Category: meteors


All Sky Fireball Network

 

Every night, a network of NASA all-sky cameras scans the skies above the United States for meteoritic fireballs. Automated software maintained by NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office calculates their orbits, velocity, penetration depth in Earth’s atmosphere and many other characteristics. Daily results are presented here on Spaceweather.com.

On May. 20, 2014, the network reported 8 fireballs.
(8 sporadics)

In this diagram of the inner solar system, all of the fireball orbits intersect at a single point–Earth. The orbits are color-coded by velocity, from slow (red) to fast (blue). [Larger image] [movies]

Near Earth Asteroids

 

Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) are space rocks larger than approximately 100m that can come closer to Earth than 0.05 AU. None of the known PHAs is on a collision course with our planet, although astronomers are finding new ones all the time.

 

On May 21, 2014 there were 1475 potentially hazardous asteroids.

 

Recent & Upcoming Earth-asteroid encounters:

Notes: LD means “Lunar Distance.” 1 LD = 384,401 km, the distance between Earth and the Moon. 1 LD also equals 0.00256 AU. MAG is the visual magnitude of the asteroid on the date of closest approach.

Asteroid
Date(UT)
Miss Distance
Size
2010 JO33
May 17
4 LD
43 m
2014 KD
May 19
7.7 LD
57 m
2014 KD2
May 20
5.2 LD
41 m
2005 UK1
May 20
36.7 LD
1.1 km
1997 WS22
May 21
47.1 LD
1.5 km
2002 JC
May 24
48.7 LD
1.4 km
2014 HQ124
Jun 8
3.3 LD
620 m
2011 PU1
Jul 18
7.6 LD
43 m

…..

Notes: LD means “Lunar Distance.” 1 LD = 384,401 km, the distance between Earth and the Moon. 1 LD also equals 0.00256 AU. MAG is the visual magnitude of the asteroid on the date of closest approach.

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METEOR SHOWER ALERT:

Next weekend, Earth will pass through a stream of debris from Comet 209P/LINEAR. The encounter could spark a new meteor shower. Forecasters aren’t sure how many meteors will appear; anything is possible from a complete dud to a magnificent meteor storm. Best estimates fall between 30 and 200 meteors per hour on May 24th between 0600 UT and 0800 UT on May 24th. Get the full story from Science@NASA

 

ScienceCasts: NASA on the Lookout for a New Meteor Shower

A first-of-its-kind meteor shower is expected to occur Friday night and into early Saturday morning.

The Camelopardalid meteor shower is a first because Earth has never run into the debris from this particular comet.

The Comet 209P/LINEAR is a very dim comet that orbits the sun every five years and was discovered in 2004.

MORE: New meteor shower could turn into meteor storm

Unlike other meteor showers expected to be visible around the same time of year, the Camelopardalid is unique because its debris is strongly influenced by Jupiter’s gravity, which constantly alters the orbit of this comet’s debris, said William Cooke, head of the Meteoroid Environment Office at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center.

 

 

Read More Here

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Space Weather

by Dr. Tony Phillips.

All Sky Fireball Network

 

Every night, a network of NASA all-sky cameras scans the skies above the United States for meteoritic fireballs. Automated software maintained by NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office calculates their orbits, velocity, penetration depth in Earth’s atmosphere and many other characteristics. Daily results are presented here on Spaceweather.com.

On May. 11, 2014, the network reported 9 fireballs.
(7 sporadics, 2 eta Aquariids)

In this diagram of the inner solar system, all of the fireball orbits intersect at a single point–Earth. The orbits are color-coded by velocity, from slow (red) to fast (blue). [Larger image] [movies]

Near Earth Asteroids

Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) are space rocks larger than approximately 100m that can come closer to Earth than 0.05 AU. None of the known PHAs is on a collision course with our planet, although astronomers are finding new ones all the time.

On May 14, 2014 there were 1473 potentially hazardous asteroids.

Recent & Upcoming Earth-asteroid encounters:

Asteroid
Date(UT)
Miss Distance
Size
2014 HT178
May 8
5.9 LD
21 m
2014 JD
May 9
7.7 LD
24 m
2014 JG55
May 10
0.3 LD
7 m
2014 JW55
May 13
4.3 LD
23 m
2014 JH15
May 17
8 LD
59 m
2010 JO33
May 17
4 LD
43 m
2005 UK1
May 20
36.7 LD
1.1 km
1997 WS22
May 21
47.1 LD
1.5 km
2002 JC
May 24
48.7 LD
1.4 km
2014 HQ124
Jun 8
3.2 LD
615 m

Notes: LD means “Lunar Distance.” 1 LD = 384,401 km, the distance between Earth and the Moon. 1 LD also equals 0.00256 AU. MAG is the visual magnitude of the asteroid on the date of closest approach.

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Space Weather.com

by Dr. Tony Phillips.

All Sky Fireball Network

Every night, a network of NASA all-sky cameras scans the skies above the United States for meteoritic fireballs. Automated software maintained by NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office calculates their orbits, velocity, penetration depth in Earth’s atmosphere and many other characteristics. Daily results are presented here on Spaceweather.com.

On Apr. 25, 2014, the network reported 9 fireballs.
(9 sporadics)

In this diagram of the inner solar system, all of the fireball orbits intersect at a single point–Earth. The orbits are color-coded by velocity, from slow (red) to fast (blue). [Larger image] [movies]

On Apr. 24, 2014, the network reported 19 fireballs.
(15 sporadics, 4 April Lyrids)

In this diagram of the inner solar system, all of the fireball orbits intersect at a single point–Earth. The orbits are color-coded by velocity, from slow (red) to fast (blue). [Larger image] [movies]

Near Earth Asteroids

Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) are space rocks larger than approximately 100m that can come closer to Earth than 0.05 AU. None of the known PHAs is on a collision course with our planet, although astronomers are finding new ones all the time.

On April 26, 2014 there were 1466 potentially hazardous asteroids.

Recent & Upcoming Earth-asteroid encounters:

Asteroid
Date(UT)
Miss Distance
Size
2014 GG49
Apr 19
3.9 LD
31 m
2014 HP2
Apr 24
3.8 LD
15 m
2014 HU2
Apr 25
3.7 LD
22 m
2014 HM4
Apr 25
1.6 LD
18 m
2014 HW
Apr 27
2.1 LD
10 m
2007 HB15
Apr 28
6.7 LD
12 m
2014 HL2
Apr 28
8.8 LD
26 m
2014 HV2
Apr 29
1.4 LD
33 m
2010 JO33
May 17
4 LD
43 m
2005 UK1
May 20
36.7 LD
1.1 km
1997 WS22
May 21
47.1 LD
1.5 km
2002 JC
May 24
48.7 LD
1.4 km

Notes: LD means “Lunar Distance.” 1 LD = 384,401 km, the distance between Earth and the Moon. 1 LD also equals 0.00256 AU. MAG is the visual magnitude of the asteroid on the date of closest approach.

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March 31, 2014

Organic Ejecta –Clues to Violent Events in the History of the Universe

 

Pinwheel_Spitzer

 

Exploding stars, random impacts involving comets and meteorites, and even near misses between two bodies can create regions of great heat and high pressure. Researchers from Imperial College London have now developed a method for analysing the pressure experienced by tiny samples of organic material that may have been ejected from dying stars before making a long journey through the cosmos. The researchers have investigated a type of aromatic hydrocarbon called dimethylnaphthalene, which should enable them to identify violent events in the history of the universe.

The team also believe that their new technique could be applied on Mars, potentially using the existing technology on-board roving laboratories such as the one on the Mars Science Laboratory Mission to glean information about sources of organic matter on the red planet. Recognising the pressures recorded in the aromatic hydrocarbons can help to reveal whether it came from processes generated from ancient living organisms.Samples of dimethylnaphthalene are found in meteorites. Previously, scientists have only had the ability to investigate how they have been affected by heat. The Imperial researchers say their method for detecting periods when dimethylnaphthalenes have experienced high pressure will now allow for a much more comprehensive analysis of organic materials.

 

Read More Here

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Earth Watch Report  –  Space

Image Source  NASA

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RSOE EDIS

 Earth approaching objects (objects that are known in the next 30 days)

 

Object Name Apporach Date Left AU Distance LD Distance Estimated Diameter* Relative Velocity
(2012 RJ15) 11th March 2014 0 day(s) 0.1119 43.5 51 m – 110 m 13.72 km/s 49392 km/h
(2002 SZ) 11th March 2014 0 day(s) 0.1059 41.2 220 m – 490 m 19.28 km/s 69408 km/h
(2012 RJ15) 11th March 2014 0 day(s) 0.1119 43.5 51 m – 110 m 13.72 km/s 49392 km/h
(2002 SZ) 11th March 2014 0 day(s) 0.1059 41.2 220 m – 490 m 19.28 km/s 69408 km/h
(2001 SQ3) 11th March 2014 0 day(s) 0.1871 72.8 130 m – 280 m 18.26 km/s 65736 km/h
(2013 UX2) 12th March 2014 1 day(s) 0.1482 57.7 3.8 m – 8.6 m 2.94 km/s 10584 km/h
(2010 FR9) 14th March 2014 3 day(s) 0.1210 47.1 16 m – 36 m 10.80 km/s 38880 km/h
(2014 AY28) 16th March 2014 5 day(s) 0.0429 16.7 120 m – 270 m 5.37 km/s 19332 km/h
(2005 FN) 17th March 2014 6 day(s) 0.0812 31.6 11 m – 25 m 8.09 km/s 29124 km/h
(2012 XB112) 17th March 2014 6 day(s) 0.1175 45.7 2.5 m 4.02 km/s 14471.999999999998 km/h
(2013 WT44) 17th March 2014 6 day(s) 0.0327 12.7 320 m – 710 m 11.13 km/s 40068 km/h
(2004 YC) 19th March 2014 8 day(s) 0.1054 41.0 20 m – 45 m 9.35 km/s 33660 km/h
(2003 YX1) 20th March 2014 9 day(s) 0.1654 64.4 180 m – 390 m 11.76 km/s 42336 km/h
322756 (2001 CK32) 20th March 2014 9 day(s) 0.1465 57.0 440 m – 990 m 9.06 km/s 32616 km/h
(2011 HH) 20th March 2014 9 day(s) 0.1016 39.5 23 m – 52 m 5.04 km/s 18144 km/h
(2012 FK15) 21st March 2014 10 day(s) 0.1495 58.2 13 m – 30 m 13.66 km/s 49176 km/h
(2003 HT42) 22nd March 2014 11 day(s) 0.0942 36.6 29 m – 65 m 7.54 km/s 27144 km/h
325102 (2008 EY5) 23rd March 2014 12 day(s) 0.0789 30.7 250 m – 570 m 12.89 km/s 46404 km/h
(2013 GW68) 24th March 2014 13 day(s) 0.1950 75.9 110 m – 240 m 16.74 km/s 60263.99999999999 km/h
(2011 EN40) 24th March 2014 13 day(s) 0.1662 64.7 220 m – 490 m 27.82 km/s 100152 km/h
(2013 FD8) 25th March 2014 14 day(s) 0.0851 33.1 19 m – 43 m 11.55 km/s 41580 km/h
143649 (2003 QQ47) 25th March 2014 14 day(s) 0.1283 49.9 880 m – 2.0 km 32.41 km/s 116675.99999999999 km/h
(2012 FM35) 27th March 2014 16 day(s) 0.1916 74.6 9.2 m – 21 m 8.84 km/s 31824 km/h
(2011 FT53) 27th March 2014 16 day(s) 0.1007 39.2 23 m – 52 m 12.36 km/s 44496 km/h
(2012 EA) 29th March 2014 18 day(s) 0.0356 13.9 11 m – 25 m 6.00 km/s 21600 km/h
(2009 FW25) 29th March 2014 18 day(s) 0.0715 27.8 56 m – 120 m 12.34 km/s 44424 km/h
(2009 FD) 31st March 2014 20 day(s) 0.1009 39.3 100 m – 230 m 12.89 km/s 46404 km/h
(2009 SA100) 31st March 2014 20 day(s) 0.0445 17.3 44 m – 99 m 7.99 km/s 28764 km/h
(2010 GD35) 31st March 2014 20 day(s) 0.0489 19.0 33 m – 75 m 11.07 km/s 39852 km/h
(2009 CT) 31st March 2014 20 day(s) 0.1984 77.2 320 m – 710 m 13.35 km/s 48060 km/h
243566 (1995 SA) 01st April 2014 21 day(s) 0.1879 73.1 970 m – 2.2 km 14.22 km/s 51192 km/h
(2001 QC34) 01st April 2014 21 day(s) 0.1082 42.1 250 m – 570 m 4.78 km/s 17208 km/h
(2013 TT5) 03rd April 2014 23 day(s) 0.0959 37.3 15 m – 33 m 4.04 km/s 14544 km/h
86878 (2000 HD24) 03rd April 2014 23 day(s) 0.1084 42.2 800 m – 1.8 km 20.44 km/s 73584 km/h
(2010 GC35) 06th April 2014 26 day(s) 0.0677 26.3 31 m – 68 m 4.59 km/s 16524 km/h
(2008 OC6) 07th April 2014 27 day(s) 0.1949 75.8 530 m – 1.2 km 14.34 km/s 51624 km/h
330659 (2008 GG2) 09th April 2014 29 day(s) 0.1450 56.4 77 m – 170 m 7.16 km/s 25776 km/h
1 AU = ~150 million kilometers,1 LD = Lunar Distance = ~384,000 kilometers Source: NASA-NEO

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Space Weather

by Dr. Tony Phillips.

 All Sky Fireball Network

Every night, a network of NASA all-sky cameras scans the skies above the United States for meteoritic fireballs. Automated software maintained by NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office calculates their orbits, velocity, penetration depth in Earth’s atmosphere and many other characteristics. Daily results are presented here on Spaceweather.com.

On Mar. 10, 2014, the network reported 3 fireballs.
(3 sporadics)

In this diagram of the inner solar system, all of the fireball orbits intersect at a single point–Earth. The orbits are color-coded by velocity, from slow (red) to fast (blue). [Larger image] [movies]

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Earth Watch Report  –  Space

Image Source  NASA

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  Earth approaching objects (objects that are known in the next 30 days)

Object Name Apporach Date Left AU Distance LD Distance Estimated Diameter* Relative Velocity
(2013 BZ45) 02nd February 2014 1 day(s) 0.0688 26.8 110 m – 250 m 8.98 km/s 32328 km/h
(2009 CG) 04th February 2014 3 day(s) 0.1311 51.0 70 m – 160 m 12.93 km/s 46548 km/h
(2011 MW1) 05th February 2014 4 day(s) 0.1017 39.6 92 m – 210 m 11.06 km/s 39816 km/h
348306 (2005 AY28) 06th February 2014 5 day(s) 0.0394 15.3 130 m – 300 m 17.06 km/s 61415.99999999999 km/h
(2004 AS1) 08th February 2014 7 day(s) 0.1286 50.0 210 m – 470 m 12.85 km/s 46260 km/h
(2006 DP14) 09th February 2014 8 day(s) 0.0160 6.2 460 m – 1.0 km 27.13 km/s 97668 km/h
(2013 BS45) 10th February 2014 9 day(s) 0.0317 12.3 18 m – 39 m 3.76 km/s 13536 km/h
(2007 BG) 13th February 2014 12 day(s) 0.1476 57.5 330 m – 750 m 7.99 km/s 28764 km/h
(2008 BP16) 16th February 2014 15 day(s) 0.1672 65.1 120 m – 270 m 19.78 km/s 71208 km/h
(2000 EM26) 17th February 2014 16 day(s) 0.0227 8.8 120 m – 270 m 12.37 km/s 44532 km/h
85953 (1999 FK21) 17th February 2014 16 day(s) 0.1910 74.3 590 m 24.29 km/s 87444 km/h
(1999 SK10) 20th February 2014 19 day(s) 0.1838 71.5 320 m – 710 m 11.48 km/s 41328 km/h
(2012 DY43) 20th February 2014 19 day(s) 0.0403 15.7 67 m – 150 m 19.41 km/s 69876 km/h
(2001 EB18) 21st February 2014 20 day(s) 0.1161 45.2 370 m – 820 m 26.33 km/s 94788 km/h
(2006 DS14) 22nd February 2014 21 day(s) 0.1644 64.0 220 m – 490 m 14.41 km/s 51876 km/h
(2009 EC1) 25th February 2014 24 day(s) 0.1246 48.5 73 m – 160 m 8.07 km/s 29052 km/h
(2013 TN127) 01st March 2014 28 day(s) 0.1930 75.1 15 m – 34 m 8.18 km/s 29448 km/h
(2006 FV) 01st March 2014 28 day(s) 0.1145 44.5 64 m – 140 m 6.19 km/s 22284 km/h
1 AU = ~150 million kilometers,1 LD = Lunar Distance = ~384,000 kilometers Source: NASA-NEO

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BPEarthWatch BPEarthWatch

Published on Jan 11, 2014

Solar,Quake,Volcano and Weather Links http://www.BpearthWatch.Com
http://www.amsmeteors.org/fireball_ev…
http://lunarmeteoritehunters.blogspot…

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Space Weather

All Sky Fireball Network

by Dr. Tony Phillips.

 

Every night, a network of NASA all-sky cameras scans the skies above the United States for meteoritic fireballs. Automated software maintained by NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office calculates their orbits, velocity, penetration depth in Earth’s atmosphere and many other characteristics. Daily results are presented here on Spaceweather.com.

On Jan. 11, 2014, the network reported 14 fireballs.
(14 sporadics)

In this diagram of the inner solar system, all of the fireball orbits intersect at a single point–Earth. The orbits are color-coded by velocity, from slow (red) to fast (blue). [Larger image] [movies]

 

Near Earth Asteroids

Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) are space rocks larger than approximately 100m that can come closer to Earth than 0.05 AU. None of the known PHAs is on a collision course with our planet, although astronomers are finding new ones all the time.

On January 12, 2014 there were 1450 potentially hazardous asteroids.

Recent & Upcoming Earth-asteroid encounters:

Asteroid
Date(UT)
Miss Distance
Size
2014 AD16
Jan 8
1.5 LD
15 m
2014 AE29
Jan 9
4.1 LD
15 m
2014 AW32
Jan 10
0.5 LD
15 m
2014 AZ32
Jan 11
6.2 LD
28 m
2007 SJ
Jan 21
18.9 LD
1.9 km
2012 BX34
Jan 28
9.6 LD
13 m
2006 DP14
Feb 10
6.2 LD
730 m
2000 EM26
Feb 18
8.8 LD
195 m
2000 EE14
Mar 6
64.6 LD
1.8 km
2003 QQ47
Mar 26
49.9 LD
1.4 km

Notes: LD means “Lunar Distance.” 1 LD = 384,401 km, the distance between Earth and the Moon. 1 LD also equals 0.00256 AU. MAG is the visual magnitude of the asteroid on the date of closest approach.

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DAHBOO77

 

Published on Dec 30, 2013

This is the latest imaging on Comet Ison, Or , What is left of it! As we can see , it looks like we have a massive debris trail following where Ison Should Have Been !

http://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/co…

https://secure.flickr.com/photos/hiro…

https://twitter.com/SungrazerComets/s…

 

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Jan. 16 May Be Last Best Chance to Search for Comet ISON’s Remains

by Bob King on December 30, 2013

Want to stay on top of all the space news? Follow @universetoday on Twitter

Comet ISON revolves around the sun in steeply inclined orbit. Earth will pass through the plane of that orbit on Jan. 16. As we look "up" toward the comet our edgewise perspective could cause a temporary brightening of ISON's dust remnant. Credit: solarsystemscope.com with annotations by the writer.

Comet ISON revolves around the sun in steeply inclined orbit. Earth will pass through the plane of that orbit on Jan. 16. As we look “up” toward the comet, ISON’s dust stacks up along our line of sight and could appear temporarily brighter. Credit: solarsystemscope.com with annotations and additions by Bob King

Is there any hope of detecting what’s left of Comet ISON after the sun proved too much for its delicate constitution? German amateur astronomer Uwe Pilz suggest there remains a possibility that a photographic search might turn up a vestige of the comet when Earth crosses its orbital plane on January 16, 2014.

Comet ISON is located high in the northern sky near the familiar "W" or "M" or Cassiopeia during the time of orbital crossing. Stellarium

Comet ISON is located high in the northern sky near the familiar “W” or “M” or Cassiopeia during the time of orbital crossing. Stellarium

On and around that date, we’ll be staring straight across the sheet of debris left in the comet’s path. Whatever bits of dust and grit it left behind will be “visually compressed” and perhaps detectable in time exposure photos using wide-field telescopes. To understand why ISON would appear brighter, consider the bright band of the Milky Way. It stands apart from the helter-skelter scatter of stars for the same reason; when we look in its direction, we peer into the galaxy’s flattened disk where the stars are most concentrated. They stack up to create a brighter band slicing across the sky. Similarly, dust shed by Comet ISON will be “stacked up” from Earth’s perspective on the 16th.

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Spaceweather.com

by Dr. Tony Phillips.

GEMINID METEOR SHOWER–IT’S UNDERWAY:

  This sharp uptick in activity signals the official beginning of the 2013 Geminid meteor shower. For the next 3 to 4 days, Earth will pass through a stream of debris from rock comet 3200 Phaethon, producing dozens of meteors per hour flying out of the contellation Gemini. “There is a nice show going on right now,” says Bill Cooke, head of NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office.

The multiple cameras of NASA’s fireball network are able to measure the orbits of Geminid meteoroids. This plot shows the orbits of the 39 fireballs recorded so far this week:

Earth is the blue dot where all the orbits intersect. The purple curve shows the path of Geminid parent 3200 Phaethon.

Forecasters expect the shower to peak on Dec. 13-14 when Earth passes through the busiest part of Phaethon’s debris stream. Peak rates could reach 120 meteors per hour. However, glare from the nearly-full Moon could reduce the number of visible meteors 2- to 3-fold. Cooke advises looking during the hours just before local sunrise on Saturday, Dec. 14th. “At that time, the Moon will be below the horizon, improving your chances of seeing the show.”

You can listen to radar echoes from the Geminids, unaffected by moonlight, on Space Weather Radio. Also, tune into NASA’s live web chat about the Geminids on Friday the 13th beginning at 11 pm EST.

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Geminid meteor shower will light up Friday night sky

Geminid meteor photographed over Steamboat Springs, Colo., on Dec. 12, 2010 Jimmy Westlak

More than 100 meteors will rocket across the sky on the night of Dec. 13 and early morning hours of the 14th. Visible from almost any point on Earth, it’s the peak of the annual Geminid meteor shower.

The most intense meteor shower of the year, the Geminid features between 100 and 120 meteors per hour at its peak, traveling about 78,000 miles per hour. The full shower lasts from Dec. 12-16.

“The Geminids are my favorite because they defy explanation,” said Bill Cooke, lead for NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office, in a press release. “Of all the debris streams Earth passes through every year, the Geminids are by far the most massive. When we add up the amount of dust in the Geminid stream, it outweighs other streams by factors of 5 to 500.”

While most meteor showers are a collection of meteorids spewed from comets, the Geminid meteor shower features fragments and dusty debris of a “weird rocky object named 3200 Phaethon,” according to NASA.

 

Read More Here
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