Category: Epidemic Hazards


Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

File:Cholera bacteria SEM.jpg

Scanning electron microscope image of Vibrio cholerae bacteria, which infect the digestive system.

Zeiss DSM 962 SEM

T.J. Kirn, M.J. Lafferty, C.M.P Sandoe and R.K. Taylor, 2000, “Delineation of pilin domains required for bacterial association into microcolonies and intestinal colonization”, Molecular Microbiology, Vol. 35(4):896-910

Ronald Taylor, Tom Kirn, Louisa Howard

Source: http://remf.dartmouth.edu/images/bacteriaSEM/source/1.html

Wikimedia.org

 

…..

Biological Hazard Nepal Central Region, Rautahat Damage level Details

 

…..

RSOE EDIS

Biological Hazard in Nepal on Thursday, 15 May, 2014 at 17:58 (05:58 PM) UTC.

Description
Sample test of stool of patients thought to be suffering from diarrhea in Rautahat district has confirmed the disease to be deadly cholera instead. After the District Health Office failed to do anything about the fast spreading problem in the region, a special team of doctors had been deployed to identify the illness. National Public Health Laboratory has confirmed the disease as cholera. People had started to fall sick with the symptoms of diarrhea since the past four weeks in Gaidatar village of Rautahat. A team of four doctors led by Dr Pranil Man Singh Pradhan had taken stool sample of the patients three weeks ago, result of which was revealed on Thursday. The team was deployed by the Epidemiology and Disease Control Division and Patan Health- Science Academy. According to Dr Subash Chaudhary of the District Health Office, doctors had taken stool of seven people for sample test. “It has been confirmed that that was not diarrhea but cholera,” he said. In the village, 435 people have been complaining about gastroenteritis complications over the recent weeks. Govinda Timilsina, operator of a local ‘Timilsina Clinic’ in Rautahat said that the disease in spreading fast despite efforts made to control it. “Ten new patients were added only on Thursday,” he said. On Thursday, Maya Bal, Kajiman Waiba and Rakesh Kachhadiya, among others were given saline drip and few have been provided with medicine, Timilsina informed. Last time, cholera was detected in the village five years ago, and it has claimed life of two and affected over hundred people. Locals are enraged that the government has not taken it much seriously even when over 400 people have already been affected this time. Moreover, a government team led by Duryadhan Chandra Banshi, which was sent out for inspection of the situation has earlier reported that the disease is already coming under control. According to Chaudhary, contaminated drinking water is the foremost reason for the spread of the deadly disease. “The drying up of rivers and destruction of Chure ecosystem have contributed to the pollution and unhealthy environment,” he added.
Biohazard name: Cholera Outbreak
Biohazard level: 2/4 Medium
Biohazard desc.: Bacteria and viruses that cause only mild disease to humans, or are difficult to contract via aerosol in a lab setting, such as hepatitis A, B, and C, influenza A, Lyme disease, salmonella, mumps, measles, scrapie, dengue fever, and HIV. “Routine diagnostic work with clinical specimens can be done safely at Biosafety Level 2, using Biosafety Level 2 practices and procedures. Research work (including co-cultivation, virus replication studies, or manipulations involving concentrated virus) can be done in a BSL-2 (P2) facility, using BSL-3 practices and procedures. Virus production activities, including virus concentrations, require a BSL-3 (P3) facility and use of BSL-3 practices and procedures”, see Recommended Biosafety Levels for Infectious Agents.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

 

…..

 

Cholera Claims one life in Rautahat, dozens affected

Diarrhoea claims one in Rautahat

THT Online/File

In this file photo a diarrhoea patient is undergoing treatment at Chandranigahapur Hospital, Rautahat.

PRABHAT KUMAR JHA

 

RAUTAHAT: Diarrhea claimed life of a child at Gaidatar VDC here on Sunday.

The deceased has been identified as Mohisang Maya Sitan. Mohisang who was suffering from diarrhea died as she could not get proper medical treatment, her family members said.

 

Read More Here

…..

 

 

…..

 

Enhanced by Zemanta
About these ads

The Daily Star

Saudi Arabia reports five new MERS deaths

May 18, 2014 09:19 AM Agence France Presse

Particles of the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus that emerged in 2012 are seen in an undated colorized transmission electron micrograph from the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID).  REUTERS/National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases/Handout via Reuters

Particles of the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus that emerged in 2012 are seen in an undated colorized transmission electron micrograph from the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). REUTERS/National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases/Handout via Reuters

 

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia has reported five new deaths from the MERS respiratory virus, bringing the death toll in the world’s worst-hit country to 168.

In its latest tally, issued Saturday, the Health Ministry said the total number of infections in the kingdom from the coronavirus since it first appeared in 2012 now stood at 529 people.

Among the latest fatalities were two men aged 67 and 55 and an 80-year-old woman in Jeddah, the port city where a spate of cases among staff at King Fahd Hospital last month led to the dismissal of its director and the health minister.

In addition, a 71-year-old man and another aged 77 died in Riyadh and Medina respectively, the ministry website reported.

 

Read More Here

…..

Al Jazeera

Saudi Arabia records more MERS deaths

Three more people die from coronavirus, days after an emergency WHO committee called on countries to improve prevention.

Last updated: 17 May 2014 10:16
Listen to this page using ReadSpeaker

The World Health Organisation called for better prevention measures [AFP]

Health authorities in Saudi Arabia have reported three more fatalities from the MERS respiratory virus, taking the death toll in the world’s worst-hit country to 163.

The health ministry website also revealed on Saturday that 520 cases have been recorded in the country since MERS appeared in Saudi Arabia in 2012.

It said three women died on Friday; a 48-year-old in Riyadh, a 67-year-old in Taif, and woman in Jeddah whose age was not disclosed.

A spate of cases among staff at King Fahd Hospital in Jeddah last month sparked public panic and the dismissal of its director and the health minister.

Other nations including Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, the Netherlands, the UAE and the US have also recorded cases, mostly in people who had been to Saudi Arabia.

On Wednesday, the World Health Organisation said its emergency committee, which includes global medical and policy experts, had flagged mounting concerns about the potentially fatal virus.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

File:MERS coronavirus.jpg

Transmission electron micrograph of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus.

National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Wikimedia .org

…..

Biological Hazard United Kingdom Capital City, London [Heathrow Airport] Damage level Details

 

…..

RSOE EDIS

Biological Hazard in United Kingdom on Tuesday, 13 May, 2014 at 12:10 (12:10 PM) UTC.

Description
A second passenger who travelled through Heathrow Airport been diagnosed with a potentially fatal Sars-style virus. The latest case of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, MERS-CoV, involves a person flying from Jeddah to America via London. The passenger, who travelled on Saudi Airlines flight 113 on Thursday, May 1, tested positive for the virus after arriving in the US. It follows a similar case involving a passenger who travelled from Riyadh to Chicago and transferred in London on Thursday, April 24. Checks on other passengers on the flight have proved negative, according to Public Health England. Tourists travelling to the Middle East, especially those with chronic medical conditions, are being urged to avoid contact with camels as experts believe they may help to transmit the virus. PHE say the incubation period is around 14 days, but stress the risk of transmission is extremely low. The new type of coronavirus was first identified in a Middle Eastern patient in 2012. According to World Health Organisation figures, 111 people have tested positive in the Jeddah area of Saudi Arabia in the last two years – resulting in 31 deaths. Worldwide the number of cases is thought to be 401, with 93 fatalities. Three people have died in the UK as a result of the infection. PHE said the last case to be detected was in February 2013. Other cases have also been reported in France, Germany, Italy and Greece, across the Middle East in Egypt, Jordan, Qatar, Kuwait and Oman and in other countries such as Malaysia, Philippines and Tunisia. Professor Nick Phin, head of respiratory diseases for Public Health England, said: “As with the incident earlier this month, the risk is very low. “We will be following up with any UK passengers who were sitting in the vicinity of the passenger with MERS-CoV, as a precautionary measure. “Any UK-based travellers who become unwell with a fever, cough or shortness of breath within 14 days of being in the Middle East, should make sure they call their doctor and tell them where they have travelled. “Although the source of MERS-CoV is unknown, there is growing evidence of the possible role of camels in transmitting it to humans. “We advise travellers, particularly those with underlying or chronic medical conditions, to avoid contact with camels in the Middle East. “All travellers should practise good hand and respiratory hygiene to reduce the risk of respiratory illness.”
Biohazard name: MERS-COv (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS))
Biohazard level: 4/4 Hazardous
Biohazard desc.: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, H5N1(bird flu), Dengue hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic or unidentified diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 (P4) lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

 

…..

Second MERS case detected in passenger flying through London

The deadly MERS virus has been diagnosed in two air passengers passed through London in transit in a matter of weeks

A worker wears a mask next to camels in Saudi Arabia.

A worker wears a mask next to camels in Saudi Arabia. There is growing evidence of the possible role of camels in transmitting MERS-CoV to humans Photo: AFP/GETTY

A second case of the deadly MERS virus has been diagnosed on a flight through London.

The passenger was flying from Jeddah to the USA and transiting through Heathrow exactly one week after a person flying from Riyadh to Chicago who stopped at the London airport was found to have the new deadly respiratory virus that has spread through the Middle East.

The risk to anyone on the Saudi Airlines flight 113 on May 1 is thought to be low, but Public Health England warn anyone who has have since become unwell or experienced respiratory symptoms, such as shortness of breath, to seek medical advice.

No other passenger on the April 24 British Airways flight 262 from Riyadh to London was found to have contracted Middle East Respiratory Syndrome.

Experts say the risk to fellow travellers is low as although the mortality rate from the disease is high, it is not easily spread between humans.

 

Read More Here

…..

 

 

…..

Enhanced by Zemanta

File:MERS-CoV electron micrograph3.jpg

MERS-CoV particles as seen by negative stain electron microscopy. Virions contain characteristic club-like projections emanating from the viral membrane.

By  :  Cynthia Goldsmith/Maureen Metcalfe/Azaibi Tamin

http://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/mers/photos.htm

Wikimedia . org


U.S. reports third case of MERS virus

English.news.cn   2014-05-18 07:15:58

 

WASHINGTON, May 17 (Xinhua) — A third case of the deadly Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) virus infection has been found in the United States, the country’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said Saturday.

The patient is an Illinois man who had close contact with the country’s first confirmed case of MERS virus infection in Indiana and “probably got the virus from the Indiana patient,” the CDC said in a statement.

The Illinois resident “did not seek or require medical care” and “is reported to be feeling well” at this time but as part of the MERS virus infection follow-up investigation of the first case, local health officials have monitored his health daily since May 3, the CDC said.

It said that the Illinois resident, who has no recent history of travel outside the United States, met with the Indiana patient on two occasions shortly before the latter was identified as having had MERS virus infection.

The Illinois man tested positive for the MERS virus Friday night, the CDC added.

The first U.S. MERS case is a U.S. resident who had traveled back from Saudi Arabia and was admitted to an Indiana hospital on April 28. He was confirmed to have MERS virus infection on May 2, and has since been released from the hospital.

A second U.S. imported case of MERS virus infection was confirmed on May 11 on a 44-year-old man who also came to the U.S. from Saudi Arabia. This patient is currently hospitalized in Florida and doing well, the CDC said.

The MERS is a virus that is new to humans and was first reported in Saudi Arabia in 2012. As of May 16, there have been 572 laboratory-confirmed cases of MERS virus infection in 15 countries with 173 deaths, the CDC said.

Most of these people developed severe acute respiratory illness, with fever, cough, and shortness of breath. Officials do not know where the virus came from or exactly how it spreads. There is no available vaccine or specific treatment recommended for the virus.
Editor: xuxin

…..

CDC: MERS virus spread in US, but 2nd man not sick

Sunday, May 18, 2014

NEW YORK — Health officials reported Saturday what appears to be the first time that a mysterious Middle East virus has spread from one person to another in the United States.

The Illinois man probably picked up an infection from an Indiana man who earlier this month became the first U.S. case of Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS. The Illinois man, however, never needed medical treatment and is reported to be feeling well, officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said.

The two men met twice before the Indiana man fell ill and was hospitalized in Munster, Indiana, shortly after traveling from Saudi Arabia, where he lived and was employed as a health care worker. Health officials say they think the virus spread during a 40-minute business meeting that involved no more contact than a handshake.

“We don’t think this changes the risk to the general public,” which remains low, said Dr. David Swerdlow of the CDC.

The new report also is not considered evidence that the virus is spreading more easily among people than previously thought, he said. The virus is not considered to be highly contagious, and health officials believe it only spreads from person to person with close contact. Many of those who have gotten sick in the Middle East have been family members or health care workers caring for a MERS patient.

The CDC said tests completed Friday provided evidence that the Illinois man had an infection at some point. Since the first man’s diagnosis, health officials have been monitoring and testing anyone who was in close contact with him, including health care workers and household members, but none of the rest of them has tested positive for the virus.

 

Read More Here

…..

Enhanced by Zemanta

Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

File:Neutrophil and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococccus aureus (MRSA) Bacteria.jpg

 

Scanning electron micrograph of neutrophil ingesting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. Credit: NIAID   National Institutes of Health.

NIAID/NIH

Wikimedia.org

 

…..

May 13 2014 03:04 AM Biological Hazard Denmark [The area was not defined.] Damage level Details

 

……

RSOE EDIS

Biological Hazard in Denmark on Tuesday, 13 May, 2014 at 03:04 (03:04 AM) UTC.

Description
A troubling and also kind of odd story came out of Denmark this weekend. In a court proceeding, a microbiologist has disclosed that three residents of the country who had no known connection to farming died of MRSA infections caused by ST398, the livestock-associated strain of drug-resistant staph that first appeared among pig farmers in the Netherlands in 2004 and has since moved through Europe, Canada and the United States. If the report is correct – and sources have told me it is, but I’ve seen no data to confirm it – it reinforces the concern that bacteria which become resistant because of antibiotic use on farms can move off farms and affect the health of people who have no connection to farming. Livestock MRSA has always one of the best cases for establishing that, because the drug to which it showed the greatest resistance, tetracycline, wasn’t used against human MRSA in the Netherlands, but was used routinely on farms – so the only place the strain could have picked up its unique resistance pattern was in pigs. (Here’s my long archive of posts on pig MRSA, dating back to my book Superbug where the story was told for the first time.) Just to get them high up, here are some Danish news sources; this sees to have been a widely covered story. Danish isn’t one of my languages, so I’ve relied on Google Translate – not the best practice, but there’s enough agreement among the stories that I am comfortable with it in this case.
Biohazard name: MRSA (pig, human)
Biohazard level: 3/4 Hight
Biohazard desc.: Bacteria and viruses that can cause severe to fatal disease in humans, but for which vaccines or other treatments exist, such as anthrax, West Nile virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis, SARS virus, variola virus (smallpox), tuberculosis, typhus, Rift Valley fever, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, yellow fever, and malaria. Among parasites Plasmodium falciparum, which causes Malaria, and Trypanosoma cruzi, which causes trypanosomiasis, also come under this level.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

 

…..

Denmark: Three Deaths from Drug-Resistant “Pig MRSA”

ICStefanescu (CC), Flickr

A troubling and also kind of odd story came out of Denmark this weekend. In a court proceeding, a microbiologist has disclosed that three residents of the country who had no known connection to farming died of MRSA infections caused by ST398, the livestock-associated strain of drug-resistant staph that first appeared among pig farmers in the Netherlands in 2004 and has since moved through Europe, Canada and the United States.

If the report is correct — and sources have told me it is, but I’ve seen no data to confirm it — it reinforces the concern that bacteria which become resistant because of antibiotic use on farms can move off farms and affect the health of people who have no connection to farming.

Livestock MRSA has always one of the best cases for establishing that, because the drug to which it showed the greatest resistance, tetracycline, wasn’t used against human MRSA in the Netherlands, but was used routinely on farms — so the only place the strain could have picked up its unique resistance pattern was in pigs. (Here’s my long archive of posts on pig MRSA, dating back to my book Superbug where the story was told for the first time.)

Just to get them high up, here are some Danish news sources; this sees to have been a widely covered story. Danish isn’t one of my languages, so I’ve relied on Google Translate — not the best practice, but there’s enough agreement among the stories that I am comfortable with it in this case.

  • The Information: “Filthy use of antibiotics”
  • Kvalls Posten: “Resistant swine bacterium has killed three Danes”
  • DR DK: “Politicians are worried about swine bacteria”
  • Avisen: “Three Danes die of swine bacteria”
  • Ekstra Bladet: “Three died from killer bacteria from pigs”
  • Fyens: “University hospital physician: Three died of swine bacteria”

 

Read More Here

…..

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Second MERS Case Shows Hospitals Are Ground Zero for MERS

The patient started feeling ill as he sat on a packed flight from Jeddah to London. Things didn’t get any better after he boarded another flight to Boston, or a third flight to Atlanta, or even as he took one last miserable leg to Orlando.

If he’d been watching the news, he should have known it was at least possible that he had MERS, the mysterious new Middle East respiratory virus. It’s been spreading in Saudi Arabia and has infected more than 570 people globally, killing 171 of them. The biggest risk factor is being a health care worker, like the patient.

Still, he boarded multiple flights and came into an Orlando hospital without warning he had respiratory symptoms and had come from Saudi Arabia. He spent hours in a public emergency room, potentially exposing other patients to his infection.

Showing up in an emergency department without warning results in just what has happened in Orlando — 20 health care workers in quarantine for two weeks. Patients who were in the waiting room are being tracked down just to be sure they know what to do if they develop cough or fever.

Two workers who helped care for him did develop respiratory symptoms, causing a great deal of concern, but they have tested negative for MERS.

The case shows just how important it is to control infections at hospitals.

“We feel like getting infection control is issue number one,” the World Health Organization’s Dr. Keiji Fukuda told a news conference on Wednesday.

“If you get sick within 14 days of being in the Arabian Peninsula, call a doctor and tell the doctor where you traveled.”

There’s little excuse for not knowing about the possibility of infection now — the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is posting signs at major airports, warning of the symptoms. “If you get sick within 14 days of being in the Arabian Peninsula, call a doctor and tell the doctor where you traveled,” the signs advise.

And now the World Health Organization, has too, even as it stopped short of declaring MERS a global health emergency.

CDC has repeated this advice at regular intervals, most recently after an Indiana man who’d been working in a Saudi hospital became the first U.S. MERS patient. He doesn’t remember having treated anyone with MERS but did work at a hospital in Riyadh with MERS cases.

The second patient also worked at a hospital where MERS was being treated, this one in Jeddah, his doctors said.

The 44-year-old health care worker laid low with relatives in the Orlando area for a few days, finally feeling bad enough to go to the emergency room at Dr. P. Phillips Hospital. He was admitted May 9, and tests confirmed on Monday he was the second patient to show up in the United States with MERS.

But the professionals who treated him on Friday night already suspected he might have MERS. Anyone coming from the Arabian peninsula with respiratory symptoms should be considered a potential case, CDC says. That means extreme hygiene measures, including an isolation room.

“I have to wear a special mask called an N-95 (respirator). I have to wear a gown and gloves. Once we get out of the room we dispose of everything,” said Dr. Antonio Crespo, infectious disease specialist and chief quality officer for the P. Phillips Hospital.

Read More and Watch Videos Here

…..

Press Release

For Immediate Release: Tuesday, May 12, 2014
Contact: CDC Media Relations
(404) 639-3286

CDC announces second imported case of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in the United States

MERS case in traveler from Saudi Arabia hospitalized in Florida

A second imported case of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) was confirmed late night on May 11 in a traveler to the United States. This patient is a healthcare worker who resides and works in Saudi Arabia. This case is unlinked to the first U.S. imported case of MERS reported May 2 in Indiana. Despite this second imported case, the risk to the U.S. general public from MERS still remains very low. Both imported MERS cases are healthcare workers who recently worked in and traveled from Saudi Arabia.

“This second confirmed case of MERS in a person who worked in health care from an area of risk is not surprising,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “To continue to strengthen our own health security, we need to increase our global ability to support other countries to help them find and stop threats such as MERS promptly, and to prevent them whenever possible.”

On May 1, the patient traveled by plane from Jeddah, Saudi Arabia to London, England, to Boston, Massachusetts, to Atlanta, Georgia, and to Orlando, Florida. The patient reported feeling unwell during the flight from Jeddah to London and continued to feel unwell on subsequent flights with reported symptoms that include fever, chills and a slight cough. On May 9, the patient went to the emergency department of a hospital in Florida and was admitted the same day. The patient is isolated, being well cared for, and is currently doing well.

Because of the patient’s symptoms and travel history, the Florida Department of Health officials tested the patient for MERS Coronavirus (MERS-CoV), the virus that causes MERS. Those tests were positive, and CDC confirmed MERS-CoV infection in the patient late last night.

“Given the dramatic increase in MERS cases in the Arabian Peninsula, we expected and are prepared for additional imported cases,” said Dr. Anne Schuchat, assistant surgeon general and director of CDC’s National Center for Immunizations and Respiratory Diseases. “The reason for this increase in cases is not yet known, but public health investigations are ongoing, and we are pleased to have a team in Saudi Arabia supporting some of those efforts.”

CDC and Florida health officials are not yet sure how the patient became infected with the virus.  Exposure may have occurred in Saudi Arabia, where outbreaks of MERS-CoV infection are occurring. Officials also do not know at this time exactly how many people had close contact with the patient.

Federal, state, and local health officials are taking action to minimize the risk of spread of the virus.  The hospital is using standard, contact, and airborne isolation precautions, to avoid exposure to MERS-CoV within the hospital.

As part of the prevention and control measures, officials have begun reaching out to healthcare professionals, family members, and others who had close contact with the patient to provide guidance about monitoring their health and recommending they see a healthcare provider for an evaluation. Public health officials are working with airlines to identify and notify U.S. travelers who may have been in close contact with the patient on any of the flights.

“The rapid identification and response to this case are a reflection of all of the work that CDC and partners have done over the past two years to prepare for MERS entering the United States,” said Schuchat.

All reported cases of MERS have been linked to countries in the Arabian Peninsula. In some instances, the virus has spread from person to person through close contact, such as caring for or living with an infected person. However, there is currently no evidence of sustained spread of MERS-CoV in community settings. “The risk to the U.S. general public from MERS still remains very low,” said Schuchat.

While experts do not yet know exactly how this virus is spread, CDC advises Americans to help protect themselves from respiratory illnesses by washing hands often, avoiding close contact with people who are sick, avoiding touching their eyes, nose and/or mouth with unwashed hands, and disinfecting frequently touched surfaces.

At this time, CDC does not recommend anyone change their travel plans. CDC advises people traveling to the Arabian Peninsula who work in a healthcare setting to follow CDC’s recommendations for infection control. Other travelers to the Arabian Peninsula should take general steps to protect their health. Anyone who develops fever and symptoms of respiratory illness, such as cough or shortness of breath, within 14 days after traveling from countries in or near the Arabian Peninsula should call ahead to a doctor and mention their recent travel.

Background
Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a virus that is new to humans and was first reported in Saudi Arabia in 2012. So far, including this U.S. importation, there have been 538 confirmed cases of MERS in 14 countries. Most of these people developed severe acute respiratory illness, with fever, cough, and shortness of breath; 145 people died. Officials do not know where the virus came from or exactly how it spreads. There is no available vaccine or specific treatment recommended for the virus.

For more information about MERS-CoV, please visit:

###
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICESExternal Web Site Icon

…..

Enhanced by Zemanta

Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

…..

Biological Hazard Lebanon [The area was not defined.] Damage level Details

 

…..

RSOE EDIS

Biological Hazard in Lebanon on Friday, 09 May, 2014 at 03:12 (03:12 AM) UTC.

Description
Lebanon has registered its first case of the deadly MERS corona virus, but the person who contracted it was released after showing signs of recovery, the ministry said Thursday. The news came as Saudi Arabia, the country worst hit by the disease, announced four more deaths, bringing the toll to 121 since its first appearance there in September 2012. “On Thursday afternoon, a patient who had been in hospital was diagnosed as being a carrier” of the virus, the ministry said, adding that the patient left the hospital after treatment “led to a significant improvement in his health.” The ministry said “citizens have no cause for panic. They should take normal precautions to prevent respiratory diseases.” It added that it was carrying out studies to “assure itself that there no epidemic in Lebanon” and urged doctors and hospitals to “take maximum precautions and inform the ministry of any suspect cases.” Abou Faour had toured the airport with head of the Health Parliamentary Committee, MP Atef Majdalani, in order to indicate the measures taken to prevent the entry of this virus to Lebanon. “Samples from individuals suspected of carrying the virus were analyzed and it turned out there was no case of Coronavirus (MERS) in Lebanon,” he assured.
Biohazard name: MERS-CoV (Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus)
Biohazard level: 4/4 Hazardous
Biohazard desc.: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, H5N1(bird flu), Dengue hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic or unidentified diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 (P4) lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

 

…..

Lebanon registers first case of MERS - health ministry

Lebanon has registered the first case of the deadly Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) coronavirus, but the person who contracted it was released after showing signs of recovery, the health ministry said Thursday, according to AFP.

The news came as Saudi Arabia, the country worst hit by the disease, announced four more deaths, bringing the toll to 121 since its first appearance there in September 2012.

“On Thursday afternoon, a patient who had been in hospital was diagnosed as being a carrier” of the virus, the ministry said, adding that the patient left the hospital after treatment “led to a significant improvement in his health.”

The ministry said “citizens have no cause for panic. They should take normal precautions to prevent respiratory diseases.

“It added that it was carrying out studies to “assure itself that there no epidemic in Lebanon” and urged doctors and hospitals to “take maximum precautions and inform the ministry of any suspect cases.”

Many Lebanese work in the Gulf, particularly in Saudi Arabia.

In humans, MERS causes coughing, fever and pneumonia. Cases have been reported in Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Kuwait, Jordan, United Arab Emirates, Malaysia, Oman, Tunisia, France, Germany, Spain, Italy and Britain.

Egypt warns against travel to Saudi Arabia due to MERS virus

Egypt’s Health Ministry issued a warning on Friday against children, elderly people and anyone suffering from chronic heart and chest diseases travelling to Saudi Arabia due to an outbreak there of a deadly new virus. Saudi Arabia said on Thursday the number of cases of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), an often fatal disease caused by a coronavirus, had nearly doubled in April, with 26 more infections reported on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Of the more than 370 people who caught the disease in Saudi Arabia, 107 have died since MERS first emerged two years ago.

The first case of the disease in Egypt was reported on Saturday – a 27-year-old man who lives in Saudi Arabia but returned ill to Egypt last week after having been in contact with an uncle in the kingdom who died of MERS.

International concern about the disease is acute because Saudi Arabia is expected to receive large numbers of foreign pilgrims during the fasting month of Ramadan in July, followed by millions more for Islam’s annual haj pilgrimage in October.

In a statement, Egypt’s health ministry said that anyone under the age of 15 or older than 65, as well as pregnant women and people suffering from chronic heart and chest diseases, should postpone pilgrimages to Saudi Arabia.

It said no further MERS cases had been confirmed in Egypt. The man who contracted the virus is in a stable condition in a hospital in Cairo, a health ministry official told Reuters.

26 more cases of MERS virus in Saudi Arabia, 10 dead

Saudi Arabia confirmed 26 more cases of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), which has killed nearly a third of sufferers, and said 10 more people have died from the disease.

The confirmations follow Egypt’s announcement on Saturday that it had confirmed its first case of MERS in a man who had recently returned to the country from Riyadh, where he was working.

Saudi Arabia, where MERS was discovered around two years ago and which remains the country most affected, has now had 339 confirmed cases of MERS, of which 102 have been fatal, Reuters reports.

The 143 cases announced since the start of April represent a 73 percent jump in total infections in Saudi Arabia this month.

The new cases were announced in two statements published on the Health Ministry website on Saturday and Sunday.

The 10 confirmed on Saturday included seven in Jeddah, the focal point for the recent outbreak, two in the capital Riyadh and another in Mecca. Two MERS patients died.

The 16 further cases confirmed on Sunday included two in Riyadh, eight in Jeddah and another six in the northern city of Tabuk. Eight MERS sufferers died on Sunday.

The acting health minister, Adel Fakieh, said on Saturday he had designated three hospitals in Riyadh, Jeddah and Dammam on the Gulf coast as specialist centers for MERS treatment.

The three hospitals can accommodate 146 patients in intensive care, he said in comments carried by local press on Sunday.

Many Saudis have voiced concerns on social media about government handling of the outbreak, and last week King Abdullah sacked the health minister.

In Jeddah, some people are wearing facemasks and avoiding public gatherings, while pharmacies say sales of hand sanitizers and other hygiene products are soaring.

Read also: 

Deadly virus from Middle East arrives in US – doctors

Lab gains grant to create MERS vaccine

 

…..

Enhanced by Zemanta

US officials expect Mers patient to be released soon from Indiana hospital

Healthcare worker who contracted Middle East Respiratory Syndrome in Saudi Arabia, has been hospitalized since 28 April

  • theguardian.com, Monday 5 May 2014 13.01 EDT
Mers
At least 400 people have had the respiratory illness, and more than 100 people have died. All had ties to the Middle East region or to people who traveled there. Photo:/AP

Health officials said Monday they expect the first patient in the United States diagnosed with a mysterious virus from the Middle East to be released soon from an Indiana hospital, though he could continue to be isolated at home.

The man has been hospitalized at a Munster hospital since 28 April. Officials said he fell ill with Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or Mers, after flying to the US last month from Saudi Arabia, where he is a healthcare worker.

Indiana State Department of Health Commissioner William VanNess II said during a news conference with officials from the hospital and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Monday that no health workers or family members who’ve had contact with the patient have tested positive for the virus. The virus has an incubation period of two to 14 days.

About 50 hospital employees had contact with the patient before he was placed in isolation, said Alan Kumar, chief medical information officer at Community Hospital.

The man flew from Riyadh, Saudi Arabia to the United States on 24 April, with a stop in London. He landed in Chicago and took a bus to Indiana, health officials said.

 

Read More Here

 

…..

Boston Herald

1st American MERS patient released from hospital

Friday, May 9, 2014

MUNSTER, Ind. — The first American diagnosed with a mysterious virus from the Middle East has been released from a northwestern Indiana hospital.

Community Hospital in Munster says the patient was released Friday, is considered fully recovered and has been cleared to travel, if necessary.

Community Hospital chief medical information officer Dr. Alan Kumar says the patient has tested negative for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, and “poses no threat to the community.”

 

Read More Here

…..

Enhanced by Zemanta

Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

…..

Biological Hazard India State of Madhya Pradesh, Meghnagar Damage level Details

 

…..

RSOE EDIS

Biological Hazard in India on Tuesday, 06 May, 2014 at 03:03 (03:03 AM) UTC.

Description
The contagious disease measles, popularly known as ‘Chhoti Mata’ is spreading in the villages, which fall under the CHC (Community Health Centre) of village Madrani. Till now, the disease has claimed lives of two children in village Dhebar and of one infant girl in Vasunia Sat Falia of Madrani. After the death of two children, the health department held a check-up camp and found 29 children affected by this disease. However, as per unofficial guess, the number of affected children may be more than double of this number. As an instance, Rajia Bhuria of village Kelkua his two sons and one daughter are affected by this disease, but he did not contact doctors and went to the ‘Badwa’ (traditional faith healer), who tied a sacred thread on the hands of affected children. The tribal still believe in these sorts of faith healers and the treatment of worshipping the Mataji (deity) can heal the suffering children. Because of these superstitions, many of the tribal have not approached to the doctors and therefore, the health department does not know the right number of affected children.Superstitions and inefficient CHC together multiplying the problem Another aspect of this situation is the various drawbacks of this CHC of Madrani. The most important is of insufficient staff provided at this health centre. There is only one doctor and one ANM at this centre, who have the responsibility of more than a dozen villages around this CHC. Moreover, many villagers among the thousands of villagers living in these villages have complaint that, when they come to the CHC, they do not find the doctor or nurse here. In these circumstances, the villagers again get turned towards the ‘Badwas or Tantriks’. Many times, when the disease gets cured naturally or due to use of some herbs, their faith in these faith healers become stronger. Because of high influence of such superstitions in these areas, these people do not approach to doctors and the result is evident that even after the death of three children, people are not bringing the affected children to the doctors. During the check-up camp and visits of doctors, many malnourished children were also seen, but the doctors ignored their need for treatment and dietary recommendations or providing them the facilities of government schemes for malnourished children.What doctors said? “Symptoms of measles were found in 29 children, among them 3 died and 24 children have recovered, to whom, the dose of vitamin A were given. Two more children are recovering”. Dr. Ajnar, Madrani Community Health Centre “This is a viral disease, which spread in May-June and usually after every four years. The department is trying its best for treatment of affected children, but due to lack of awareness, the villagers are not bringing the children to the hospital”.
Biohazard name: Measles (fatal)
Biohazard level: 2/4 Medium
Biohazard desc.: Bacteria and viruses that cause only mild disease to humans, or are difficult to contract via aerosol in a lab setting, such as hepatitis A, B, and C, influenza A, Lyme disease, salmonella, mumps, measles, scrapie, dengue fever, and HIV. “Routine diagnostic work with clinical specimens can be done safely at Biosafety Level 2, using Biosafety Level 2 practices and procedures. Research work (including co-cultivation, virus replication studies, or manipulations involving concentrated virus) can be done in a BSL-2 (P2) facility, using BSL-3 practices and procedures. Virus production activities, including virus concentrations, require a BSL-3 (P3) facility and use of BSL-3 practices and procedures”, see Recommended Biosafety Levels for Infectious Agents.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

 

……

Measles spreads in villages, 3 die, over 30 affected

fpj-default-image-new2

Meghnagar: The contagious disease measles, popularly known as ‘Chhoti Mata’ is spreading in the villages, which fall under the CHC (Community Health Centre) of village Madrani. Till now, the disease has claimed lives of two children in village Dhebar and of one infant girl in Vasunia Sat Falia of Madrani.

After the death of two children, the health department held a check-up camp and found 29 children affected by this disease. However, as per unofficial guess, the number of affected children may be more than double of this number.

As an instance, Rajia Bhuria of village Kelkua his two sons and one daughter are affected by this disease, but he did not contact doctors and went to the ‘Badwa’ (traditional faith healer), who tied a sacred thread on the hands of affected children. The tribal still believe in these sorts of faith healers and the treatment of worshipping the Mataji (deity) can heal the suffering children.

Because of these superstitions, many of the tribal have not approached to the doctors and therefore, the health department does not know the right number of affected children.Superstitions and inefficient CHC together multiplying the problem Another aspect of this situation is the various drawbacks of this CHC of Madrani.

The most important is of insufficient staff provided at this health centre. There is only one doctor and one ANM at this centre, who have the responsibility of more than a dozen villages around this CHC. Moreover, many villagers among the thousands of villagers living in these villages have complaint that, when they come to the CHC, they do not find the doctor or nurse here.

Read More Here

 

…..

Enhanced by Zemanta

Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

The Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus is seen in an undated transmission electron micrograph from the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). (Reuters/National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases)
The Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus is seen in an undated transmission electron micrograph from the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). (Reuters/National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases)

…..

March 14 2014 01:26 PM Biological Hazard Saudi Arabia Provinces of Riyadh, Tabuk and Makkah, [Riyadh, Tabuk and Riyadh] Damage level Details

 

…..

Biological Hazard in Saudi Arabia on Friday, 14 March, 2014 at 13:26 (01:26 PM) UTC.

Description
Saudi Arabia says a man has died from a new respiratory virus related to SARS, bringing to 63 the number of deaths in the kingdom at the center of the outbreak. The health ministry said on Friday that the latest victim, a 19-year-old, died in the city of al-Kharj, southeast of Riyadh, according to a report from the Associated Press news agency. Two of his sisters are in hospital on suspicion they have been infected with the virus. The new virus is related to SARS, or severe acute respiratory syndrome, which killed some 800 people in a global outbreak in 2003. It belongs to a family of viruses that most often causes the common cold.
Biohazard name: MERS-COv
Biohazard level: 4/4 Hazardous
Biohazard desc.: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, H5N1(bird flu), Dengue hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic or unidentified diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 (P4) lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

 

…..

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,594 other followers