lava flows re-evaluated, thanks to dogged work by geologists with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Forest Service. Sprinkled across hundreds of islands and fjords, most of the volcanic piles are tiny cones compared to the super-duper stratovolcanoes that parade off to the west, in the Aleutian Range.

But the Southeast’s volcanoes are in a class by themselves, the researchers found. A chemical signature in the lava flows links them to a massive volcanic field in Canada. Unusual patterns in the lava also point to eruptions under, over and alongside glaciers, which could help scientists pinpoint the size of Alaska’s mountain glaciers during past climate swings.

 

“It’s giving us this serendipitous window on the history of climate in Southeast Alaska for the last 1 million years,” said Susan Karl, a research geologist with the USGS in Anchorage and the project’s leader. [Image Gallery: Alaska's New Volcanoes]

Volcano forensics

The project kicked off in 2009 as part of an interdisciplinary effort to better understand volcanism in Southeast Alaska, Karl said.

The team’s first result, from a volcanic pile about 40 miles (70 kilometers) south of Mount Edgecumbe, was an intriguing match in time to the panhandle’s biggest volcano. The team planned to test if the two were related, sort of a geologic genetic test. But even though the two volcanoes had erupted at about the same time in the past, their chemistry was wildly different. It was like one volcano was a freshwater fish and the other came from the salty ocean. And what really captured the geologist’s attention were signs that the little volcano squeezed out lava that oozed next to glaciers.

“That’s when we realized we had a whole new kind of volcano separate from Mount Edgecumbe,” Karl told OurAmazingPlanet.

Lava chemistry holds forensic clues that reveal what was happening in Earth’s crust and mantle when the magma formed. The unusual chemistry sent Karl and her collaborators hunting for more rocks to test. This meant days-long backpacking trips into remote wilderness or submersible dives to underwater volcanoes.

New Alaska volcanoes in Behm Canal
Underwater volcanoes and cinder cones pockmark Behm Canal.
CREDIT: James Baichtal, U.S. Forest Service

Not only did they find the same unique chemical signature at other sites, the team stumbled upon new volcanoes overlooked by earlier mappers.

“We’re convinced now there’s probably a whole bunch of green knobs out there covered with timber that may be vents that may have never been mapped,” said James Baichtal, a geologist with the U.S. Forest Service based in Thorne Bay, Alaska, and a project leader.

Connection to Canada

Now comes the CSI twist. All of these newly tested lavas in Alaska are kissing cousins to volcanoes in Canada, such as Mount Edziza, which last erupted about 10,000 years ago.

The connection makes perfect sense, Karl said. “I’m actually surprised no one has hypothesized it before,” she said. “It made total sense that this volcanic province would extend across Southeast Alaska, and now I have the data to show that’s the case.”

Little known outside of Canada, Mount Edziza is part of the Northern Cordilleran Volcanic Province, a broad swath of volcanoes and hot springs some 1,250 miles (2,000 km) long and about 375 miles (600 km) wide.

Karl’s big picture meets approval with scientists studying Canada’s volcanoes.

“I knew there were volcanics to the west in Alaska, but I didn’t know they were nearly [this] extensive,” said Ben Edwards, a volcanologist at Dickinson College in Pennsylvania, who is not involved in the project but has visited the new volcanoes with Karl and Baichtal. “They have really found a lot more places than we realized, but there’s certainly no reason for them not to be there. It makes a lot of sense.”

 

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Veterans Today

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Mayan Calendar Guatamala Pyramid and End of Baktun13

By Harold Saive – Chemtrailsplanet.net

 

(3/27/2013) – The Mayan’s didn’t use their calendar to predict doom in 2012 but their 394 year Baktun cycle may predict a long period of low solar activity and years of extreme global cooling starting now.

Marking the end of the thirteenth Baktun on Dec 21, 2012 places the onset of solar events that led to the Maunder Minimum – also referred to as the “Little Ice Age”.

 

Are we ready yet for potentially disastrous impacts of space weather?

“Comparing a future solar event to the 1859 Carrington event: “Directly or indirectly, a comparable geomagnetic storm today (and foreseeable future) would likely include widespread and long-term disruptions on transportation and commerce, agriculture and food stocks, medical facilities, satellite-based communication and navigation systems, national security, etc.” — By Steve Trackton – The Capital Weather Gang – A review of the 2012 Space Weather Enterprise Forum presented by The National Space Weather Program Council.

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Are we ready yet for potentially disastrous impacts of space weather?

“Comparing a future solar event to the 1859 Carrington event: “Directly or indirectly, a comparable geomagnetic storm today (and foreseeable future) would likely include widespread and long-term disruptions on transportation and commerce, agriculture and food stocks, medical facilities, satellite-based communication and navigation systems, national security, etc.” — By Steve Trackton – The Capital Weather Gang – A review of the 2012 Space Weather Enterprise Forum presented by The National Space Weather Program Council.

Our Sun is Losing Energy: The typical peak-to-peak solar cycle have long been established to be about 11 years. The last solar minimum began in 2001 following an unremarkable maximum. But in April 2009 the solar minimum was officially recognized as having lasted far longer than normal. It was not until the middle of 2010 when sunspot numbers began to increase, signalling an overdue, but very weak return to a solar maximum. Relative to Earth, the maximum would be even weaker than forecast due a mysterious absence of earth-directed solar flares – a persistent event that continues to defy the label of “coincidence.”

The health of Earth’s atmosphere - extending out to the magnetosphere – relies on the energy of solar flares to maintain what we have come to expect as a “normal” electrical balance between Earth, Sun and the solar system. For unknown reasons, what little solar flare activity is taking place has been mostly directed away from Earth – causing our atmosphere to experience conditions not much different than an extended “minimum” – as if the solar maximum had not yet returned. If flares continues to miss earth for much longer, the return of the next solar minimum could delay a replenishing solar charge of our magnetosphere for years.

Changes in our Solar System:

  • Along with a decline in solar energy NASA has detected increased seismic activity on Mars
  • The rotation of Venus and possibly Saturn has measurably slowed.
  • Jupiter has exhibited significant weather changes including loss of a characteristic “stripe” as it gained a new red spot.
  • During 2012 telescopes recorded a giant flash on Jupiter that was larger than Earth. NASA called it a comet or asteroid but didn’t explain the telltale concentric rings and the absence of evidence that anything penetrated Jupiter’s atmosphere.
  • The 30 year cycle of Saturn Storms has broken stride to appear ten years earlier than predicted.
  • Hubble has been scanning space for years but only recently has been able to “see” auroras on Uranus.
  • In 2005 data from NASA’s Mars Global Surveyor and Odyssey missions revealed that the carbon dioxide “ice caps” near Mars’s south pole had been diminishing for three summers in a row.
  • Habibullo Abdussamatov, head of space research at St. Petersburg’s Pulkovo Astronomical Observatory in Russia, says the Mars melting ice caps data is evidence that the current global warming on Earth is being caused by changes in the sun.
  • Earthquakes are on the rise within our own moon.

 

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Earth Watch Report -  Volcanic Activity

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Today Unusual geological event Turkey Province of Mugla, [Unnamed underwater volcanoes] Damage level
Details

Unusual geological event in Turkey on Thursday, 20 December, 2012 at 12:11 (12:11 PM) UTC.

Description
There is a risk of volcanic eruption in Turkish province of Mugla close to ​​Marmaris, reported on Thursday. This was stated by scientists of Maltepe University. Some 12 scientists, carrying out research in the coastal Mediterranean area for several months found that there is a risk of an underwater volcano eruption as a result of numerous earthquakes in the area. A crater was also found at a depth of 25 metres under water. Turkey is located in a seismically active zone. The most powerful vibrations of the earth’s crust in this country occurred in the Marmara Sea in 1999. The magnitude of the tremors was 7.4. About 18,000 people were killed in the earthquake.

 

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