Category: Global Disaster Watch


pt 1-2

Enhanced by Zemanta
About these ads

Earth Watch Report  -  Earthquakes

 

Papua New Guinea  -  104 EQs in the last 30 days  4.21.2014 photo PapuaNewGuinea-106EQsinthelast30days4212014_zpsfc20c73d.png

104 earthquakes in map area

  1. 5.4 97km WSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-21 16:59:05 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  2. 4.8 75km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-21 14:58:18 UTC-05:00 10.0 km

  3. 4.8 49km W of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-21 14:46:51 UTC-05:00 52.9 km

  4. 5.3 108km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-21 09:57:56 UTC-05:00 46.7 km

  5. 5.1 118km W of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-21 06:25:27 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  6. 5.2 123km W of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-21 04:04:24 UTC-05:00 46.8 km

  7. 4.5 103km WSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-21 01:32:42 UTC-05:00 56.8 km

  8. 4.7 55km WSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-20 22:37:58 UTC-05:00 36.0 km

  9. 4.5 92km S of Kandrian, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-20 18:00:21 UTC-05:00 35.2 km

  10. 4.6 119km SSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-20 10:58:08 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  11. 5.1 108km WSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-20 08:28:42 UTC-05:00 57.1 km

  12. 4.6 91km WSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-20 07:14:37 UTC-05:00 33.6 km

  13. 4.9 63km WNW of Kandrian, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-20 03:56:40 UTC-05:00 62.4 km

  14. 5.0 88km WSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-20 03:24:29 UTC-05:00 34.9 km

  15. 4.6 106km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-20 03:10:20 UTC-05:00 79.7 km

  16. 5.1 126km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-19 23:23:13 UTC-05:00 35.1 km

  17. 5.7 117km WSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-19 23:17:34 UTC-05:00 28.2 km

  18. 4.6 113km WSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-19 21:26:48 UTC-05:00 25.1 km

  19. 4.8 66km W of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-19 20:02:14 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  20. 6.1 96km SSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-19 19:15:58 UTC-05:00 18.1 km

  21. 5.2 81km SSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-19 19:10:44 UTC-05:00 17.3 km

  22. 5.1 88km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-19 18:06:16 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  23. 4.7 95km WSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-19 17:33:26 UTC-05:00 35.8 km

  24. 4.8 92km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-19 16:31:38 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  25. 4.8 100km W of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-19 15:00:13 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  26. 4.9 127km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-19 14:16:18 UTC-05:00 9.4 km

  27. 5.1 134km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-19 13:11:25 UTC-05:00 73.3 km

  28. 5.3 109km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-19 12:55:19 UTC-05:00 26.5 km

  29. 5.3 105km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-19 12:45:11 UTC-05:00 39.8 km

  30. 5.1 65km W of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-19 12:19:50 UTC-05:00 87.5 km

  31. 5.2 125km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-19 11:56:14 UTC-05:00 47.4 km

  32. 5.2 129km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-19 11:49:44 UTC-05:00 80.3 km

  33. 4.9 126km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-19 11:41:47 UTC-05:00 77.6 km

  34. 4.8 149km WSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-19 10:52:57 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  35. 4.8 119km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-19 09:56:39 UTC-05:00 106.6 km

  36. 4.7 150km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-19 09:32:15 UTC-05:00 106.4 km

  37. 4.8 112km SSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-19 09:24:38 UTC-05:00 47.8 km

  38. 5.6 120km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-19 08:47:51 UTC-05:00 72.2 km

  39. 7.5 75km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-19 08:27:59 UTC-05:00 30.9 km

  40. 5.2 64km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-19 08:21:20 UTC-05:00 62.4 km

  41. 6.6 59km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-18 20:04:03 UTC-05:00 24.4 km

  42. 4.8 43km SSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-18 12:53:39 UTC-05:00 38.5 km

  43. 4.5 108km WNW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-17 16:09:08 UTC-05:00 104.6 km

  44. 4.5 31km E of Kimbe, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-17 13:06:44 UTC-05:00 142.0 km

  45. 4.8 97km SSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-16 17:43:27 UTC-05:00 80.1 km

  46. 5.4 76km WSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-16 15:00:06 UTC-05:00 38.9 km

  47. 4.8 76km S of Kokopo, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-16 11:07:52 UTC-05:00 54.8 km

  48. 5.3 155km SSE of Taron, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-15 14:16:16 UTC-05:00 47.2 km

  49. 4.5 127km NNE of Lae, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-15 06:22:34 UTC-05:00 191.8 km

  50. 4.7 58km WSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-14 14:45:55 UTC-05:00 55.0 km

  51. 4.6 103km WNW of Kandrian, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-13 21:42:01 UTC-05:00 119.0 km

  52. 4.7 93km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-13 16:49:04 UTC-05:00 39.8 km

  53. 5.3 78km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-13 08:19:19 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  54. 4.7 42km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-13 04:12:07 UTC-05:00 86.4 km

  55. 4.6 73km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-13 01:13:20 UTC-05:00 68.1 km

  56. 5.3 108km SSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-12 10:59:27 UTC-05:00 6.7 km

  57. 5.0 113km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-12 10:46:28 UTC-05:00 22.6 km

  58. 4.6 111km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-12 06:42:34 UTC-05:00 43.4 km

  59. 4.9 114km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-12 05:55:46 UTC-05:00 47.2 km

  60. 4.6 117km S of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-12 03:54:11 UTC-05:00 57.8 km

  61. 4.7 77km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-12 01:22:21 UTC-05:00 89.9 km

  62. 5.3 96km SSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-12 01:15:36 UTC-05:00 41.0 km

  63. 5.1 78km S of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-12 00:29:37 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  64. 6.1 92km SSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-12 00:24:25 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  65. 4.5 150km S of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-12 00:03:31 UTC-05:00 58.9 km

  66. 5.1 74km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-11 23:00:56 UTC-05:00 50.2 km

  67. 4.7 86km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-11 17:02:34 UTC-05:00 71.8 km

  68. 4.8 93km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-11 14:06:11 UTC-05:00 11.1 km

  69. 4.9 88km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-11 13:56:14 UTC-05:00 12.8 km

  70. 4.8 80km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-11 13:52:25 UTC-05:00 15.8 km

  71. 4.7 23km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-11 13:20:58 UTC-05:00 91.6 km

  72. 4.7 85km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-11 11:43:04 UTC-05:00 63.1 km

  73. 4.9 89km SSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-11 11:35:32 UTC-05:00 81.8 km

  74. 4.9 119km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-11 10:52:44 UTC-05:00 47.2 km

  75. 5.6 78km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-11 09:33:43 UTC-05:00 21.3 km

  76. 5.5 87km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-11 07:55:22 UTC-05:00 44.8 km

  77. 4.6 55km WSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-11 07:34:04 UTC-05:00 50.6 km

  78. 4.7 57km SSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-11 05:47:21 UTC-05:00 79.7 km

  79. 5.1 72km SSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-11 05:30:31 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  80. 4.7 92km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-11 04:35:57 UTC-05:00 65.7 km

  81. 4.8 63km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-11 03:39:04 UTC-05:00 44.3 km

  82. 5.2 83km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-11 03:31:48 UTC-05:00 52.6 km

  83. 5.1 75km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-11 03:23:46 UTC-05:00 45.9 km

  84. 6.5 78km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-11 03:16:48 UTC-05:00 39.4 km

  85. 7.1 57km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-11 02:07:21 UTC-05:00 50.0 km

  86. 4.9 138km S of Vanimo, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-10 13:19:14 UTC-05:00 73.3 km

  87. 5.1 259km ESE of Kulumadau, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-09 03:32:38 UTC-05:00 24.0 km

  88. 4.8 210km S of Kokopo, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-08 17:22:41 UTC-05:00 17.4 km

  89. 4.6 136km N of Kimbe, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-08 09:41:40 UTC-05:00 462.2 km

  90. 4.5 106km S of Taron, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-08 06:18:07 UTC-05:00 41.5 km

  91. 4.8 87km WSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-07 09:30:01 UTC-05:00 82.6 km

  92. 5.2 84km SSW of Aitape, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-04 22:34:37 UTC-05:00 62.6 km

  93. 4.7 109km SSW of Taron, Papua New Guinea 2014-04-02 10:00:03 UTC-05:00 50.4 km

  94. 5.6 100km NW of Kokoda, Papua New Guinea 2014-03-31 08:40:59 UTC-05:00 10.0 km

  95. 4.5 101km WNW of Kokoda, Papua New Guinea 2014-03-31 08:19:27 UTC-05:00 10.0 km

  96. 4.8 70km W of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-03-28 23:26:52 UTC-05:00 113.5 km

  97. 5.0 124km S of Taron, Papua New Guinea 2014-03-28 11:14:58 UTC-05:00 19.7 km

  98. 4.9 118km WNW of Rabaul, Papua New Guinea 2014-03-28 02:07:46 UTC-05:00 10.0 km

  99. 4.9 137km S of Taron, Papua New Guinea 2014-03-27 10:32:28 UTC-05:00 15.8 km

  100. 4.8 121km SW of Kokopo, Papua New Guinea 2014-03-27 06:52:37 UTC-05:00 133.1 km

  101. 5.1 67km WNW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea 2014-03-25 14:56:14 UTC-05:00 179.8 km

  102. 4.6 41km NW of Finschhafen, Papua New Guinea 2014-03-25 03:51:48 UTC-05:00 77.5 km

  103. 4.8 19km W of Aitape, Papua New Guinea 2014-03-24 06:19:00 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  104. 4.9 84km SSE of Kokopo, Papua New Guinea 2014-03-23 10:59:59 UTC-05:00 58.3 km

…..

 

M 6.1 – 96km SSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea

 

Earthquake location 7.167°S, 155.312°E

Event Time

  1. 2014-04-20 00:15:58 UTC
  2. 2014-04-20 10:15:58 UTC+10:00 at epicenter
  3. 2014-04-19 19:15:58 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

7.167°S 155.312°E depth=18.1km (11.2mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 96km (60mi) SSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea
  2. 108km (67mi) SSW of Arawa, Papua New Guinea
  3. 459km (285mi) SE of Kokopo, Papua New Guinea
  4. 569km (354mi) WNW of Honiara, Solomon Islands
  5. 599km (372mi) ESE of Kimbe, Papua New Guinea

…..

 

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

…..

 

M 7.5 – 75km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea

 

Earthquake location 6.720°S, 154.931°E

Event Time

  1. 2014-04-19 13:27:59 UTC
  2. 2014-04-19 23:27:59 UTC+10:00 at epicenter
  3. 2014-04-19 08:27:59 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

6.720°S 154.931°E depth=30.9km (19.2mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 75km (47mi) SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea
  2. 87km (54mi) SW of Arawa, Papua New Guinea
  3. 394km (245mi) SE of Kokopo, Papua New Guinea
  4. 545km (339mi) ESE of Kimbe, Papua New Guinea
  5. 629km (391mi) WNW of Honiara, Solomon Islands

…..

 

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

…..

M 6.6 – 59km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea

Earthquake location 6.679°S, 155.085°E

Event Time

  1. 2014-04-19 01:04:03 UTC
  2. 2014-04-19 11:04:03 UTC+10:00 at epicenter
  3. 2014-04-18 20:04:03 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

6.679°S 155.085°E depth=24.4km (15.2mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 59km (37mi) SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea
  2. 71km (44mi) SW of Arawa, Papua New Guinea
  3. 404km (251mi) SE of Kokopo, Papua New Guinea
  4. 561km (349mi) ESE of Kimbe, Papua New Guinea
  5. 616km (383mi) WNW of Honiara, Solomon Islands

 

…..

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

…..

M 6.1 – 92km SSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea

Earthquake location 7.116°S, 155.236°E

Event Time

  1. 2014-04-12 05:24:25 UTC
  2. 2014-04-12 15:24:25 UTC+10:00 at epicenter
  3. 2014-04-12 00:24:25 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

7.116°S 155.236°E depth=35.0km (21.7mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 92km (57mi) SSW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea
  2. 105km (65mi) SSW of Arawa, Papua New Guinea
  3. 449km (279mi) SE of Kokopo, Papua New Guinea
  4. 579km (360mi) WNW of Honiara, Solomon Islands
  5. 589km (366mi) ESE of Kimbe, Papua New Guinea

…..

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

…..

M 6.5 – 78km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea

Earthquake location 6.855°S, 155.017°E

Event Time

  1. 2014-04-11 08:16:48 UTC
  2. 2014-04-11 18:16:48 UTC+10:00 at epicenter
  3. 2014-04-11 03:16:48 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

6.855°S 155.017°E depth=39.4km (24.5mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 78km (48mi) SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea
  2. 91km (57mi) SW of Arawa, Papua New Guinea
  3. 411km (255mi) SE of Kokopo, Papua New Guinea
  4. 558km (347mi) ESE of Kimbe, Papua New Guinea
  5. 613km (381mi) WNW of Honiara, Solomon Islands

…..

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

…..

M 7.1 – 57km SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea

Earthquake location 6.625°S, 155.064°E

Event Time

  1. 2014-04-11 07:07:21 UTC
  2. 2014-04-11 18:07:21 UTC+11:00 at epicenter
  3. 2014-04-11 02:07:21 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

6.625°S 155.064°E depth=50.0km (31.1mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 57km (35mi) SW of Panguna, Papua New Guinea
  2. 69km (43mi) SW of Arawa, Papua New Guinea
  3. 399km (248mi) SE of Kokopo, Papua New Guinea
  4. 557km (346mi) ESE of Kimbe, Papua New Guinea
  5. 621km (386mi) WNW of Honiara, Solomon Islands

…..

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

…..

Tectonic Summary

The M 7.5 April 19, 2014 earthquake southwest of Panguna, Papua New Guinea, occurred as the result of thrust faulting on or near the subduction zone interface between the subducting Australia plate and overriding Pacific plate. At the location of the earthquake, the Australia plate moves towards the east-northeast at a velocity of 102 mm/yr with respect to the Pacific, and begins its subduction into the mantle beneath Bougainville Island at the New Britain Trench south of the earthquake. The moment tensor and depth of the event are consistent with thrust-type motion on the interface between these two plates. Note that at the location of the earthquake, some researchers divide the edge of the Australia plate into several microplates that take up the overall convergence between Australia and the Pacific. Here the Solomon Sea plate moves slightly faster and more northeasterly with respect to the Pacific plate than does Australia due to sea-floor spreading in the Woodlark Basin several hundred kilometers to the south of the April 19 earthquake.

This event is the latest in an ongoing sequence of seismicity in the same region over the past week, which began with M 7.1 and 6.5 earthquakes on April 11, just to the northeast and southeast of the April 19 earthquake, respectively. Over the intervening eight days, 45 earthquakes of M 4.5 or greater have occurred nearby, including a M 6.6 event about 12 hours before the April 19 earthquake.

In the Papua New Guinea region, the boundary between Australia and Pacific plates is very active seismically; 35 M 7+ events have occurred within 250 km of the April 19, 2014 earthquake over the past century. None are known to have caused any shaking-related fatalities. The largest was an M 8.0 175 km to the northwest of the April 19, 2014 earthquake, one of two M8+ earthquakes 140 km apart in July 1971. The M 8.1 Solomon Islands earthquake in April 2007, which caused a devastating tsunami, was 300 km southeast of the April 19, 2014 event.

 

…..

Enhanced by Zemanta

Earth Watch Report  -  Earthquakes

Solomon Islands - 71 EQs in the last 30 days  4.21.2014 photo SolomonIslands-71EQsinthelast30days4212014_zps6f2d3aac.png

71 earthquakes in map area

  1. 5.0 71km SSW of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-20 02:45:45 UTC-05:00 18.6 km

  2. 4.7 154km SE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-18 10:24:14 UTC-05:00 51.0 km

  3. 4.6 135km WSW of Lata, Solomon Islands 2014-04-18 08:02:51 UTC-05:00 42.4 km

  4. 5.1 129km WSW of Lata, Solomon Islands 2014-04-18 02:30:17 UTC-05:00 36.6 km

  5. 6.0 122km WSW of Lata, Solomon Islands 2014-04-17 23:13:12 UTC-05:00 10.0 km

  6. 5.0 135km SSE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-17 02:28:43 UTC-05:00 34.6 km

  7. 4.9 82km SSW of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-16 06:43:49 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  8. 4.7 78km SSW of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-16 05:24:45 UTC-05:00 37.4 km

  9. 4.6 126km SSE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-16 05:00:15 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  10. 4.6 149km SE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-15 16:08:21 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  11. 4.8 77km SSW of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-15 10:43:05 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  12. 4.7 152km SE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-14 19:30:02 UTC-05:00 22.1 km

  13. 4.8 82km SSW of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-14 19:24:32 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  14. 4.9 139km SE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-14 19:12:06 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  15. 5.3 142km SE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-14 19:07:53 UTC-05:00 27.3 km

  16. 5.1 133km SE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-14 18:56:30 UTC-05:00 32.4 km

  17. 4.7 155km SE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-14 18:51:59 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  18. 4.7 155km SE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-14 18:47:26 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  19. 4.8 77km SSW of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-14 16:55:53 UTC-05:00 35.1 km

  20. 4.7 121km S of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-14 15:44:19 UTC-05:00 33.6 km

  21. 4.9 72km SSW of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-14 11:51:27 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  22. 4.7 79km SSW of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-14 08:08:40 UTC-05:00 37.9 km

  23. 5.0 57km SW of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-14 05:47:19 UTC-05:00 34.0 km

  24. 4.8 77km SSW of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-14 03:09:58 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  25. 5.2 93km SSW of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-14 02:40:46 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  26. 4.6 118km S of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-14 02:31:06 UTC-05:00 27.6 km

  27. 4.8 80km S of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-14 02:16:34 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  28. 5.9 91km S of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-14 01:29:50 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  29. 5.0 142km SSE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 23:57:35 UTC-05:00 36.6 km

  30. 4.9 130km SSE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 22:30:17 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  31. 5.3 120km S of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 19:09:11 UTC-05:00 39.8 km

  32. 4.8 104km SSE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 16:13:33 UTC-05:00 14.9 km

  33. 4.6 74km SSW of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 14:41:35 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  34. 4.8 130km S of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 13:11:30 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  35. 4.8 112km SSW of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 10:24:01 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  36. 4.7 142km SE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 09:30:58 UTC-05:00 37.5 km

  37. 4.9 131km SE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 09:26:38 UTC-05:00 22.6 km

  38. 5.0 86km S of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 08:42:46 UTC-05:00 33.7 km

  39. 6.6 75km S of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 08:25:03 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  40. 5.6 84km S of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 08:12:21 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  41. 5.7 119km SSE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 07:46:43 UTC-05:00 31.4 km

  42. 7.4 111km S of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 07:36:18 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  43. 4.7 124km SE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 07:24:35 UTC-05:00 20.0 km

  44. 4.9 65km S of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 06:12:48 UTC-05:00 10.0 km

  45. 4.8 102km SSE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 05:54:28 UTC-05:00 10.0 km

  46. 4.7 82km S of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 05:26:24 UTC-05:00 34.9 km

  47. 5.1 95km S of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 05:09:49 UTC-05:00 8.1 km

  48. 5.0 87km S of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 05:05:39 UTC-05:00 21.1 km

  49. 5.2 69km SSE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 04:29:20 UTC-05:00 11.7 km

  50. 4.9 122km SE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 03:55:12 UTC-05:00 19.1 km

  51. 4.8 146km SE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 02:02:20 UTC-05:00 10.0 km

  52. 4.6 126km S of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 01:19:25 UTC-05:00 20.0 km

  53. 4.9 124km SSE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 00:59:24 UTC-05:00 14.4 km

  54. 4.7 89km SW of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 00:36:01 UTC-05:00 20.0 km

  55. 4.6 87km S of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-13 00:25:24 UTC-05:00 19.1 km

  56. 4.8 82km S of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-12 23:36:26 UTC-05:00 23.8 km

  57. 4.6 95km SSW of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-12 23:31:10 UTC-05:00 24.0 km

  58. 4.8 131km S of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-12 22:41:01 UTC-05:00 18.1 km

  59. 4.9 124km S of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-12 22:17:56 UTC-05:00 24.1 km

  60. 5.1 127km SSE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-12 18:52:14 UTC-05:00 7.0 km

  61. 4.9 129km SSE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-12 17:40:33 UTC-05:00 34.9 km

  62. 4.6 142km SSE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-12 17:18:51 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  63. 5.1 85km SSE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-12 16:39:05 UTC-05:00 43.1 km

  64. 4.6 124km SE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-12 16:34:39 UTC-05:00 38.1 km

  65. 5.0 149km SE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-12 16:17:05 UTC-05:00 35.0 km

  66. 4.7 72km S of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-12 16:11:02 UTC-05:00 35.3 km

  67. 4.9 123km SSE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-12 15:49:56 UTC-05:00 40.3 km

  68. 5.9 96km SSE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-12 15:24:46 UTC-05:00 26.8 km

  69. 7.6 100km SSE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-12 15:14:39 UTC-05:00 29.3 km

  70. 6.0 28km WSW of Kirakira, Solomon Islands 2014-04-04 06:40:32 UTC-05:00 63.8 km

  71. 5.1 196km W of Lata, Solomon Islands 2014-04-01 21:51:29 UTC-05:00 26.2 km

…..

 

M 6.0 – 122km WSW of Lata, Solomon Islands

 

Earthquake location 11.155°S, 164.806°E

Event Time

  1. 2014-04-18 04:13:12 UTC
  2. 2014-04-18 15:13:12 UTC+11:00 at epicenter
  3. 2014-04-17 23:13:12 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

11.155°S 164.806°E depth=10.0km (6.2mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 122km (76mi) WSW of Lata, Solomon Islands
  2. 547km (340mi) NNW of Luganville, Vanuatu
  3. 565km (351mi) ESE of Honiara, Solomon Islands
  4. 820km (510mi) NNW of Port-Vila, Vanuatu
  5. 1111km (690mi) NNW of We, New Caledonia

 

…..

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

……

 

M 6.6 – 75km S of Kirakira, Solomon Islands

Earthquake location 11.130°S, 162.037°E

 

Event Time

  1. 2014-04-13 13:25:03 UTC
  2. 2014-04-14 00:25:03 UTC+11:00 at epicenter
  3. 2014-04-13 08:25:03 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

11.130°S 162.037°E depth=35.0km (21.7mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 75km (47mi) S of Kirakira, Solomon Islands
  2. 295km (183mi) SE of Honiara, Solomon Islands
  3. 738km (459mi) NW of Luganville, Vanuatu
  4. 898km (558mi) SE of Arawa, Papua New Guinea
  5. 996km (619mi) NW of Port-Vila, Vanuatu

…..

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

…..

M 7.4 – 111km S of Kirakira, Solomon Islands

Earthquake location 11.451°S, 162.069°E

Event Time

  1. 2014-04-13 12:36:18 UTC
  2. 2014-04-13 23:36:18 UTC+11:00 at epicenter
  3. 2014-04-13 07:36:18 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

11.451°S 162.069°E depth=35.0km (21.7mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 111km (69mi) S of Kirakira, Solomon Islands
  2. 321km (199mi) SE of Honiara, Solomon Islands
  3. 713km (443mi) NW of Luganville, Vanuatu
  4. 922km (573mi) SE of Arawa, Papua New Guinea
  5. 967km (601mi) NW of Port-Vila, Vanuatu

…..

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

…..

M 7.6 – 100km SSE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands

Earthquake location 11.315°S, 162.211°E

Event Time

  1. 2014-04-12 20:14:39 UTC
  2. 2014-04-13 07:14:39 UTC+11:00 at epicenter
  3. 2014-04-12 15:14:39 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

11.315°S 162.211°E depth=29.3km (18.2mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 100km (62mi) SSE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands
  2. 323km (201mi) SE of Honiara, Solomon Islands
  3. 711km (442mi) NW of Luganville, Vanuatu
  4. 925km (575mi) SE of Arawa, Papua New Guinea
  5. 968km (601mi) NW of Port-Vila, Vanuatu

…..

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

…..

M 6.0 – 28km WSW of Kirakira, Solomon Islands

Earthquake location 10.530°S, 161.672°E

Event Time

  1. 2014-04-04 11:40:32 UTC
  2. 2014-04-04 22:40:32 UTC+11:00 at epicenter
  3. 2014-04-04 06:40:32 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

10.530°S 161.672°E depth=63.8km (39.6mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 28km (17mi) WSW of Kirakira, Solomon Islands
  2. 224km (139mi) ESE of Honiara, Solomon Islands
  3. 813km (505mi) NW of Luganville, Vanuatu
  4. 827km (514mi) SE of Arawa, Papua New Guinea
  5. 1072km (666mi) NW of Port-Vila, Vanuatu

…..

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

…..

Tectonic Summary

The April 13, 2014 M 7.4 Solomon Islands earthquake occurred as the result of nearly pure reverse faulting on an approximately east-west oriented structure near the oceanic trench that marks the plate boundary between the Australia and Pacific plates. At the location of the earthquake, the Australia Plate converges with and slips past the Pacific plate at a rate of 95 mm/yr. The April 13 earthquake occurred along a portion of this plate boundary that transitions from thrust to transform tectonics between the New Britain Trench to the northwest and the New Hebrides Trench farther east. The earthquake occurred about 110 km SSE of Kirakira, Solomon Islands.
The April 13 earthquake occurred less than 24 hours and approximately 20 km to the southwest of a M 7.7 strike-slip earthquake on April 12, 2014. While the April 12 strike-slip earthquake likely represented Australia:Pacific plate boundary faulting, the April 13 earthquake is located south of the plate boundary at a depth of approximately 35 km, and as such may represent tearing of the Australia plate to accommodate the abrupt change in Australian plate interaction with the Pacific plate (subduction to the north and west; left-lateral translation to the east).
The region of the April 12 earthquake is very seismically active, with 28 earthquakes of M6+ occurring within 100 km and 62 events of M7+ within 500 km since 1900. The majority of these earthquakes are grouped to the northwest around the Solomon Islands and to the east near Vanuatu and the Santa Cruz Islands. Notable earthquake within 100 km include a doublet of M7.0 events in November 1978, events of M7.1 in 1931 and 1937, and an M7.2 in 1910. The most recent local event prior to the April 12 earthquake was an M6.0 on April 4, 2014 94 km to the NW. The April 12 earthquake also occurred about 950 km to the SE of an earthquake sequence south of Bougainville Island, Papua New Guinea that began with an M6.1 on April 11, 2014. On February 6, 2013, an M8.0 struck offshore of the Santa Cruz Islands about 340 km east of the April 12 event. The 2013 earthquake triggered a regional tsunami of about 1.5 m and was followed by aftershocks of M7.0 and two of M7.1.

 

 

…..

Enhanced by Zemanta
OZONE NEWS

Plugging an ozone hole


by Staff Writers
Boston MA (SPX) Apr 17, 2014


File image.

Since the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, scientists, policymakers, and the public have wondered whether we might someday see a similarly extreme depletion of ozone over the Arctic.

But a new MIT study finds some cause for optimism: Ozone levels in the Arctic haven’t yet sunk to the extreme lows seen in Antarctica, in part because international efforts to limit ozone-depleting chemicals have been successful.

“While there is certainly some depletion of Arctic ozone, the extremes of Antarctica so far are very different from what we find in the Arctic, even in the coldest years,” says Susan Solomon, the Ellen Swallow Richards Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Science at MIT, and lead author of a paper published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Frigid temperatures can spur ozone loss because they create prime conditions for the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. When sunlight hits these clouds, it sparks a reaction between chlorine from chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), human-made chemicals once used for refrigerants, foam blowing, and other applications – ultimately destroying ozone.

A success story of science and policy
After the ozone-attacking properties of CFCs were discovered in the 1980s, countries across the world agreed to phase out their use as part of the 1987 Montreal Protocol treaty. While CFCs are no longer in use, those emitted years ago remain in the atmosphere.

 

Read More Here

 

…..

 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

An aerial view of clouds over a mountain range in Greenland.

Courtesy of Michael Studinger/NASA Earth Observatory

Full Screen

Courtesy of Michael Studinger/NASA Earth Observatory

 

.

An Arctic ozone hole? Not quite

MIT researchers find that the extremes in Antarctic ozone holes have not been matched in the Arctic.

Audrey Resutek | Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change
April 14, 2014

Since the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, scientists, policymakers, and the public have wondered whether we might someday see a similarly extreme depletion of ozone over the Arctic.

But a new MIT study finds some cause for optimism: Ozone levels in the Arctic haven’t yet sunk to the extreme lows seen in Antarctica, in part because international efforts to limit ozone-depleting chemicals have been successful.

“While there is certainly some depletion of Arctic ozone, the extremes of Antarctica so far are very different from what we find in the Arctic, even in the coldest years,” says Susan Solomon, the Ellen Swallow Richards Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Science at MIT, and lead author of a paper published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Frigid temperatures can spur ozone loss because they create prime conditions for the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. When sunlight hits these clouds, it sparks a reaction between chlorine from chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), human-made chemicals once used for refrigerants, foam blowing, and other applications — ultimately destroying ozone.

‘A success story of science and policy’

After the ozone-attacking properties of CFCs were discovered in the 1980s, countries across the world agreed to phase out their use as part of the 1987 Montreal Protocol treaty. While CFCs are no longer in use, those emitted years ago remain in the atmosphere. As a result, atmospheric concentrations have peaked and are now slowly declining, but it will be several decades before CFCs are totally eliminated from the environment — meaning there is still some risk of ozone depletion caused by CFCs.

 

Read More Here

 

…..

OZONE NEWS

NASA Pinpoints Causes of 2011 Arctic Ozone Hole


by Maria-Jose Vinas for NASA’s Earth Science News
Greenbelt MD (SPX) Mar 13, 2013


Maps of ozone concentrations over the Arctic come from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on NASA’s Aura satellite. The left image shows March 19, 2010, and the right shows the same date in 2011. March 2010 had relatively high ozone, while March 2011 has low levels. Credit: NASA/Goddard.

A combination of extreme cold temperatures, man-made chemicals and a stagnant atmosphere were behind what became known as the Arctic ozone hole of 2011, a new NASA study finds. Even when both poles of the planet undergo ozone losses during the winter, the Arctic’s ozone depletion tends to be milder and shorter-lived than the Antarctic’s.

This is because the three key ingredients needed for ozone-destroying chemical reactions -chlorine from man-made chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), frigid temperatures and sunlight- are not usually present in the Arctic at the same time: the northernmost latitudes are generally not cold enough when the sun reappears in the sky in early spring. Still, in 2011, ozone concentrations in the Arctic atmosphere were about 20 percent lower than its late winter average.

The new study shows that, while chlorine in the Arctic stratosphere was the ultimate culprit of the severe ozone loss of winter of 2011, unusually cold and persistent temperatures also spurred ozone destruction. Furthermore, uncommon atmospheric conditions blocked wind-driven transport of ozone from the tropics, halting the seasonal ozone resupply until April.

“You can safely say that 2011 was very atypical: In over 30 years of satellite records, we hadn’t seen any time where it was this cold for this long,” said Susan E. Strahan, an atmospheric scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., and main author of the new paper, which was recently published in the Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres.

“Arctic ozone levels were possibly the lowest ever recorded, but they were still significantly higher than the Antarctic’s,” Strahan said. “There was about half as much ozone loss as in the Antarctic and the ozone levels remained well above 220 Dobson units, which is the threshold for calling the ozone loss a ‘hole’ in the Antarctic – so the Arctic ozone loss of 2011 didn’t constitute an ozone hole.”

The majority of ozone depletion in the Arctic happens inside the so-called polar vortex: a region of fast-blowing circular winds that intensify in the fall and isolate the air mass within the vortex, keeping it very cold.

 

Read More Here

 

…..

Enhanced by Zemanta

Cyclone threatens to disrupt search for missing MH370

April 21, 2014

Australian Navy officer Morgan Macdonald stands in a rigid hull inflatable boat as he observes markers dropped from a Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) P3K Orion, after an object was sighted in the southern Indian Ocean. – Reuters pic, April 21, 2014.Australian Navy officer Morgan Macdonald stands in a rigid hull inflatable boat as he observes markers dropped from a Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) P3K Orion, after an object was sighted in the southern Indian Ocean. – Reuters pic, April 21, 2014.A tropical cyclone was threatening to hamper the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight today, as a submarine drone neared the end of its mission scouring the southern Indian Ocean sea bed with still no sign of wreckage.

The search for flight MH370, which vanished on March 8 with 239 people on board, has narrowed to a 10 sq km patch of sea floor about 2,000 km west of the Australian city of Perth.

Search authorities and the Australian and Malaysian governments have said a series of sonar signals, or “pings”, traced to the area may have emanated from the plane’s “black box” and present the most credible lead as to its whereabouts.

However no pings have been detected in almost two weeks and authorities now fear that, with the flight data recorder’s battery several weeks past its expected expiry date, the black box may not emit further signals.

A US Navy remote controlled submarine, the Bluefin-21, was on its ninth mission scanning the largely unmapped stretch of sea bed where the pings are believed to have come from, with still no trace found, Australian search officials said today.

“Bluefin-21 has searched approximately two-thirds of the focused underwater search area to date. No contacts of interest have been found to date,” the Joint Agency Coordination Centre said in a statement.

 

Read More Here

Enhanced by Zemanta
Land contaminated by waste from factories in Lanzhou, Gansu province. (File photo/Xinhua)

Land contaminated by waste from factories in Lanzhou, Gansu province. (File photo/Xinhua)

…..

  • China Begins Soil Pollution Clean-up amid Doubt over Funding

    BEIJING (Reuters) – China has announced its first pilot projects to treat metal pollution in soil and prevent farmland from further contamination, but critics say the government’s overall efforts are underfunded and inefficient.

    The Ministry of Finance will subsidize soil pollution prevention and treatment in three cities in the central province of Hunan, state media reported, as pilot efforts to halt developments that have rendered 3.33 million hectares (8 million acres) of Chinese farmland too polluted to grow crops on.

    Hunan was the source of rice containing dangerous levels of toxic cadmium sold in the southern city of Guangzhou last year.

    Under the plan, the Ministry of Agriculture will monitor and control metal residues to prevent them from leaking into the soil, while the rice crop will be replaced with cotton and other non-edible products.

    But government efforts to protect agricultural and urban soil fall massively short of what is needed, said Lan Hong, a professor at Renmin University’s School of Environmental and Natural Resources.

    In the current five-year plan, the Ministry of Finance has budgeted 30 billion yuan ($4.8 billion) in spending on soil pollution prevention efforts, but Lan said it would cost at least 140 billion yuan, nearly five times above the budget, to solve the problem.

    “The funding is based on data from the Ministry of Environmental Protection, but it is at the lower end of estimates. Some of the environmental damage will only be exposed after many years,” Lan told Reuters.

     

    Read More Here

     

    …..

    Plants used to weed out soil pollution

    Chinese scientists have developed soil remediation technologies to prepare for large-scale applications.

    The technologies focus on using plants to absorb heavy metal contaminants in soil.

    The technologies were developed by the Center for Environmental Remediation of the Institute of Geographic Sciences and Resources Research under the Chinese Academy of Sciences, which began research 10 years ago.

    Soil contamination is serious in China, with large areas of cropland polluted, said Lei Mei, a professor at the center.

    Soil remediation technologies have been applied on 133 hectares of land in the Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region, Henan, Yunnan and Hunan provinces and Beijing on a trial basis, and Lei said she believes the technologies will have “good application prospects”.

    A report from the Ministry of Environmental Protection on Thursday showed that about 19.4 per cent of farmland in China was polluted, according to Xinhua News Agency.

    “The publication of the survey result is a milestone for soil remediation in China,” Lei said.

    Read More Here

     

    …..

    Enhanced by Zemanta

    Beijing still not releasing soil pollution data: Xinhua

    • Xinhua
    Technical staff examine soil contaminated by heavy metal pollution. (File photo/Huang Chih-liang)

    Technical staff examine soil contaminated by heavy metal pollution. (File photo/Huang Chih-liang)

    China’s Ministry of Environmental Protection will not issue data related to soil pollution for the time being but will discuss the situation after an in-depth investigation, the ministry confirmed on Thursday. The ministry said it will be difficult to investigate soil pollution nationwide, adding that it will conduct further investigations in heavily polluted areas.

    In January, Beijing lawyer Dong Zhengwei sent an application to the ministry asking it to issue soil pollution data, as well as create detailed measures to handle it.

    The ministry said in February that the data is a state secret and refused to issue it. Dong was not satisfied and sent a second request. In response the ministry said soil pollution is still being investigated and related data remains a state secret, adding that data will be released after further evaluation. After news of Dong’s requests spread online, many people began to wonder just how polluted the country’s soil is.

    Ma Jun, head of the Institute of Public and Environmental Affairs, said in an interview with the Legal Daily that polluted soil may affect public health via food, crops and underground water.

    “Soil pollution is related to public health. Therefore, the public should have the right to be informed about the situation,” Ma said.

     

    Read More Here

     

    …..

    FARM NEWS

    China says massive area of its soil polluted


    by Staff Writers
    Beijing (AFP) April 17, 2014


    More dead pigs found in China river: report
    Beijing (AFP) April 17, 2014 – At least 170 dead pigs have been found in a Chinese river, state media reported Thursday — the latest in a string of similar incidents that have raised fears over food safety.
    The animals were found floating in a tributary of China’s second-longest waterway, the Yellow River, in northwestern Qinghai province, the official Xinhua news agency said.The grim discovery follows a series of scandals involving dead pigs in Chinese rivers. Last year 16,000 carcasses were found drifting through the main waterway of the commercial hub of Shanghai.In Qinghai — the furthest west such an incident has been reported — “the source of the dead pigs is still under investigation,” Xinhua said, citing local authorities.Industry analysts say sick pigs are sometimes dumped in rivers by farmers hoping to avoid paying the costs of disposing of the animals by other means.Around 500 dead pigs are recovered every month from a Chinese reservoir in the southwestern province of Sichuan, state-run media reported in March.

    Authorities also found 157 dead pigs last month in a river in central Jiangxi province.

    China is a major producer of pork, which surveys have found to be the country’s most popular meat.

     

    A huge area of China’s soil covering more than twice the size of Spain is estimated to be polluted, the government said Thursday, announcing findings of a survey previously kept secret.

    Of about 6.3 million square kilometres (2.4 million square miles) of soil surveyed — roughly two thirds of China’s total area — 16.1 percent is thought to be polluted, the environmental protection ministry said in a report.

    The study, which appeared on its website, blamed mining and farming practices among other causes.

    “The national soil pollution situation is not positive,” the ministry said, adding that more than 19 percent of the farmland which was surveyed is polluted.

    The ministry last year described the results of its soil pollution survey as a state secret and refused to release the results, a move which incensed environmental campaigners.

    The government has come under increasing pressure in recent years to take action to improve the environment, with large parts of the country repeatedly blanketed in thick smog and waterways and land polluted.

     

    Read More Here

     

    …..

    The American Interest

    Filth to Table

    Relentless Pollution is Poisoning China’s Food, Soil

    © Getty Images

    In many parts of China, officials are caught between two competing priorities: industrial development and food production. Most often, officials’ prime concern is industrial development—characterized by factories and mining, usually—since it is the bigger driver of economic growth. But, predictably, unfettered industrial development results in extremely poor conditions for food production. And it’s getting worse. Much worse. An article in yesterday’s New York Times has some sobering statistics.

    An alarming glimpse of official findings came on Monday, when a vice minister of land and resources, Wang Shiyuan, said at a news conference in Beijing that eight million acres of China’s farmland, equal to the size of Maryland, had become so polluted that planting crops on it “should not be allowed.” [...]

    One-sixth of China’s arable land — nearly 50 million acres — suffers from soil pollution, according to a book published this year by the Ministry of Environmental Protection. The book, “Soil Pollution and Physical Health,” said that more than 13 million tons of crops harvested each year were contaminated with heavy metals, and that 22 million acres of farmland were affected by pesticides.

    The result of farming on polluted land is unsurprising: poisoned food. 155 batches of rice collected from markets and restaurants in Guangdong Province in May were found to have excess levels of cadmium.

     

    Read More Here

    …..

    Enhanced by Zemanta

    Daily International News

    Rose Komono poses for a picture at a health clinic after overcoming the Ebola virus, in Gueckedou, Guinea, April 3, 2014.

    Rose Komono poses for a picture at a health clinic after overcoming the Ebola virus, in Gueckedou, Guinea, April 3, 2014.

    VOA News
    The World Health Organization says the death toll from the Ebola outbreak in West Africa has risen to at least 135.In a Thursday statement the WHO says Guinea’s health ministry had reported a total of 122 deaths, while 13 deaths had been reported by Liberian health officials.The WHO says officials are investigating more than 200 suspected or confirmed cases of the virus in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

    Enhanced by Zemanta

    KING 5.com

     

    Climate change increasing massive wildfires in West

    Climate change increasing massive wildfires in West

    Credit: Draysen Brooks Bechard

    Wildfire near Wenatchee, 2013.

    by Doyle Rice, USA TODAY

    Posted on April 19, 2014 at 11:06 AM

    Updated today at 11:09 AM

     

    Massive wildfires are on the increase in the Western US due to rising temperatures and worsening drought from climate change, and the trend could continue in the decades to come, new research suggests.

    Overall, the number of large wildfires increased by a rate of seven fires a year from 1984 to 2011, while the total area damaged by fire increased at a rate of nearly 90,000 acres per year, according to the study, published this week in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union (AGU).

    The study comes against the backdrop of what could to be a disastrous year for fires in the West, especially drought-plagued California, which even saw fires in the normally quiet month of January.

    Though relatively calm this week, “Expect dry and windy conditions to develop over the Southwest Tuesday and Wednesday,” according to a forecast Friday from the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise. By May, “Above normal significant fire potential will expand over portions of Southern, Central and Northern California,” the NIFC predicted earlier this month.

     

    Read More Here

    Enhanced by Zemanta
    ENERGY TECH

    Alberta investing in CCS for oil sands


    by Daniel J. Graeber
    Edmonton, Alberta (UPI) Apr 18, 2013


    Canada gives OK to West Coast LNG terminal
    Calgary, Alberta (UPI) Apr 17, 2013 – The approval of an export license for Triton LNG Ltd. from a port in British Columbia gives Canadian energy companies access to new markets, a regulator said.
    Canada’s National Energy Board gave approval for a 25-year application to send about 320 million cubic feet of liquefied natural gas per day from a port to be located either at Kitimat or Prince Rupert, British Columbia.NEB said the approval is in response to the glut of natural gas in North America.

    “One of the major impacts of this increase is lower demand for Canadian gas in traditional gas markets in the United States and eastern Canada,” it said in a statement Wednesday. “As a result, the Canadian gas industry is seeking to access overseas gas markets.”

    Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper has sought to add a layer of diversity to an energy export economy that depends on the United States. Asian markets are among the world’s largest consumers of LNG and Harper recently signed a free-trade deal with South Korea.

    NEB said the terminal for LNG hasn’t been constructed yet and needs further regulatory approval before it can begin.

     

    The provincial government in Alberta, Canada, said it set aside more than $1 billion for carbon storage and storage facilities for oil sands projects.

    Provincial Energy Minister Diana McQueen said two projects tied to the oil sands sector would be able to store more than 2.7 million tons of carbon dioxide each year.

    “With [these projects], we are showing the world we take the responsible development of our resources seriously and we’re becoming a world leader in CCS technology,” she said in a statement Thursday.

    Alberta holds some of the largest oil deposits in the world at its Athabasca deposit, located in the east of the province.

    The heavier grade of crude oil found there is seen as a threat to the environment because it’s carbon-intensive to produce.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ….

     

    Read More Here

     

    …..

    An open-pit mine in the oil sands, Fort McMurray, Alberta

    Pictures: Satellite Views of Canada’s Oil Sands Over Time

    …..

    Scientists Find 7,300-Mile Mercury Contamination ‘Bullseye’ Around Canadian Tar Sands

    By Emily Atkin December 30, 2013 at 1:45 pm Updated: December 30, 2013 at 1:31 pm

    Scientists Find 7,300-Mile Mercury Contamination ‘Bullseye’ Around Canadian Tar Sands

    Just one week after Al Jazeera discovered that regulatory responsibility for Alberta, Canada’s controversial tar sands would be handed over to a fossil-fuel funded corporation, federal scientists have found that the area’s viscous petroleum deposits are surrounded by a nearly 7,500-square-mile ring of mercury.

    Canadian government scientists have found that levels of mercury — a potent neurotoxin which has been found to cause severe birth defects and brain damage — around the region’s vast tar sand operations are up to 16 times higher than regular levels for the region. The findings, presented by Environment Canada researcher Jane Kirk at an international toxicology conference, showed that the 7,500 miles contaminated are “currently impacted by airborne Hg (mercury) emissions originating from oilsands developments.”

    The Canadian government touts Alberta’s oil sands as the third-largest proven crude oil reserve in the world, next to Saudi Arabia and Venezuela. The region’s heavy crude oil is mixed with clay, bitumen, and a good deal of sand — hence the name “oil sands.” This makes for a unique and energy-intensive extraction process that some scientists say produces three times the greenhouse gas emissions of conventionally produced oil. Environment Canada has said it expects production emissions from tar sands to hit 104 million tonnes of CO2 by 2020 under current expansion plans.

     

    Read More Herer

     

    …..

    Enhanced by Zemanta
    Follow

    Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

    Join 1,503 other followers