Category: Alternative Energy


Did the Government Give Industrial Hemp a Pass to Clean Up Radiation in the States?

Christina Sarich

NationofChange / News Analysis

Published: Friday 14 February 2014

Hemp has numerous uses and could replace many crops that require heavy irrigation and pesticides, but the most interesting fact about hemp is that it “eats” radiation.

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Activists have been shouting they want an end to GMO foods for more than a decade now, and Cannabis Sattiva L. supporters have been at it for even longer, so why has the US government finally given farmers the right to legally grow industrial hemp, the non-hallucinatory, sister plant of medical marijuana?

It is safe to say that industrialized hemp should have been legalized years ago. With THC levels so low, you would have to smoke more of it than Snoop Dogg to get ‘high’ – and that’s a lot of Cannabis, it is ridiculous that it was classified as a drug at all. It has numerous uses and could replace many crops that require heavy irrigation and pesticides, like cotton, for example. Here’s the most interesting fact though – hemp plants ‘eat’ radiation.

When the Chernobyl Nuclear Plant Reactor 4 accident caused severe radioactive contamination in 1986, families within a 30-kilometer area of the site had to be evacuated. Radioactive contamination was later found at 100 kilometers from the accident site, and Fukushima radiation levels are still to be determined, with the Japanese government planning on dumping their overflowing radiated water tanks into the Pacific as we speak.

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| February 20, 2014 11:58 am

There’s clearly a lot of honor in being named the first offshore wind farm in the U.S., and developers keep that in mind with each deal they strike and announcement they make.

In the past two weeks, Deepwater Wind announced deals that it believes keeps its Block Island Wind Farm “on target to become the nation’s first offshore wind farm.” First, the Providence, RI-based firm signed a deal with the French Alstom Group for five, 6-megawatt (MW) turbines that will power the farm to be constructed on waters near Rhode Island’s Block Island. Next, Deep Wind tapped Oslo, Norway-based Fred. Olsen Windcarrier to provide the vessel for the farm’s turbine installation.

Video screenshot: Deepwater Wind

Video screenshot: Deepwater Wind

“This agreement represents a giant leap forward for the Block Island Wind Farm, and the start of turbine construction just last month marked a major project milestone,” said Deepwater Wind CEO Jeffrey Grybowski.

Alstom’s 6-MW Haliade 150 turbines are 589 feet tall. The company has 2.3 gigawatts of offshore wind farm substations delivered or under construction around the world.

The 30-MW Block Island Wind Farm will generate more than 125,000 MW hours annually, enough to power about 17,000 homes. The energy will be exported to the mainland electric grid through a 21-mile, bi-directional Block Island transmission system that includes a submarine cable proposed to make landfall in Narragansett, RI.

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A Heavy Duty $6 DIY Rocket Stove

Cook Different Cook Different

Published on Dec 10, 2013

In this video I layout a pretty simple process for building a rocket stove that will you a lifetime and uses a very small amount of fuel (wood, sticks, pinecones, etc) to cook your meals with. Be sure to follow me on Facebook at http://facebook.com/cookingdifferent

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The “4 Block” Rocket Stove! – DIY Rocket Stove – (Concrete/Cinder Block Rocket Stove) – Simple DIY

desertsun02

Published on Nov 9, 2013

How to make a “FOUR BLOCK” Rocket Stove! Easy DIY. Four concrete blocks is all it takes to make it!. Cost $5.16. video shows you how to put it together. the stove funnels all its heat up under the bottom of the pan. uses very little fuel. fueled by small sticks, twigs and leaves. cooks great. wind and rain resistant

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The “6 Block” Rocket Stove! DIY – “DUAL BURNER” Rocket Stove! (Concrete Block Rocket Stove) DIY

desertsun02

Published on Nov 17, 2013

Homemade “6 Block” Rocket Stove. DIY “Dual Burner” Rocket Stove is made from only 6 blocks!. similar to the 4 block rocket stove. uses the same blocks. (just add 2 “Half Blocks”). great for emergency/SHTF or everyday use

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The Do It Yourself World The Do It Yourself World

Published on Oct 18, 2013

Simple biomass briquettes you can make as a survival fuel source. Read full article: http://www.thediyworld.com/blog/?p=1469

With a simple caulk gun, some pvc tubing and a bit of hardware you can make a biomass briquette press. I show you how in a previous video. The link to that article can be found on the page above.

With access to a source of paper you can make your own survival heating and cooking fuel with ease. All you need is a bunch of shredded paper. If you have a paper shredder then you can shred paper yourself to use for biomass briquettes. You can also make a paper shredder if needed. Or you can shred paper by hand in an emergency.

For people living in the cities where wood as a fuel source is scarce this is a great survival skill to have. After the recent hurricanes on the East Coast many people were left without power for weeks or even months. People had not light, heat or access to clean drinking water.

Knowing how to make biomass briquettes can save your life and make a grid down situation more bearable.

If you live in the city it may be a good idea to have homemade biomass briquettes on hand already just in case of emergency.

You can use your biomass briquettes in a charcoal grill (outdoors only), in a wood stove or even an empty paint can in an emergency.

In a later article I will show you how to use a mix of paper and natural materials such as leaves to make biomass briquettes.

This project is presented by The Do It Yourself World.
http://www.TheDIYworld.com

Experiments and projects in off grid living, alternate energy, survival, hiking and more.

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| January 3, 2014 3:27 pm

 

The Earth Policy Institute listed the Cape Wind project as one of three possibilities for the first offshore wind farm in the U.S., and a recent agreement makes that even more likely.

 

Siemens signed a contract before New Year’s that will allow the German company to supply the $2.6 billion Cape Wind farm with 130 turbines for a potential output of 468 megawatts (MW), according to My Wind Power System. That amount is enough to power 75 percent of Cape Cod and the Islands.

 

In addition to the 3.6-MW turbines, Siemens will also provide an offshore electric service platform (ESP), maintenance and service for the first 15 years of commercial operation.

 

An artist's rendering of the Cape Wind Farm and a boat tour of the farm. Photo credit: Cape Wind

An artist’s rendering of the Cape Wind Farm and a boat tour of the farm. Photo credit: Cape Wind

 

“This is a significant milestone for this project and we’re excited about it,” Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick said. “Massachusetts will be a pioneer in the emerging offshore wind industry, which brings with it both clean energy and good jobs.”

 

According to the U.S. Department of Energy, the nation’s coastal regions have the potential to host more than 4.1 million MW. Shallow waters along the eastern seaboard alone could host could host 530,000 MW, capable of covering more than 40 percent of the country’s electricity generation.

 

Cape Wind received local, state and federal permitting in 2009 and 2010. The project was granted the first U.S. commercial offshore wind lease in October 2010. Power purchase agreements were met with National Grid and NSTAR between 2010 and 2012.

 

Siemens will subcontract the ESP to Cianbro, which will fabricate it at its Maine facility. The ESP will be located in the middle of the offshore wind farm site on Horseshoe Shoal in Nantucket Sound. It will transform the voltage of the power produced by Siemens’ turbines.

 

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(C) Desert Rose Creations/Family Survival Protocol  2013Ethanol Sign 2 photo ethanolsign2_zps0d43f94d.jpg

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The Associated Press is running a terrific and long investigative article, “The Secret, Dirty Cost of Obama’s Green Power Push,” on the environmental downsides of the ethanol fuel mandate. From the AP…

…the ethanol era has proven far more damaging to the environment than politicians promised and much worse than the government admits today.

As farmers rushed to find new places to plant corn, they wiped out millions of acres of conservation land, destroyed habitat and polluted water supplies, an Associated Press investigation found.

Five million acres of land set aside for conservation — more than Yellowstone, Everglades and Yosemite National Parks combined — have vanished on Obama’s watch.

Landowners filled in wetlands. They plowed into pristine prairies, releasing carbon dioxide that had been locked in the soil.

Sprayers pumped out billions of pounds of fertilizer, some of which seeped into drinking water, contaminated rivers and worsened the huge dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico where marine life can’t survive.

The consequences are so severe that environmentalists and many scientists have now rejected corn-based ethanol as bad environmental policy. But the Obama administration stands by it, highlighting its benefits to the farming industry rather than any negative impact.

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MLive

ice lighthouse.JPG
Ice on Lake Michigan is a major concern for those exploring wind turbines on the Great Lakes as this winter scene from Muskegon shows. (Chronicle file photo)

By Dave Alexander | dalexan1@mlive.com

on October 22, 2013 at 6:45 AM, updated October 22, 2013 at 7:27 AM

MUSKEGON, MI – Ice on Lake Michigan is apparently not a “show stopper” for those exploring wind turbine farms on the Great Lakes.

That is the initial conclusion of University of Michigan marine engineer Dale G. Karr based upon his work for the U.S. Department of Energy studying Great Lakes ice and its impact on wind turbine towers.

“I have not found ice to be a show stopper but our research will be useful in determining that question,” Karr told a lecture audience Monday, Oct. 21 at the Grand Valley State University Michigan Alternative and Renewable Energy Center in Muskegon.

That is not to say that lake ice isn’t an issue, far from it.

ProfessorKarrMAREC.JPGUniversity of Michigan Professor Dale G. Karr makes a point Monday, Oct. 21 at a lecture on Great Lakes ice and wind turbines at the Grand Valley State University Michigan Alternative and Renewable Energy Center in Muskegon.

“The Department of Energy is supporting this research to see if there is a show stopper,” Karr said. “Ice is a major issue if not the major issue for wind energy on the Great Lakes. The answer will start to emerge next spring when we will determine the designs and costs.”

Already offshore wind production is three times the cost of onshore wind farms such as the Consumers Energy Lake Winds Energy Park now producing electricity in Mason County south of Ludington, according to MAREC Director Arn Boezaart. Factoring in the cost of engineering wind tower protection against the ice is just one more reason that Great Lakes wind farms are likely more than a decade away, if the political will for such installations ever materializes, he said.

Karr said that the United States has taken an economic and technological back seat to Europe – especially Germany – and now both China and Japan in exploring, developing and deploying offshore wind. With the controversy of offshore wind in the United States for more than a decade, no offshore wind turbine has been installed although seven test projects are underway with federal funding.

“Europe is ahead of us probably a decade or so,” Karr said of offshore wind. “The German government is making offshore wind development the equivalent of our 1960s moon program. We are not the world leaders (in offshore wind) but now playing catch up.”

As the University of Michigan’s world-renowned department of marine engineering and naval architecture decided several years ago to delve into offshore wind technology questions, Karr began to study the effects of ice – an expertise he has obtained through studying oil and natural gas rigs in Arctic waters.

“We always get the question, why put wind turbines in the Great Lakes when there is ice?” Karr said of his research.

 

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A group of miners pose for a photograph inside of an excavation corridor at Zofiowka coal mine in Jastrzebie Zdroj, southern Poland April 3, 2013. REUTERS/Peter Andrews

 

 

OSLO | Fri Oct 25, 2013 6:09am EDT

(Reuters) – Poland could halve its demand for coal by 2030 with a shift to renewable energies that would end its image as a laggard in European Union efforts to slow climate change, a study showed on Friday.

The report, by researchers in Germany and Poland, renewable energy groups and environmental group Greenpeace, included a foreword by ex-Polish Environment Minister Maciej Nowicki who called it a “feasible, realistic scenario”.

It estimated that Poland, which now generates 90 percent of its electricity from coal, could create 100,000 jobs with a shift to wind, hydro, biomass, geothermal and solar power by 2030.

The scenario would require investment of $264 billion, double the $132 billion cost of business as usual. Still, free renewable energies would be cheaper in the long run by eliminating costs of fuel to generate electricity, it said.

Poland “has a once-in-a-generation opportunity to move beyond coal,” it said. “Poland is home to a geriatric energy system, based on coal. Its power plants are old with about 70 percent of them being over 30 years old.”

 

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The New York Times

 

Yoshikazu Tsuno/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

An offshore wind turbine off the coast of Fukushima.

 

 

 

 

OFF THE COAST OF FUKUSHIMA, Japan — Twelve miles out to sea from the severely damaged and leaking nuclear reactors at Fukushima, a giant floating wind turbine signals the start of Japan’s most ambitious bet yet on clean energy.

The project’s turbines, and even the substation and electrical transformer equipment, float on giant platforms anchored to the seabed.

 

When this 350-foot-tall windmill is switched on next month, it will generate enough electricity to power 1,700 homes. Unremarkable, perhaps, but consider the goal of this offshore project: to generate over 1 gigawatt of electricity from 140 wind turbines by 2020. That is equivalent to the power generated by a nuclear reactor.

The project’s backers say that offshore windmills could be a breakthrough for this energy-poor nation. They would enable Japan to use a resource it possesses in abundance: its coastline, which is longer than that of the United States. With an exclusive economic zone — an area up to 200 miles from its shores where Japan has first dibs on any resources that ranks it among the world’s top 10 largest maritime countries, Japan has millions of square miles to position windmills.

The project is also a bid to seize the initiative in an industry expected to double over the next five years to a global capacity of 536 gigawatts, according to the industry trade group Global Wind Energy Council. The Japanese have lagged at wind turbine manufacturing, which is dominated by European and Chinese makers.

The Japanese government is paying the 22 billion yen, or $226 million, cost of building the first three wind turbines off Fukushima, part of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s push to make renewable energy a pillar of his economic growth program. After that, a consortium of 11 companies, including Hitachi, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Shimizu and Marubeni, plan to commercialize the project.

“It’s Japan’s biggest hope,” said Hideo Imamura, a spokesman for Shimizu, during a recent trip to the turbine ahead of its test run. “It’s an all-Japan effort, almost 100 percent Japan-made.”

What sets the project apart from other offshore wind farms around the world, consortium officials say, is that its turbines, and even the substation and electrical transformer equipment, float on giant platforms anchored to the seabed. That technology greatly expands potential locations for offshore wind farms, which have been fixed into the seabed, limiting their location to shallow waters.

For this reason, there have been few great sites for offshore wind farming in Japan, which lies on a continental shelf that quickly gives way to depths that make it unfeasible to build structures into the seabed. But floating wind farms could change the picture in a big way.

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Breakthrough made in alternative power engineering in Azerbaijan<br />
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Azerbaijan, Baku, Oct. 25 / Trend /

Trend news agency expert Emil Ismayilov

Azerbaijan has recently made a major breakthrough in the field of alternative and renewable energy sources.

The first hybrid power station, located in Gobustan region of Azerbaijan, generated the first million kilowatt/hours of electricity and delivered it to the power distribution system of the country.

Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev said in his inaugural speech that the diversification policy is being conducted and will be conducted in the economic sphere of Azerbaijan.

Alternative and renewable energy sources play an important role in this process. Their development will reduce dependence on traditional energy sources, ensure the sustainability of the country’s energy system, strengthen energy security, as well as have positive impact on the development of modern and innovative technologies and create the conditions for improving the level of environmental protection.

The generation of the first million kilowatt/hours of electricity is the result of intensive work carried out in Azerbaijan in the field of alternative energy despite the country’s largest oil and gas reserves.

 

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