Category: Asteroids


Space Weather

by Dr. Tony Phillips.

All Sky Fireball Network

 

Every night, a network of NASA all-sky cameras scans the skies above the United States for meteoritic fireballs. Automated software maintained by NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office calculates their orbits, velocity, penetration depth in Earth’s atmosphere and many other characteristics. Daily results are presented here on Spaceweather.com.

On May. 11, 2014, the network reported 9 fireballs.
(7 sporadics, 2 eta Aquariids)

In this diagram of the inner solar system, all of the fireball orbits intersect at a single point–Earth. The orbits are color-coded by velocity, from slow (red) to fast (blue). [Larger image] [movies]

Near Earth Asteroids

Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) are space rocks larger than approximately 100m that can come closer to Earth than 0.05 AU. None of the known PHAs is on a collision course with our planet, although astronomers are finding new ones all the time.

On May 14, 2014 there were 1473 potentially hazardous asteroids.

Recent & Upcoming Earth-asteroid encounters:

Asteroid
Date(UT)
Miss Distance
Size
2014 HT178
May 8
5.9 LD
21 m
2014 JD
May 9
7.7 LD
24 m
2014 JG55
May 10
0.3 LD
7 m
2014 JW55
May 13
4.3 LD
23 m
2014 JH15
May 17
8 LD
59 m
2010 JO33
May 17
4 LD
43 m
2005 UK1
May 20
36.7 LD
1.1 km
1997 WS22
May 21
47.1 LD
1.5 km
2002 JC
May 24
48.7 LD
1.4 km
2014 HQ124
Jun 8
3.2 LD
615 m

Notes: LD means “Lunar Distance.” 1 LD = 384,401 km, the distance between Earth and the Moon. 1 LD also equals 0.00256 AU. MAG is the visual magnitude of the asteroid on the date of closest approach.

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Space Weather.com

by Dr. Tony Phillips.

All Sky Fireball Network

Every night, a network of NASA all-sky cameras scans the skies above the United States for meteoritic fireballs. Automated software maintained by NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office calculates their orbits, velocity, penetration depth in Earth’s atmosphere and many other characteristics. Daily results are presented here on Spaceweather.com.

On Apr. 25, 2014, the network reported 9 fireballs.
(9 sporadics)

In this diagram of the inner solar system, all of the fireball orbits intersect at a single point–Earth. The orbits are color-coded by velocity, from slow (red) to fast (blue). [Larger image] [movies]

On Apr. 24, 2014, the network reported 19 fireballs.
(15 sporadics, 4 April Lyrids)

In this diagram of the inner solar system, all of the fireball orbits intersect at a single point–Earth. The orbits are color-coded by velocity, from slow (red) to fast (blue). [Larger image] [movies]

Near Earth Asteroids

Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) are space rocks larger than approximately 100m that can come closer to Earth than 0.05 AU. None of the known PHAs is on a collision course with our planet, although astronomers are finding new ones all the time.

On April 26, 2014 there were 1466 potentially hazardous asteroids.

Recent & Upcoming Earth-asteroid encounters:

Asteroid
Date(UT)
Miss Distance
Size
2014 GG49
Apr 19
3.9 LD
31 m
2014 HP2
Apr 24
3.8 LD
15 m
2014 HU2
Apr 25
3.7 LD
22 m
2014 HM4
Apr 25
1.6 LD
18 m
2014 HW
Apr 27
2.1 LD
10 m
2007 HB15
Apr 28
6.7 LD
12 m
2014 HL2
Apr 28
8.8 LD
26 m
2014 HV2
Apr 29
1.4 LD
33 m
2010 JO33
May 17
4 LD
43 m
2005 UK1
May 20
36.7 LD
1.1 km
1997 WS22
May 21
47.1 LD
1.5 km
2002 JC
May 24
48.7 LD
1.4 km

Notes: LD means “Lunar Distance.” 1 LD = 384,401 km, the distance between Earth and the Moon. 1 LD also equals 0.00256 AU. MAG is the visual magnitude of the asteroid on the date of closest approach.

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Earth Watch Report  -  Space

Image Source  NASA

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RSOE EDIS

 Earth approaching objects (objects that are known in the next 30 days)

 

Object Name Apporach Date Left AU Distance LD Distance Estimated Diameter* Relative Velocity
(2012 RJ15) 11th March 2014 0 day(s) 0.1119 43.5 51 m – 110 m 13.72 km/s 49392 km/h
(2002 SZ) 11th March 2014 0 day(s) 0.1059 41.2 220 m – 490 m 19.28 km/s 69408 km/h
(2012 RJ15) 11th March 2014 0 day(s) 0.1119 43.5 51 m – 110 m 13.72 km/s 49392 km/h
(2002 SZ) 11th March 2014 0 day(s) 0.1059 41.2 220 m – 490 m 19.28 km/s 69408 km/h
(2001 SQ3) 11th March 2014 0 day(s) 0.1871 72.8 130 m – 280 m 18.26 km/s 65736 km/h
(2013 UX2) 12th March 2014 1 day(s) 0.1482 57.7 3.8 m – 8.6 m 2.94 km/s 10584 km/h
(2010 FR9) 14th March 2014 3 day(s) 0.1210 47.1 16 m – 36 m 10.80 km/s 38880 km/h
(2014 AY28) 16th March 2014 5 day(s) 0.0429 16.7 120 m – 270 m 5.37 km/s 19332 km/h
(2005 FN) 17th March 2014 6 day(s) 0.0812 31.6 11 m – 25 m 8.09 km/s 29124 km/h
(2012 XB112) 17th March 2014 6 day(s) 0.1175 45.7 2.5 m 4.02 km/s 14471.999999999998 km/h
(2013 WT44) 17th March 2014 6 day(s) 0.0327 12.7 320 m – 710 m 11.13 km/s 40068 km/h
(2004 YC) 19th March 2014 8 day(s) 0.1054 41.0 20 m – 45 m 9.35 km/s 33660 km/h
(2003 YX1) 20th March 2014 9 day(s) 0.1654 64.4 180 m – 390 m 11.76 km/s 42336 km/h
322756 (2001 CK32) 20th March 2014 9 day(s) 0.1465 57.0 440 m – 990 m 9.06 km/s 32616 km/h
(2011 HH) 20th March 2014 9 day(s) 0.1016 39.5 23 m – 52 m 5.04 km/s 18144 km/h
(2012 FK15) 21st March 2014 10 day(s) 0.1495 58.2 13 m – 30 m 13.66 km/s 49176 km/h
(2003 HT42) 22nd March 2014 11 day(s) 0.0942 36.6 29 m – 65 m 7.54 km/s 27144 km/h
325102 (2008 EY5) 23rd March 2014 12 day(s) 0.0789 30.7 250 m – 570 m 12.89 km/s 46404 km/h
(2013 GW68) 24th March 2014 13 day(s) 0.1950 75.9 110 m – 240 m 16.74 km/s 60263.99999999999 km/h
(2011 EN40) 24th March 2014 13 day(s) 0.1662 64.7 220 m – 490 m 27.82 km/s 100152 km/h
(2013 FD8) 25th March 2014 14 day(s) 0.0851 33.1 19 m – 43 m 11.55 km/s 41580 km/h
143649 (2003 QQ47) 25th March 2014 14 day(s) 0.1283 49.9 880 m – 2.0 km 32.41 km/s 116675.99999999999 km/h
(2012 FM35) 27th March 2014 16 day(s) 0.1916 74.6 9.2 m – 21 m 8.84 km/s 31824 km/h
(2011 FT53) 27th March 2014 16 day(s) 0.1007 39.2 23 m – 52 m 12.36 km/s 44496 km/h
(2012 EA) 29th March 2014 18 day(s) 0.0356 13.9 11 m – 25 m 6.00 km/s 21600 km/h
(2009 FW25) 29th March 2014 18 day(s) 0.0715 27.8 56 m – 120 m 12.34 km/s 44424 km/h
(2009 FD) 31st March 2014 20 day(s) 0.1009 39.3 100 m – 230 m 12.89 km/s 46404 km/h
(2009 SA100) 31st March 2014 20 day(s) 0.0445 17.3 44 m – 99 m 7.99 km/s 28764 km/h
(2010 GD35) 31st March 2014 20 day(s) 0.0489 19.0 33 m – 75 m 11.07 km/s 39852 km/h
(2009 CT) 31st March 2014 20 day(s) 0.1984 77.2 320 m – 710 m 13.35 km/s 48060 km/h
243566 (1995 SA) 01st April 2014 21 day(s) 0.1879 73.1 970 m – 2.2 km 14.22 km/s 51192 km/h
(2001 QC34) 01st April 2014 21 day(s) 0.1082 42.1 250 m – 570 m 4.78 km/s 17208 km/h
(2013 TT5) 03rd April 2014 23 day(s) 0.0959 37.3 15 m – 33 m 4.04 km/s 14544 km/h
86878 (2000 HD24) 03rd April 2014 23 day(s) 0.1084 42.2 800 m – 1.8 km 20.44 km/s 73584 km/h
(2010 GC35) 06th April 2014 26 day(s) 0.0677 26.3 31 m – 68 m 4.59 km/s 16524 km/h
(2008 OC6) 07th April 2014 27 day(s) 0.1949 75.8 530 m – 1.2 km 14.34 km/s 51624 km/h
330659 (2008 GG2) 09th April 2014 29 day(s) 0.1450 56.4 77 m – 170 m 7.16 km/s 25776 km/h
1 AU = ~150 million kilometers,1 LD = Lunar Distance = ~384,000 kilometers Source: NASA-NEO

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Space Weather

by Dr. Tony Phillips.

 All Sky Fireball Network

Every night, a network of NASA all-sky cameras scans the skies above the United States for meteoritic fireballs. Automated software maintained by NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office calculates their orbits, velocity, penetration depth in Earth’s atmosphere and many other characteristics. Daily results are presented here on Spaceweather.com.

On Mar. 10, 2014, the network reported 3 fireballs.
(3 sporadics)

In this diagram of the inner solar system, all of the fireball orbits intersect at a single point–Earth. The orbits are color-coded by velocity, from slow (red) to fast (blue). [Larger image] [movies]

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Universe Today

Now’s the Time to See Asteroid Pallas at its Best

by David Dickinson on February 18, 2014

2 Pallas

Images of 2 Pallas taken by Hubble (right) and a simulation (left) of the surface. Credit: NASA/JPL.

Looking for something off of the beaten celestial path to observe? The coming weeks will offer telescope users a rare chance to catch a well known asteroid, as it puts on its best show for over two decades.

Over the coming weeks, 2 Pallas, one of the “big four” asteroids – or do you say minor/dwarf planet/planetoid? – reaches a favorable observing point known as opposition. Gliding northward through the constellations of Hydra and Sextans through February and March 2014, 2 Pallas presents a favorable binocular challenge for both northern and southern hemisphere observers as it rises to the east opposite to the setting Sun and transits the local meridian around midnight.

And although 2 Pallas reaches opposition roughly every 16 months as seen from our Earthly vantage point, 2014 provides a chance to catch it under exceptional circumstances. And to top it off, the other “Big 4” asteroids – 1 Ceres, 3 Juno and 4 Vesta – are all currently visible as well and reach opposition in the January through April time frame.

Pallas HST

2 Pallas as imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope. Credit: NASA

Pallas and its brethren also have a checkered history though the course of 19th century astronomy.  The second minor planet to be discovered, Heinrich Wilhelm Olbers spied 2 Pallas near opposition on the night of March 28th, 1802. Olbers made this discovery observing from his home rooftop observatory in Bremen, Germany using a five foot – telescopes were often measured in focal length rather than aperture in those days – Dollond refractor.

Olbers discovered 2 Pallas on the border of the astronomical constellations of Virgo and Coma Berenices shining at magnitude +7.5.

Pallas orbit

A simulation of the orbit of 2 Pallas near opposition this month. Credit: NASA/JPL Horizons.

If the name Olbers sounds familiar, it’s because he also lent it to the paradox that now bears his name. Obler’s paradox was one of the first true questions in cosmology posed in a scientific framework that asked: if the universe is actually infinite in time and space, then why isn’t the sky infinitely bright? And, on a curious side note, it was American horror author Edgar Allan Poe that delivered the answer.

But now back to our solar system. Olbers also discovered 4 Vesta just five years after Pallas.

He was definitely on a roll. The discoveries of these space rocks also grabbed the attention of Olbers contemporary, Johann Bode. Bode had formulated a law now known as the Titus-Bode Law that seemed to put the spacing of then known bodies of the solar system in tidy order. In fact, the Titus-Bode law seemed to predict that a body should lie between Mars and Jupiter, and for a brief time in the 18th century — and again in 2006 when the International Astronomical Union let Eris and Pluto in the door before kicking them back out — Ceres, Pallas, Juno and Vesta were all considered planets.

Read More Here

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Earth Watch Report  -  Space

Image Source  NASA

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  Earth approaching objects (objects that are known in the next 30 days)

Object Name Apporach Date Left AU Distance LD Distance Estimated Diameter* Relative Velocity
(2013 BZ45) 02nd February 2014 1 day(s) 0.0688 26.8 110 m – 250 m 8.98 km/s 32328 km/h
(2009 CG) 04th February 2014 3 day(s) 0.1311 51.0 70 m – 160 m 12.93 km/s 46548 km/h
(2011 MW1) 05th February 2014 4 day(s) 0.1017 39.6 92 m – 210 m 11.06 km/s 39816 km/h
348306 (2005 AY28) 06th February 2014 5 day(s) 0.0394 15.3 130 m – 300 m 17.06 km/s 61415.99999999999 km/h
(2004 AS1) 08th February 2014 7 day(s) 0.1286 50.0 210 m – 470 m 12.85 km/s 46260 km/h
(2006 DP14) 09th February 2014 8 day(s) 0.0160 6.2 460 m – 1.0 km 27.13 km/s 97668 km/h
(2013 BS45) 10th February 2014 9 day(s) 0.0317 12.3 18 m – 39 m 3.76 km/s 13536 km/h
(2007 BG) 13th February 2014 12 day(s) 0.1476 57.5 330 m – 750 m 7.99 km/s 28764 km/h
(2008 BP16) 16th February 2014 15 day(s) 0.1672 65.1 120 m – 270 m 19.78 km/s 71208 km/h
(2000 EM26) 17th February 2014 16 day(s) 0.0227 8.8 120 m – 270 m 12.37 km/s 44532 km/h
85953 (1999 FK21) 17th February 2014 16 day(s) 0.1910 74.3 590 m 24.29 km/s 87444 km/h
(1999 SK10) 20th February 2014 19 day(s) 0.1838 71.5 320 m – 710 m 11.48 km/s 41328 km/h
(2012 DY43) 20th February 2014 19 day(s) 0.0403 15.7 67 m – 150 m 19.41 km/s 69876 km/h
(2001 EB18) 21st February 2014 20 day(s) 0.1161 45.2 370 m – 820 m 26.33 km/s 94788 km/h
(2006 DS14) 22nd February 2014 21 day(s) 0.1644 64.0 220 m – 490 m 14.41 km/s 51876 km/h
(2009 EC1) 25th February 2014 24 day(s) 0.1246 48.5 73 m – 160 m 8.07 km/s 29052 km/h
(2013 TN127) 01st March 2014 28 day(s) 0.1930 75.1 15 m – 34 m 8.18 km/s 29448 km/h
(2006 FV) 01st March 2014 28 day(s) 0.1145 44.5 64 m – 140 m 6.19 km/s 22284 km/h
1 AU = ~150 million kilometers,1 LD = Lunar Distance = ~384,000 kilometers Source: NASA-NEO

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BPEarthWatch BPEarthWatch

Published on Jan 11, 2014

Solar,Quake,Volcano and Weather Links http://www.BpearthWatch.Com
http://www.amsmeteors.org/fireball_ev…
http://lunarmeteoritehunters.blogspot…

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Space Weather

All Sky Fireball Network

by Dr. Tony Phillips.

 

Every night, a network of NASA all-sky cameras scans the skies above the United States for meteoritic fireballs. Automated software maintained by NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office calculates their orbits, velocity, penetration depth in Earth’s atmosphere and many other characteristics. Daily results are presented here on Spaceweather.com.

On Jan. 11, 2014, the network reported 14 fireballs.
(14 sporadics)

In this diagram of the inner solar system, all of the fireball orbits intersect at a single point–Earth. The orbits are color-coded by velocity, from slow (red) to fast (blue). [Larger image] [movies]

 

Near Earth Asteroids

Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) are space rocks larger than approximately 100m that can come closer to Earth than 0.05 AU. None of the known PHAs is on a collision course with our planet, although astronomers are finding new ones all the time.

On January 12, 2014 there were 1450 potentially hazardous asteroids.

Recent & Upcoming Earth-asteroid encounters:

Asteroid
Date(UT)
Miss Distance
Size
2014 AD16
Jan 8
1.5 LD
15 m
2014 AE29
Jan 9
4.1 LD
15 m
2014 AW32
Jan 10
0.5 LD
15 m
2014 AZ32
Jan 11
6.2 LD
28 m
2007 SJ
Jan 21
18.9 LD
1.9 km
2012 BX34
Jan 28
9.6 LD
13 m
2006 DP14
Feb 10
6.2 LD
730 m
2000 EM26
Feb 18
8.8 LD
195 m
2000 EE14
Mar 6
64.6 LD
1.8 km
2003 QQ47
Mar 26
49.9 LD
1.4 km

Notes: LD means “Lunar Distance.” 1 LD = 384,401 km, the distance between Earth and the Moon. 1 LD also equals 0.00256 AU. MAG is the visual magnitude of the asteroid on the date of closest approach.

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MRSTARGAZERNATION MRSTARGAZERNATION

 

Published on Jan 4, 2014

While everybody else were ringing in 2014 early Wednesday morning, scientists caught sight of what appeared to be a very small asteroid — between 2 and 3 meters in size — on a potential impact trajectory with Earth.

The observation was made at the Catalina Sky Survey near Tucson, Arizona. The space rock, designated 2014 AA, may have been the first asteroid discovery of the New Year. If the space object was an asteroid, scientists, using the scant observational data that was available to them, suggest that it probably entered Earth’s atmosphere sometime between 2 p.m. EST, Wednesday, Jan. 1 and 9 a.m. EST Thursday, Jan. 2.

Three independent projections of the space object’s possible orbit were made by Bill Gray, of the Minor Planet Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Steve Chesley from NASA’s Near Earth Object Program at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. The two scientists agree that 2014 AA probably pushed its way into Earth’s atmosphere.

Using data produced by weak signals from three infrasound detections, the crisscrossing of the white lines in this image indicates a possible impact point of asteroid 2014 AA (Peter Brown/University of Western Ontario)
Using data produced by weak signals from three infrasound detections, the crisscrossing of the white lines in this image indicates possible impact points of asteroid 2014 AA (Peter Brown/University of Western Ontario)
Because of the uncertainty of the object’s orbit, 2014 AA could have fallen anywhere along an arc that extends from Central America to East Africa.

The scientists think that the object may have impacted Earth at 9 PM EST on Jan. 1, just off the coast of West Africa.

NASA said that since another asteroid, 2008 TC3, which was also between 2 to 3 meters in size, completely broke up in October 2008 as it passed over northern Sudan, it’s doubtful that asteroid 2014 AA would have made it through its rough atmospheric entry intact.

Asteroid 2008 TC3, according to NASA, was the only other example of an incoming celestial object that was discovered just prior to hitting Earth.

The scientists are continuing their research into the fate of 2014 AA. They will be analyzing data generated by a few weak signals collected from infrasound — low frequency — monitoring stations located along the predicted impact arc to see if they could be connected to the atmospheric entry of 2014 AA

 

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Spaceweather

by Dr. Tony Phillips.

All Sky Fireball Network

Every night, a network of NASA all-sky cameras scans the skies above the United States for meteoritic fireballs. Automated software maintained by NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office calculates their orbits, velocity, penetration depth in Earth’s atmosphere and many other characteristics. Daily results are presented here on Spaceweather.com.

On Jan. 4, 2014, the network reported 35 fireballs.
(19 sporadics, 14 Quadrantids, 1 lambda Bootid, 1 December Leonis Minorid)

In this diagram of the inner solar system, all of the fireball orbits intersect at a single point–Earth. The orbits are color-coded by velocity, from slow (red) to fast (blue). [Larger image] [movies]

On Jan. 3, 2014, the network reported 27 fireballs.
(14 sporadics, 13 Quadrantids)

In this diagram of the inner solar system, all of the fireball orbits intersect at a single point–Earth. The orbits are color-coded by velocity, from slow (red) to fast (blue). 

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Earth Watch Report  -  Space

Image Source  NASA

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Earth approaching objects (objects that are known in the next 30 days)

Object Name Apporach Date Left AU Distance LD Distance Estimated Diameter* Relative Velocity
(2006 CT) 10th December 2013 0 day(s) 0.0629 24.5 92 m – 210 m 5.12 km/s 18432 km/h
(2009 XP2) 13th December 2013 3 day(s) 0.0516 20.1 24 m – 54 m 7.15 km/s 25740 km/h
(2008 TQ2) 13th December 2013 3 day(s) 0.1535 59.7 170 m – 380 m 6.82 km/s 24552 km/h
(2006 YV1) 17th December 2013 7 day(s) 0.1287 50.1 130 m – 280 m 16.87 km/s 60732 km/h
(2008 ON10) 17th December 2013 7 day(s) 0.1511 58.8 31 m – 68 m 3.82 km/s 13752 km/h
(2010 VA76) 17th December 2013 7 day(s) 0.1989 77.4 42 m – 94 m 3.99 km/s 14364 km/h
(2012 CL19) 19th December 2013 9 day(s) 0.0976 38.0 120 m – 260 m 7.89 km/s 28404 km/h
(2012 XL16) 20th December 2013 10 day(s) 0.1290 50.2 21 m – 47 m 4.35 km/s 15659.999999999998 km/h
(2005 YV128) 22nd December 2013 12 day(s) 0.1722 67.0 210 m – 470 m 14.43 km/s 51948 km/h
(2011 YD29) 27th December 2013 17 day(s) 0.0157 6.1 15 m – 33 m 6.70 km/s 24120 km/h
(2011 BT15) 27th December 2013 17 day(s) 0.0322 12.5 120 m – 270 m 6.00 km/s 21600 km/h
(2010 XZ67) 28th December 2013 18 day(s) 0.0639 24.9 310 m – 680 m 8.82 km/s 31752 km/h
(2009 XZ1) 29th December 2013 19 day(s) 0.0508 19.8 130 m – 300 m 15.28 km/s 55008 km/h
(2013 AH76) 02nd January 2014 23 day(s) 0.1899 73.9 70 m – 160 m 12.46 km/s 44856 km/h
(2013 VF13) 05th January 2014 26 day(s) 0.1864 72.5 150 m – 330 m 10.03 km/s 36108 km/h
(2013 UB1) 05th January 2014 26 day(s) 0.0725 28.2 180 m – 410 m 10.38 km/s 37368 km/h
2062 Aten 07th January 2014 28 day(s) 0.1463 56.9 1.1 km 10.25 km/s 36900 km/h
(2012 HN1) 07th January 2014 28 day(s) 0.1993 77.6 11 m – 24 m 4.96 km/s 17856 km/h
1 AU = ~150 million kilometers,1 LD = Lunar Distance = ~384,000 kilometers Source: NASA-NEO

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Earth approaching objects – Tuesday , September 17th, 2013

Earth approaching objects – Thursday August 8th , 2013

Earth approaching objects – Friday August 2nd , 2013

Earth approaching objects – Tuesday July 23rd , 2013

Earth approaching objects – Thursday July 18th , 2013

Earth approaching objects – Saturday July 13th , 2013

Earth approaching objects – Tuesday July 2nd , 2013

Earth approaching objects – Tuesday June 25th , 2013

Earth approaching objects – Saturday June 22th, 2013

Earth approaching objects – Saturday June 15th, 2013

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DAHBOO77

 

Published on Nov 12, 2013

I Have a feeling we are not being told the whole story…It looks as if Deep Impact has not missed a beat despite NASA Claiming to have lost control in September……Its still right on schedule! Dont miss the raw clip of Deep Impact footage on ISON at the end of this video!

http://www.spaceweather.com/

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php…

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/ne…

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/ne…

http://news.nationalgeographic.co.uk/…

http://neo.jpl.nasa.gov/orbits/epoxi1…

http://rt.com/news/six-tail-asteroid-…

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The Daily Galaxy

“Strange, Baffling Object” Observed by Hubble Astronomers in Asteroid Belt

Heic1320c
Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have observed a unique and baffling object in the asteroid belt that looks like a rotating lawn sprinkler or badminton shuttlecock. While this object is on an asteroid-like orbit, it looks like a comet, and is sending out tails of dust into space.

Heic1320a

“We were literally dumbfounded when we saw it,” said lead investigator David Jewitt of the University of California at Los Angeles, USA. “Even more amazingly, its tail structures change dramatically in just 13 days as it belches out dust. That also caught us by surprise. It’s hard to believe we’re looking at an asteroid.”

Normal asteroids appear as tiny points of light. But this asteroid, designated P/2013 P5, has six comet-like tails of dust radiating from it like the spokes on a wheel. It was first spotted in August of this year as an unusually fuzzy-looking object by astronomers using the Pan-STARRS 1 telescope in Hawaii.

Read More Here

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