Category: Tsunami


Could Dangerous Underwater Volcano in Caribbean Cause a US Tsunami?

PHOTO: View from "Hercules," a 5,000-pound submersible used by Robert Ballard and his team.
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A team of scientists is exploring the darkest corners of a huge underwater volcano in the Caribbean in hopes of better understanding the mysteries of earthquakes and tsunamis, ultimately saving lives.

Kick’em Jenny is a dangerous and active volcano sitting roughly 6,000 feet below the surface of the Caribbean Sea, and located off the coast of the island of Grenada, south of St. Lucia.

Robert Ballard, famous for discovering the Titanic 12,000 feet below the surface of the icy North Atlantic in 1985, set his sights on exploring the Kick’em Jenny to study its eruption history and learn more about how underwater volcanoes can pose a threat.

Ballard, the president of The Ocean Exploration Trust and the director of the Center for Ocean Exploration at the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography, said the Kick’em Jenny volcano has a history of explosive eruptions, which could have the potential to trigger tsunamis, the effects from which could be felt as far away as the northeastern United States.

 

Read More Here

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Chile earthquake sparks tsunami warning and evacuation of thousands

Deaths reported and people on coast spending night in the hills after magnitude 8.2 undersea quake triggers emergency

Evacuation under way in Antofagasta, Chile, after an offshore earthquake triggered a tsunami alert and full-scale civil emergency.
Evacuation under way in Antofagasta, Chile, after an offshore earthquake triggered a tsunami alert. Photograph: Javiera Mora Araya/EPA

An earthquake of magnitude 8.2 has jolted northern Chile, triggering a tsunami alert and the evacuation of thousands of people from coastal areas. At least five people were killed and more than 300 women escaped from a coastal prison.

The quake was centred under the Pacific Ocean 61 miles north-west of the city of Iquique and struck at 8.46pm as thousands of residents were arriving home from work.

As sirens blared and emergency warnings urged residents to evacuate by foot to higher ground, in coastal cities traffic jams ensued as panicked residents sought to escape the coast. The first tsunami surge measured 2.5 metres (8.2ft) and flooded low-lying areas of Iquique including a medical clinic and bus terminal.

Chile shakemap
An image released by the US Geological Survey shows the location of a magnitude 8.0 earthquake off the coast of Chile 100km from the city of Iquique. Photograph: USGS/EPA

While thousands of residents sought refuge in the hills, an ad-hoc security force of police and members of the Chilean armed forces searched Iquique for the estimated 329 female prisoners thought to have escaped. Initial reports from Chilean investigative police said 16 prisoners had been apprehended. Firefighters, meanwhile, battled a huge blaze in central Iquique and the lack of water and electricity added to a sense of chaos.

In Santiago, a contingent of special forces police boarded a Hercules transport plane and were flown north to provide reinforcements and help prevent looting. In Iquique, police took control of service stations and provided perimeter security for supermarkets. Government officials said attempts to loot stores and abandoned homes in Iquique were rebuffed by police.

 

Read More Here

 

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Earthquake Off Chile’s Coast, Tsunami Warnings Issued

 

Published on Apr 2, 2014

More than 900,000 people evacuate Chile’s coastal areas after 8.2-magnitude quake.

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Chile earthquake: five dead as tsunami warning triggers coastal evacuation – live updates

  • Earthquake triggers tsunami warnings, mass evacuations
  • Five people are reported to have died in the aftermath
  • Authorities have called for ‘preventative evacuation’
Chile shakemap
A map by the US Geological Survey shows the location of a magnitude 8.2 earthquake off the coast of Chile, some 100km from the city of Iquique. Image: USGS/EPA

5.40pm AEST

Closing summary

We’re going to wrap up our live coverage of the earthquake and aftermath in Chile for the moment. Here’s a summary of how events unfolded today:

An 8.2 magnitude earthquake struck 60 kilometres northwest of the city of Iquique on Tuesday evening in Chile at 8:46pm, killing at least five people and allowing 300 prisoners to escape a nearby prison. Tremors have continued following the initial quake, and there have been more than 20 aftershocks in the region according to the United States Geological Survey.

A tsunami alert was issued for the Chilean coast and a precautionary evacuation was ordered. The tsunami warning has since been cancelled for Peru and Chile, although an advisory remains in place for Hawaii.

There are reports of some flooding in the streets of coastal areas but no damage from tsunami waves. The Chilean president has ordered a state of emergency for Arica, Parinacota and Tarapacá.

Updated at 5.44pm AEST

5.20pm AEST

My colleague Jonathan Franklin has just filed this update on events in Chile:

An 8.2 earthquake jolted Northern Chile killing at least 5 people and permitting more than 300 female inmates to escape a coastal prison. The quake, some 60 kilometres northwest of the city of Iquique, hit at 8:46pm as thousands of residents were arriving home from work.

As air raid sirens blared and emergency warnings urged residents to evacuate by foot to higher ground, in several coastal cities traffic jams ensued as panicked residents sought to escape the coast. The first tsunami surge measured 2.5 meters (8.2 feet) and flooded low lying areas of Iquique including a medical clinic and a bus terminal.

While thousands of residents sought refuge in the hills, an ad-hoc security force of police and members of the Chilean Armed Forces searched Iquique for the estimated 329 female prisoners thought to have escaped in the aftermath of the earthquake. Initial reports by Chilean investigative police PDI reported some 16 prisoners had been apprehended. Firefighters meanwhile battled a huge blaze in central Iquique and the lack of water and electricity added to a sense of chaos.

More to follow soon.

Updated at 5.41pm AEST

5.10pm AEST

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center has indicated in their latest release that a major Tsunami is not expected to strike Hawaii – but it should be stressed the tsunami advisory is still in place:

Based on all available data a major tsunami is not expected to strike the state of Hawaii. However…sea level changes and strong currents may occur along all coasts that could be a hazard to swimmers and boaters as well as to persons near the shore at beaches and in harbours and marinas. The threat may continue for several hours after the initial wave arrival.

Updated at 5.13pm AEST

5.06pm AEST

The latest update from the United States Geological Survey indicates there have been at least 25 after shocks following the initial 8.2 magnitude quake. The subsequent shocks range from 4.7 to 6.2 magnitude and are scattered in the same region off the Chilean coast.

Chile Earthquake
Data from the United States Geological Survey shows there have been repeated aftershocks in Chile. Photograph: /United States Geological Survey

4.39pm AEST

Here’s a little background on the state of emergency declared by Chilean president Michelle Bachelet from Jonathan in Chile:

Under Chilean law the state of emergency provision signed by President Bachelet allows members of the armed forces to patrol the streets and assist with law enforcement.

For many Chileans, the sight of military troops on the streets rekindle ugly memories of the Pinochet dictatorship in which thousands were killed and many more systematically tortured by security forces. But because of looting during earlier national emergencies – notably the 2010 earthquake in Southern Chile city of Concepcion – Chilean authorities, including socialist president Michelle Bachelet, are not shy about bolstering public security in moments of national disaster.

4.36pm AEST

Aftershocks and further earthquakes are continuing. There have been more than 10 aftershocks since the initial 8.2 magnitude quake.

In the last few hours low and medium sized earthquakes have struck Arica, Parinacota, Tarapaca and Antofagasta.

4.33pm AEST

With the coastal regions of Chile evacuated, tens, possibly hundreds of thousands of people have fled to higher ground.

Tsunami warning sirens were set off when a magnitude 8.2 earthquake hit at a depth of approximately 10km off the Pacific coast of the north of Chile. In videos taken shortly after the alert, people could be seen fleeing through the streets and climbing to hilltops.

4.14pm AEST

View of a large fire in the historical center of Iquique, Chile, 01 April 2014, after a 8.2 Richter scale earthquake hit in the Pacific Ocean, triggering a Tsunami, in the North of Chile.
View of a large fire in the historical center of Iquique, Chile, 01 April 2014, after a 8.2 Richter scale earthquake hit in the Pacific Ocean, triggering a Tsunami, in the North of Chile. Photograph: ALEX VALDES/EPA
An elderly person is evacuated from a shelter after a tsunami alarm at Antofagasta city, north of Santiago on the southern Pacific coast, April 1, 2014.
An elderly person is evacuated from a shelter after a tsunami alarm at Antofagasta city, north of Santiago on the southern Pacific coast, April 1, 2014. Photograph: STRINGER/REUTERS

3.59pm AEST

Tsunami warning cancelled for Peru, Chile

The Pacific Tsunami Warning centre has cancelled the tsunami warnings for Peru and Chile.

“Sea level readings indicate a tsunami was generated,” said the statement. “It may have been destructive along coasts near the earthquake epicentre.”

A tsunami advisory remains in place for Hawaii.

3.56pm AEST

There have been 11 hospitals evacuated due to floods, but all others are operating normally, National Director of ONEMI, Ricardo Toro said. The evacuated hospitals are: Mussels, Chañaral, Guasco, Taltal Toltén, Corral, Queilén, Achao, Balmaceda, Swans and Puerto Chacabuco.

3.45pm AEST

The Chilean president has declared a state of emergency for Arica and Parinacota and Tarapacá, reports CNN.

There has been some flooding in the streets of coastal areas, but no damage from the tsunami waves which reportedly reached more than 2m in some areas.

3.35pm AEST

Tsunami advisory issued for Hawaii

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center has issued a tsunami advisory for Hawaii.

“Based on all available data, a major tsunami is not expected to strike the state of Hawaii,” it said.

“However, sea level changes and strong currents may occur along all coasts that could be a hazard to swimmers and boaters as well as to persons near the shore at beaches and in harbours and marinas.”

The first wave generated by the earthquake is expected to reach Hawaii at 3:24 a.m. There is already a tsunami warning in place for Chile and Peru.

3.25pm AEST

Ricardo Toro, head of the ONEMI national emergency services agency, has confirmed to media the entire Chilean coastline has been evacuated.

3.19pm AEST

The Chilean minister of the interior has confirmed the five deaths to media. Peñailillo also said 11 coastal hospitals have been evacuated for fears of tsunami and a planeload of prison guards and riot police is en route to Iquique.

3.17pm AEST

Omeni has confirmed some roads have been cut by landslides in Arica, Tarapaca, San Marcos and by floods in Coquimbo. Drinking water has been “preemptively” stopped in Arica.

3.12pm AEST

Reports: five dead in earthquake

CNN is reporting five people have been reported dead in the aftermath of the earthquake. Two reported earlier are believed to have died from heart attacks.

 

 

Follow Complete Updates  Here

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Earth Watch Report  -  Tsunami

Aftermath  on a Brazilian beach after  a Meteorological Tsunami strikes

Cassino 09.02.2014

Pablo Guimarães

 

Published on Feb 9, 2014

Onda invade praia do Cassino e arrasta carros.

(Wave invades Cassino Beach and drags cars)

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February 12 2014 04:37 AM Tsunami Brazil Rio Grande do Sul, [Praia do Cassino (Casino Beach)] Damage level Details

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Tsunami in Brazil on Wednesday, 12 February, 2014 at 04:37 (04:37 AM) UTC.

Description
Sunbathers, swimmers and casual visitors at the world’s longest beach, the Praia do Cassino (literally Casino Beach) in Rio Grande, Brazil, were captured by surprise this past Sunday when a bizarre natural phenomenon known as a Meteorological Tsunami, Meteotsunami or simply, weather-induced tsunami, hit the area. It caused the sea to swell and spill out a wave that reached all the way up to the parking spots (…or at least where people had parked their rides, possibly too close to the beach), and while humans escaped unscathed, their belongings, including dozens of vehicles, were damaged, as the body of water tossed the cars around on the sand. According to locals, this isn’t the first time that such a tsunami has been observed in the area. Meteorological tsunami (meteotsunami) “Tsunami-like phenomena generated by meteorological or atmospheric disturbances. These waves can be produced by atmospheric gravity waves, pressure jumps, frontal passages, squalls, gales, typhoons, hurricanes and other atmospheric sources.” “Meteotsunamis have the same temporal and spatial scales as tsunami waves and can similarly devastate coastal areas, especially in bays and inlets with strong ampli?cation and well-de?ned resonant properties.”

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Freaky Meteotsunami Tosses Parked Cars Around at Brazilian Beach

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Sunbathers, swimmers and casual visitors at the world’s longest beach, the Praia do Cassino (literally Casino Beach) in Rio Grande, Brazil, were captured by surprise this past Sunday when a bizarre natural phenomenon known as a Meteorological Tsunami, Meteotsunami or simply, weather-induced tsunami, hit the area. It caused the sea to swell and spill out a wave that reached all the way up to the parking spots (…or at least where people had parked their rides, possibly too close to the beach), and while humans escaped unscathed, their belongings, including dozens of vehicles, were damaged, as the body of water tossed the cars around on the sand. According to locals, this isn’t the first time that such a tsunami has been observed in the area.

Read More and Watch Videos Here

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Earth Watch Report

Russia  -  6.6 Mag EQ  November 12th  2013 photo Russia-66MagEQNovember12th2013_zpsf0430164.jpg
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M 6.6 – 172km S of Ust’-Kamchatsk Staryy, Russia

 2013-11-12 07:03:51 UTC

Earthquake location 54.681°N, 162.286°E

Event Time

  1. 2013-11-12 07:03:51 UTC
  2. 2013-11-12 19:03:51 UTC+12:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-11-12 01:03:51 UTC-06:00 system time

Location

54.681°N 162.286°E depth=47.2km (29.3mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 172km (107mi) S of Ust’-Kamchatsk Staryy, Russia
  2. 300km (186mi) NE of Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy, Russia
  3. 305km (190mi) NE of Yelizovo, Russia
  4. 321km (199mi) NE of Vilyuchinsk, Russia
  5. 2733km (1698mi) NNE of Tokyo, Japan

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Tectonic Summary

Seismotectonics of the Kuril-Kamchatka Arc

The Kuril-Kamchatka arc extends approximately 2,100 km from Hokkaido, Japan, along the Kuril Islands and the Pacific coast of the Kamchatka Peninsula to its intersection with the Aleutian arc near the Commander Islands, Russia. It marks the region where the Pacific plate subducts into the mantle beneath the Okhotsk microplate, part of the larger North America plate. This subduction is responsible for the generation of the Kuril Islands chain, active volcanoes located along the entire arc, and the deep offshore Kuril-Kamchatka trench. Relative to a fixed North America plate, the Pacific plate is moving towards the northwest at a rate that increases from 75 mm/year near the northern end of the arc to 83 mm/year in the south.

Plate motion is predominantly convergent along the Kuril-Kamchatka arc with obliquity increasing towards the southern section of the arc. The subducting Pacific plate is relatively old, particularly adjacent to Kamchatka where its age is greater than 100 Ma. Consequently, the Wadati-Benioff zone is well defined to depths of approximately 650 km. The central section of the arc is comprised of an oceanic island arc system, which differs from the continental arc systems of the northern and southern sections. Oblique convergence in the southern Kuril arc results in the partitioning of stresses into both trench-normal thrust earthquakes and trench-parallel strike-slip earthquakes, and the westward translation of the Kuril forearc. This westward migration of the Kuril forearc currently results in collision between the Kuril arc in the north and the Japan arc in the south, resulting in the deformation and uplift of the Hidaka Mountains in central Hokkaido.

The Kuril-Kamchatka arc is considered one of the most seismically active regions in the world. Deformation of the overriding North America plate generates shallow crustal earthquakes, whereas slip at the subduction zone interface between the Pacific and North America plates generates interplate earthquakes that extend from near the base of the trench to depths of 40 to 60 km. At greater depths, Kuril-Kamchatka arc earthquakes occur within the subducting Pacific plate and can reach depths of approximately 650 km.

This region has frequently experienced large (M>7) earthquakes over the past century. Since 1900, seven great earthquakes (M8.3 or larger) have also occurred along the arc, with mechanisms that include interplate thrust faulting, and intraplate faulting. Damaging tsunamis followed several of the large interplate megathrust earthquakes. These events include the February 3, 1923 M8.4 Kamchatka, the November 6,1958 M8.4 Etorofu, and the September 25, 2003 M8.3 Hokkaido earthquakes. A large M8.5 megathrust earthquake occurred on October 13, 1963 off the coast of Urup, an island along the southern Kuril arc, which generated a large tsunami in the Pacific Ocean and the Sea of Okhotsk, and caused run-up wave heights of up to 4-5 m along the Kuril arc. The largest megathrust earthquake to occur along the entire Kurile-Kamchatka arc in the 20th century was the November 4, 1952 M9.0 event. This earthquake was followed by a devastating tsunami with run-up wave heights as high as 12 m along the coast of Paramushir, a small island immediately south of Kamchatka, causing significant damage to the city of Severo-Kurilsk.

On October 4,1994, a large (M8.3) intraplate event occurred within the subducted oceanic lithosphere off the coast of Shikotan Island causing intense ground shaking, landslides, and a tsunami with run-up heights of up to 10 m on the island.

The most recent megathrust earthquake in the region was the November 15, 2006 M8.3 Kuril Island event, located in the central section of the arc. Prior to this rupture, this part of the subduction zone had been recognized as a seismic gap spanning from the northeastern end of the 1963 rupture zone to the southwestern end of the 1952 rupture. Two months after the 2006 event, a great (M8.1) normal faulting earthquake occurred on January 13, 2007 in the adjacent outer rise region of the Pacific plate. It has been suggested that the 2007 event may have been caused by the stresses generated from the 2006 earthquake.

More information on regional seismicity and tectonics

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Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

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Russia  -  6.6 Mag EQ  November 12th  2013 photo Russia-66MagEQNovember12th2013_zps3b70ceaf.jpg

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MissingSky101 MissingSky101

 

Published on Oct 26, 2013

More than 2.5 years have passed since the Great East Japan Earthquake. Now, more and more people are returning to live in areas that were inundated by tsunami waves. This program takes a look at what should be done to protect these communities in the future.

Japan Meteorological Agency
http://www.jma.go.jp/en/quake/quake_l…

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Earth Watch Report  -  Earthquakes

Philippines  -  7.1 mag EQ  October 14th  2013 photo Philippines-71magEQOctober14th2013_zps68e2a016.jpg

 

3 earthquakes in map area

  1. M 4.8 – Off the east coast of Honshu, Japan

    2013-10-25 14:02:58 UTC-05:00 17.0 km

  2. M 5.1 – Off the east coast of Honshu, Japan

    2013-10-25 12:57:39 UTC-05:00 36.9 km

  3. M 7.1 – Off the east coast of Honshu, Japan

    2013-10-25 12:10:16 UTC-05:00 10.0 km

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M 7.1 – Off the east coast of Honshu, Japan

2013-10-25 17:10:16 UTC

 

Earthquake location 37.170°N, 144.665°E

Event Time

  1. 2013-10-25 17:10:16 UTC
  2. 2013-10-26 03:10:16 UTC+10:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-10-25 12:10:16 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

37.170°N 144.665°E depth=10.0km (6.2mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 326km (203mi) E of Namie, Japan
  2. 327km (203mi) ESE of Ishinomaki, Japan
  3. 333km (207mi) SE of Ofunato, Japan
  4. 334km (208mi) ESE of Yamoto, Japan
  5. 475km (295mi) ENE of Tokyo, Japan

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Tectonic Summary

The October 25, 2013 M 7.1 earthquake offshore of Honshu, Japan occurred as the result of normal faulting in the shallow oceanic crust of the Pacific plate. The earthquake occurred outboard (east) of the Japan Trench, which marks the seafloor expression of the subduction zone plate boundary between the Pacific and North America plates, and is immediately up-dip of the source region of the March 2011 M 9.0 Tohoku earthquake. At the latitude of this earthquake, the Pacific plate moves westwards with respect to the North America plate at a rate of 83 mm/yr before subducting beneath the island of Honshu. Note that some authors divide this region into several microplates that together define the relative motions between the larger Pacific, North America and Eurasia plates; these include the Okhotsk and Amur microplates that are respectively part of North America and Eurasia.

The location, depth, and focal mechanism of the October 25 2013 event are consistent with normal faulting rupture near the outer-arc high of the Japan Trench. In this region, normal faulting is encouraged by both the bending of the Pacific plate as it enters the subduction zone, and by stresses transferred from the locked subduction thrust interface to the west. Since the March 2011 Tohoku earthquake, two large events of M 7.7 and M 7.3 have occurred in the vicinity of the October 25, 2013 earthquake. The M 7.7 event, on March 11, 2011, was also a normal faulting event near the outer-arc high and occurred 95 km north of the October 25 event. The M 7.3 event, on December 7, 2012, was a more complex earthquake resulting from thrust motion near the trench 100 km to the northwest of the October 25 earthquake. Since March 2011, 10 additional events, ranging in magnitude from M 6.1-6.4, have occurred in this region east of the Japan Trench.

Seismotectonics of Japan and Vicinity

Japan and the surrounding islands straddle four major tectonic plates: Pacific plate; North America plate; Eurasia plate; and Philippine Sea plate. The Pacific plate is subducted into the mantle, beneath Hokkaido and northern Honshu, along the eastern margin of the Okhotsk microplate, a proposed subdivision of the North America plate. Farther south, the Pacific plate is subducted beneath volcanic islands along the eastern margin of the Philippine Sea plate. This 2,200 km-long zone of subduction of the Pacific plate is responsible for the creation of the deep offshore Ogasawara and Japan trenches as well as parallel chains of islands and volcanoes, typical of Circumpacific island arcs. Similarly, the Philippine Sea plate is itself subducting under the Eurasia plate along a zone, extending from Taiwan to southern Honshu that comprises the Ryukyu Islands and the Nansei-Shoto trench.

Subduction zones at the Japanese island arcs are geologically complex and produce numerous earthquakes from multiple sources. Deformation of the overriding plates generates shallow crustal earthquakes, whereas slip at the interface of the plates generates interplate earthquakes that extend from near the base of the trench to depths of 40 to 60 km. At greater depths, Japanese arc earthquakes occur within the subducting Pacific and Philippine Sea plates and can reach depths of nearly 700 km. Since 1900, three great earthquakes occurred off Japan and three north of Hokkaido. They are the M8.4 1933 Sanriku-oki earthquake, the M8.3 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake, the M9.0 2011 Tohoku earthquake, the M8.4 1958 Etorofu earthquake, the M8.5 1963 Kuril earthquake, and the M8.3 1994 Shikotan earthquake.

More information on regional seismicity and tectonics

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Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

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Philippines - 7.1 mag EQ October 14th 2013 photo Japan-71MagEQOctober25th2013_zps2e67a300.jpg
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***ALERT BREAKING NEWS*** 6.8 MAG QUAKE STRIKES OFF FUKUSHIMA TSUNAMI WARNINGS IN EFFECT

MissingSky101 MissingSky101·

Published on Oct 25, 2013

Tsunami warnings in effect.
Very breaking news.
Earthquake Information (Information on seismic intensity at each site)
Issued at 02:28 JST 26 Oct 2013

Occurred at (JST) Latitude
(degree) Longitude
(degree) Depth Magnitude Region Name
02:10 JST 26 Oct 2013 37.2N 144.6E 10 km 6.8 Fukushima-ken Oki

Follow NHK for updates
http://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/index….

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***Fukushima Earthquake Update*** Revised Magnitude 7.1 Tsunami Expected To Hit Fukushima

MissingSky101 MissingSky101·

Published on Oct 25, 2013

AP: 7.3-magnitude quake rocks Japan — Fukushima tsunami warning triggered — Tepco orders workers near coast to move to higher ground
http://enenews.com/ap-7-3-magnitude-q…

Earthquake Information (Information on seismic intensity at each site)
Issued at 03:13 JST 26 Oct 2013

Occurred at (JST) Latitude
(degree) Longitude
(degree) Depth Magnitude Region Name
02:10 JST 26 Oct 2013 37.2N 144.6E 10 km 7.1 Fukushima-ken Oki

http://www.jma.go.jp/en/quake/quake_l…

http://www.jma.go.jp/en/tsunami/

http://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/w/movie/

Tepco live Web Can
http://mfile.akamai.com/127380/live/r…

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Japan Tsunami Warnings Have Been Cancelled Issued at 04:05 JST 26 Oct 2013

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Earth Watch Report  -  Earthquakes

Globe with Earthquake Location

7.0 – COLOMBIA

Preliminary Earthquake Report
Magnitude 7.0
Date-Time
  • 9 Feb 2013 14:16:06 UTC
  • 9 Feb 2013 09:16:06 near epicenter
  • 9 Feb 2013 08:16:06 standard time in your timezone
Location 1.143N 77.362W
Depth 129 km
Distances
  • 11 km (7 miles) SW (235 degrees) of Pasto, Colombia
  • 168 km (104 miles) SSW (210 degrees) of Popayan, Colombia
  • 173 km (108 miles) ESE (116 degrees) of Tumaco, Colombia
  • 199 km (123 miles) NE (40 degrees) of QUITO, Ecuador
Location Uncertainty Horizontal: 14.6 km; Vertical 8.6 km
Parameters Nph = 499; Dmin = 157.1 km; Rmss = 0.90 seconds; Gp = 50°
Version = 8
Event ID us c000f4ij

For updates, maps, and technical information, see:
Event Page
or
USGS Earthquake Hazards Program

National Earthquake Information Center
U.S. Geological Survey
http://earthquake.usgs.gov/regional/neic/

6.9 deep quake hits Colombia, no injuries reported

Associated Press – 1 hr 52 mins ago

Yahoo News

BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — A powerful but deep earthquake shook a broad swath of Colombia and Ecuador on Saturday, sending frightened people fleeing into the streets, but no serious injuries or major damage were reported.

The U.S. Geological Survey said the 9:16 a.m. (14:16 GMT) quake had a magnitude of 6.9.It was centered about 7 miles (12 kilometers) from the Colombian town of Pasto and 92 miles (154 kilometers) below the surface.

The quake was felt in the Colombian capital of Bogota, some 340 miles (545 kilometers) to the northeast, and across much of neighboring Ecuador.

In the province of Narino, where the quake hit, secretary of government Jaime Rodriguez said officials had reports of three people hurt when roof tiles fell in the town of El Charco along the Pacific Coast. Officials in Ecuador also reported no significant damage.

Colombian television showed people fleeing into the streets of southwestern cities such as Cali, and small cracks in the walls of some buildings.

Mayor Paulo Cesar Rodriguez of the town of Tuquerres near the epicenter said the quake was “very strong and felt for a long time” but that there were no reports of injuries in the town of 42,300.

  Tsunami Information
Pacific Ocean Region
Date/Time (UTC) Message Location Magnitude Depth Status Details
09.02.2013 14:24 PM Tsunami Information Bulletin Colombia 6.9 130 km Details

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Tsunami Information Bulletin in Colombia, Pacific Ocean

000
WEPA42 PHEB 091424
TIBPAC

TSUNAMI BULLETIN NUMBER 001
PACIFIC TSUNAMI WARNING CENTER/NOAA/NWS
ISSUED AT 1424Z 09 FEB 2013

THIS BULLETIN APPLIES TO AREAS WITHIN AND BORDERING THE PACIFIC
OCEAN AND ADJACENT SEAS...EXCEPT ALASKA...BRITISH COLUMBIA...
WASHINGTON...OREGON AND CALIFORNIA.

... TSUNAMI INFORMATION BULLETIN ...

THIS BULLETIN IS FOR INFORMATION ONLY.

THIS BULLETIN IS ISSUED AS ADVICE TO GOVERNMENT AGENCIES.  ONLY
NATIONAL AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT AGENCIES HAVE THE AUTHORITY TO MAKE
DECISIONS REGARDING THE OFFICIAL STATE OF ALERT IN THEIR AREA AND
ANY ACTIONS TO BE TAKEN IN RESPONSE.

AN EARTHQUAKE HAS OCCURRED WITH THESE PRELIMINARY PARAMETERS

 ORIGIN TIME -  1416Z 09 FEB 2013
 COORDINATES -   1.1 NORTH   77.3 WEST
 DEPTH       -  130 KM
 LOCATION    -  COLOMBIA
 MAGNITUDE   -  6.9

EVALUATION

 A DESTRUCTIVE TSUNAMI WAS NOT GENERATED BASED ON EARTHQUAKE AND
 HISTORICAL TSUNAMI DATA.

THIS WILL BE THE ONLY BULLETIN ISSUED FOR THIS EVENT UNLESS
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION BECOMES AVAILABLE.

THE WEST COAST/ALASKA TSUNAMI WARNING CENTER WILL ISSUE PRODUCTS
FOR ALASKA...BRITISH COLUMBIA...WASHINGTON...OREGON...CALIFORNIA.

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Earth Watch Report  -  Tsunami

Solomons children flee

Solomon Islands school children flee to higher ground after the tsunami warning. Image: Twitter @ bencmcnair

 

3 07.02.2013 Tsunami Solomon Islands [Santa Cruz Island coastal area] Damage level
Details

Tsunami in Solomon Islands on Wednesday, 06 February, 2013 at 05:28 (05:28 AM) UTC.

Description
A powerful earthquake off the Solomon Islands generated a tsunami of up to 1.5 meters (about 5 feet) that damaged dozens of homes in the South Pacific island chain Wednesday, but authorities canceled warnings for tsunamis on more distant coasts. There were no initial reports of deaths or injuries. Solomons officials reported two 1.5-meter (4 foot, 11-inch) waves hit the western side of Santa Cruz Island, damaging around 50 homes and properties, said George Herming, a spokesman for the prime minister. Many villagers had headed to higher ground as a precaution, Herming said. The tsunami formed after an 8.0-magnitude earthquake struck near Lata on Santa Cruz in Temotu province, the easternmost province of the Solomons, about a 3-hour flight from the capital, Honiara. The region has a population of around 30,000 people. In Honiara, the warnings had prompted residents to flee for higher ground. “People are still standing on the hills outside of Honiara just looking out over the water, trying to observe if there is a wave coming in,” Herming said. So far, he had received no reports that a wave had been spotted in Honiara. Atenia Tahu, who works for the Solomon Islands Broadcasting Corp. in Honiara, said most people were remaining calm. “People around the coast and in the capital are ringing in and trying to get information from us and the National Disaster Office and are slowly moving up to higher ground,” Tahu said. “But panic? No, no, no, people are not panicking.”

Tsunami in Solomon Islands on Wednesday, 06 February, 2013 at 05:28 (05:28 AM) UTC.

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Updated: Wednesday, 06 February, 2013 at 10:50 UTC
Description
A tsunami has struck the eastern Solomon Islands after a powerful earthquake that briefly triggered warnings for several South Pacific nations. The magnitude 8.0 quake near the Santa Cruz Islands is reported to have destroyed at least three villages. Officials in the Solomon Islands say there may be casualties. The U.S. Geological Survey says a tsunami measuring 0.9 meters hit the town of Lata in the Santa Cruz Island chain in the eastern part of the Solomon Islands. Officials say the wave swept half a kilometer inland, destroying homes and sending panicked residents fleeing to higher ground. Solomon Islands Police Commissioner John Lansley says authorities are trying to establish how much damage the tsunami has caused. “We believe that three, possibly four villages have been affected,” said Lansley. “The severity we are not clear about and I do not want to speculate, but we are doing our utmost to establish a little bit more information about the effects of the surge wave. We also are not clear on casualties, although we believe there may be casualties.”

Tsunami in Solomon Islands on Wednesday, 06 February, 2013 at 05:28 (05:28 AM) UTC.

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Updated: Wednesday, 06 February, 2013 at 12:39 UTC
Description
A powerful 8.0 magnitude earthquake set off a tsunami that killed at least five people in a remote part of the Solomon Islands on Wednesday and triggered evacuations across the South Pacific as island nations issued tsunami alerts. The quake struck 340 km (211 miles) east of Kira Kira in the Solomons, the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center in Hawaii said as it issued warnings for the Solomons and other South Pacific nations including Australia and New Zealand. It later canceled the warnings for the outlying regions. A tsunami measuring 0.9 metres (three feet) hit near the town of Lata on the remote Santa Cruz island, swamping some villages and the town’s main airport as people fled to safety on higher ground.

More than three dozen aftershocks up to magnitude 6.6 rocked the region in the hours after the quake, the U.S. Geological Survey said. Lata hospital’s director of nursing, Augustine Pilve, told New Zealand television that five people had been killed, including a boy about 10 years old, adding that more casualties were possible as officials made their way to at least three villages that may have been hit. “It’s more likely that other villages along the coast of Santa Cruz may be affected,” he said. Disaster officials in the Solomon Islands capital Honiara told the Solomon Islands Broadcasting Corp. that they believed six people were dead and that five villages had suffered damage. Solomon Islands Police Commissioner John Lansley said it was too early to fully assess the damage or casualty numbers, and said authorities hoped to send aircraft to the region on Thursday to help determine the extent of the damage. Luke Taula, a fisheries officer in Lata, said he watched the tsunami as it came in small tidal surges rather than as one large wave. “We have small waves come in, then go out again, then come back in. The waves have reached the airport terminal,” he told Reuters by telephone. The worst damage was to villages on the western side of a point that protects the main township, he said.

Tsunami in Solomon Islands on Wednesday, 06 February, 2013 at 05:28 (05:28 AM) UTC.

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Updated: Thursday, 07 February, 2013 at 03:41 UTC
Description
Six bodies, including a child’s, have been found in the sodden wreckage left by a tsunami that smashed into villages in the Solomon Islands, flattening dozens of homes in the South Pacific island chain. The 1.5-meter (4 foot, 11-inch) waves that roared inland on Santa Cruz Island, in the eastern Solomons, on Wednesday were too fast to outrun for five elderly villagers and one child, who died after being sucked under the rushing water, George Herming, a spokesman for the prime minister, said Thursday. Several other people were still missing and dozens of strong aftershocks were keeping frightened villagers from returning to the coast, Herming said. “People are still scared of going back to their homes because there’s nothing left, so they are residing in temporary shelters on higher ground,” Herming said.

The tsunami was generated by a powerful 8.0-magnitude earthquake that struck near the town of Lata, on Santa Cruz in Temotu, the easternmost province in the Solomons. Temotu has a population of around 30,000. Smaller waves were recorded in Vanuatu and New Caledonia. The damage appeared to be concentrated to the west side of Santa Cruz, with five villages wiped out, Herming said. Authorities were still struggling to reach the remote area but an estimated 100 homes had been damaged or destroyed, he said. The tsunami flooded the airstrip at the nearest airport and left it littered with debris, preventing relief workers from reaching the region by air. Smaller islands may also have sustained some damage, but workers had also not yet reached those areas, Herming said.

Earth Watch Report  -  Tsunami

2 Today Tsunami Solomon Islands [Santa Cruz Island coastal area] Damage level
Details

Tsunami in Solomon Islands on Wednesday, 06 February, 2013 at 05:28 (05:28 AM) UTC.

Description
A powerful earthquake off the Solomon Islands generated a tsunami of up to 1.5 meters (about 5 feet) that damaged dozens of homes in the South Pacific island chain Wednesday, but authorities canceled warnings for tsunamis on more distant coasts. There were no initial reports of deaths or injuries. Solomons officials reported two 1.5-meter (4 foot, 11-inch) waves hit the western side of Santa Cruz Island, damaging around 50 homes and properties, said George Herming, a spokesman for the prime minister. Many villagers had headed to higher ground as a precaution, Herming said. The tsunami formed after an 8.0-magnitude earthquake struck near Lata on Santa Cruz in Temotu province, the easternmost province of the Solomons, about a 3-hour flight from the capital, Honiara. The region has a population of around 30,000 people. In Honiara, the warnings had prompted residents to flee for higher ground. “People are still standing on the hills outside of Honiara just looking out over the water, trying to observe if there is a wave coming in,” Herming said. So far, he had received no reports that a wave had been spotted in Honiara. Atenia Tahu, who works for the Solomon Islands Broadcasting Corp. in Honiara, said most people were remaining calm. “People around the coast and in the capital are ringing in and trying to get information from us and the National Disaster Office and are slowly moving up to higher ground,” Tahu said. “But panic? No, no, no, people are not panicking.”

Tsunami in Solomon Islands on Wednesday, 06 February, 2013 at 05:28 (05:28 AM) UTC.

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Updated: Wednesday, 06 February, 2013 at 12:39 UTC
Description
A powerful 8.0 magnitude earthquake set off a tsunami that killed at least five people in a remote part of the Solomon Islands on Wednesday and triggered evacuations across the South Pacific as island nations issued tsunami alerts. The quake struck 340 km (211 miles) east of Kira Kira in the Solomons, the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center in Hawaii said as it issued warnings for the Solomons and other South Pacific nations including Australia and New Zealand. It later canceled the warnings for the outlying regions. A tsunami measuring 0.9 metres (three feet) hit near the town of Lata on the remote Santa Cruz island, swamping some villages and the town’s main airport as people fled to safety on higher ground.

More than three dozen aftershocks up to magnitude 6.6 rocked the region in the hours after the quake, the U.S. Geological Survey said. Lata hospital’s director of nursing, Augustine Pilve, told New Zealand television that five people had been killed, including a boy about 10 years old, adding that more casualties were possible as officials made their way to at least three villages that may have been hit. “It’s more likely that other villages along the coast of Santa Cruz may be affected,” he said. Disaster officials in the Solomon Islands capital Honiara told the Solomon Islands Broadcasting Corp. that they believed six people were dead and that five villages had suffered damage. Solomon Islands Police Commissioner John Lansley said it was too early to fully assess the damage or casualty numbers, and said authorities hoped to send aircraft to the region on Thursday to help determine the extent of the damage. Luke Taula, a fisheries officer in Lata, said he watched the tsunami as it came in small tidal surges rather than as one large wave. “We have small waves come in, then go out again, then come back in. The waves have reached the airport terminal,” he told Reuters by telephone. The worst damage was to villages on the western side of a point that protects the main township, he said.

Today Tsunami New Caledonia North Province, Hienghene Damage level
Details

Tsunami in New Caledonia on Wednesday, 06 February, 2013 at 04:04 (04:04 AM) UTC.

Description
Tsunami wave has been observed in Hienghene, North Province, New Caledonia following the M 8.0 earthquake. The observed tsunami wave height was 55 centimetres (1.8 feet). Other information not available yet.

Today Tsunami New Caledonia Loyalty Islands, Lifou Damage level
Details

Tsunami in New Caledonia on Wednesday, 06 February, 2013 at 04:02 (04:02 AM) UTC.

Description
Tsunami wave has been observed in Luganville, Sanma Province, New Caledonia following the M 8.0 earthquake. The observed tsunami wave height was 48 centimetres (1.6 feet). Other information not available yet.

1 Today Tsunami Vanuatu Sanma Province, Luganville Damage level
Details

Tsunami in Vanuatu on Wednesday, 06 February, 2013 at 03:42 (03:42 AM) UTC.

Description
Tsunami wave has been observed in Luganville, Sanma Province, Vanatu following the M 8.0 earthquake. The observed tsunami wave height was 11 centimetres (0.4 feet). Other information not available yet.

Tsunami in Vanuatu on Wednesday, 06 February, 2013 at 03:42 (03:42 AM) UTC.

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Updated: Wednesday, 06 February, 2013 at 05:31 UTC
Description
An official at the disaster management office in Vanuatu said there were no reports of damage or injuries there.

Today Tsunami American Samoa [Lata Wharf] Damage level
Details

Tsunami in American Samoa on Wednesday, 06 February, 2013 at 03:38 (03:38 AM) UTC.

Description
Tsunami wave has been observed in Lata Wharf, Samoa following the M 8.0 earthquake. The observed tsunami wave height was 90 centimetres (3 feet). Other information not available yet.

Expanding Regional Tsunami Warning Cancellation in Santa Cruz Islands, Pacific Ocean

GuID: pacific.TSUPAC.2013.02.06.0347
Date/Time: 2013-02-06 03:47:19
Source: PTWC
Area: Pacific Ocean
Location: Santa Cruz Islands
Magnitude: M 8
Depth: 33 km
Tsunami observed: Yes, tsunami wave has been observed.

Mayan calendar - photo/picture definition - Mayan calendar word and phrase image

Forget the Mayan calendar. Now, please, worry about volcanos.

Houston Chronicle

Or the world could end on Dec. 31, when my office calendar runs out.

Note: The calendar pictured is Aztec, not Mayan, as a couple of totally obnoxoid people have pointed out. Somebody should tell Google.

Something really bad will happen at some point. Of that much we can be sure. When, what and how are the variables. One writer went and talked to some experts about what we should be worried about and what we can do about it.

Here’s what the volcano guy said:

“The threat posed by volcanoes worldwide is greatly underestimated,” he tells me. Today, he says, we ignore the fact that very large eruptions occur from time to time. It gets worse when he adds, “This size of eruption may occur on average somewhere on Earth every 200 to 500 years. It will occur again.” And then it gets much worse: “This is by no means the largest, however.” He says we can expect eruptions 10 to 20 times as powerful as the Tambora eruption, which killed 117,000 people. That eruption led to the Year Without a Summer, in 1816, otherwise known as Eighteen-Hundred-and-Froze-to-Death. Since the new eruption Sigurdsson is predicting could be 20 times worse than that, winter really is coming.

By the way, when did professor emeritus become emeritus professor?

Other things we should worry about: asteroids, pandemics, earthquakes, tsunamis. But the writer points out that the real disaster is not being knowledgeable and not being prepared.

Not that I’m ruling out the Mayan thing.

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