Category: Justice


Nelson Mandela dead at 95

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View images of civil rights leader Nelson Mandela, who went from anti-apartheid activist to prisoner to South Africa’s first black president.

Nelson Mandela, the revered South African anti-apartheid icon who spent 27 years in prison, led his country to democracy and became its first black president, died Thursday at home. He was 95.

“He is now resting,” said South African President Jacob Zuma. “He is now at peace.”

“Our nation has lost his greatest son,” he continued. “Our people have lost their father.”

A state funeral will be held, and Zuma called for mourners to conduct themselves with “the dignity and respect” that Mandela personified.

“Wherever we are in the country, wherever we are in the world, let us reaffirm his vision of a society… in which none is exploited, oppressed or dispossessed by another,” he said as tributes began pouring in from across the world.

Though he was in power for only five years, Mandela was a figure of enormous moral influence the world over – a symbol of revolution, resistance and triumph over racial segregation.

He inspired a generation of activists, left celebrities and world leaders star-struck, won the Nobel Peace Prize and raised millions for humanitarian causes.

South Africa is still bedeviled by challenges, from class inequality to political corruption to AIDS. And with Mandela’s death, it has lost a beacon of optimism.

Feb. 1990: NBC’s Robin Lloyd reports on Nelson Mandela on the eve of his release from prison in 1990. Mandela’s name has become a rallying cry for the overthrow of apartheid, but no one but prison guards and visitors have actually seen him since he was jailed 27 years ago.

In his jailhouse memoirs, Mandela wrote that even after spending so many years in a Spartan cell on Robben Island – with one visitor a year and one letter every six months – he still had faith in human nature.

“No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin, or his background, or his religion,” he wrote in “Long Walk to Freedom.”

“People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite.”

Mandela retired from public life in 2004 with the half-joking directive, “Don’t call me, I’ll call you,” and had largely stepped out of the spotlight, spending much of his time with family in his childhood village.

His health had been fragile in recent years. He had spent almost three months in a hospital in Pretoria after being admitted in June for a recurring lung infection. He was released on Sept. 1.

In his later years, Mandela was known to his countrymen simply as Madiba, the name of his tribe and a mark of great honor. But when he was born on July 18, 1918, he was named Rolihlahla, which translated roughly – and prophetically – to “troublemaker.”

Mandela was nine when his father died, and he was sent from his rural village to the provincial capital to be raised by a fellow chief. The first member of his family to get a formal education, he went to boarding school and then enrolled in South Africa’s elite Fort Hare University, where his activism unfurled with a student boycott.

As a young law scholar, he joined the resurgent African National Congress just a few years before the National Party – controlled by the Afrikaners, the descendants of Dutch and French settlers – came to power on a platform of apartheid, in which the government enforced racial segregation and stripped non-whites of economic and political power.

As an ANC leader, Mandela advocated peaceful resistance against government discrimination and oppression – until 1961, when he launched a military wing called Spear of the Nation and a campaign of sabotage.

April, 1994: Former political prisoner Nelson Mandela is on the verge of being elected South Africa’s first black president.

The next year, he was arrested and soon hit with treason charges. At the opening of his trial in 1964, he said his adoption of armed struggle was a last resort born of bloody crackdowns by the government.

“Fifty years of non-violence had brought the African people nothing but more and more repressive legislation and fewer and few rights,” he said from the dock.

“I have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. It is an ideal for which I hope to live for and achieve. But if needs be, it is an ideal for which I am prepared to die.”

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Nelson Mandela Dead at 95

The New York Times The New York Times

Published on Dec 5, 2013

Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/U8Ys7n
Nelson Mandela, who led the emancipation of South Africa from white minority rule and served as his country’s first black president, died at 95.

Read the story: http://nyti.ms/1jrjEyE

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Steubenville case: Four more charged, including superintendent, volunteer coach

Steubenville case   Four more charged   including superintendent  volunteer coach photo SteubenvillecaseFourmorechargedincludingsuperintendentvolunteercoach_zpsae159d6e.jpg
NBC News Video  00:07

“How do you hold kids accountable, if you don’t hold the adults accountable,” asks Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine during a press conference to discusses new developments in the special grand jury investigation into the Steubenville teen rape case.

The charges were announced Monday by the state’s top prosecutor, who decried “blurred, stretched and distorted boundaries of right and wrong” by students and grown-ups alike.

“How do you hold kids accountable if you don’t hold the adults accountable?” Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine asked.

Superintendent Michael McVey, 50, was charged with tampering with evidence and obstruction of justice in the aftermath of the incident at the center of the case: the sexual assault of a drunken 16-year-old girl by two high school football players after a booze-fueled party in August 2012.

An assistant coach, Matthew Belardine, 26, was charged with allowing underage drinking, obstructing official business and making a false statement.

Two school employees, strength coach Seth Fluharty, 26, and elementary-school principal Lynnett Gorman, 40, were charged with failure to report child abuse.

The indictment did not contain details of what each person allegedly did.

“What you have is people who were not worried about a victim. They were worried about other things,” DeWine said.

“People made bad choices and the grand jury said there are repercussions.”

A small city of 19,000 about 40 miles from Pittsburgh, Steubenville and its high-school football team, Big Red, became the center of a firestorm last year after the rape allegations surfaced.

Though charges were brought against two players, activists questioned why more people weren’t charged — including other students who sent photos, videos of texts about the assault, or adults who may have known about it but didn’t report it.

After Trent Mays, 17, and Ma’Lik Richmond, 16, were convicted of rape and sentenced to at least a year in juvenile prison in March, a grand jury was convened to determine if anyone else broke any laws.

Jason Cohn / Reuters file

Harding Stadium, home of the Steubenville High Big Red football team.

It met 18 times and heard from 123 witnesses, ultimately issuing six indictments.

Last month, it charged William Rhinaman, 53, the Steubenville schools’ technology director, with tampering with evidence and obstructing justice. His 20-year-old daughter, Hannah, was charged with a theft unrelated to the rape case.

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  • Andy Lopez was spotted by cops in Sonoma County carrying what they believed was a rifle
  • They ordered him to drop his weapon and opened fire when he didn’t comply
  • He was hit multiple times and died on the spot
  • Now a witness has now come forward to say that deputies continued to shot at the boy’s body even after he had fallen to the ground
  • The cops claim Lopez had his back to them so they didn’t realize that he was just 13 years old
  • Local residents in Santa Rosa, California, angered by the shooting carried out a March For Justice on Wednesday night
  • Federal law requires replica guns to have an orange tip, but Lopez’s toy rifle didn’t have one
  • An eighth-grade student who played trumpet in his school band, Lopez was described as a bright and popular student
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By David Mccormack and Associated Press Reporter

 

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Cops unloaded a further six or seven shots into the body of dying teenager Andy Lopez even after he had already hit the ground, claims a neighbor who witnessed the shooting.

Lopez was spotted by deputies on Tuesday afternoon in Santa Rosa, California, carrying a toy rifle which they mistakenly thought was a real assault weapon.

Hundreds of local residents marched on Wednesday night to remember the popular teen and protest at the senseless shooting. They chanted ‘We need justice’ as they questioned how the deputies could mistake a pellet gun for an assault rifle.

 

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Popular student: Andy Lopez, 13, was shot and killed by police officers for carrying a replica assault weapon in Santa Rosa, California, on Tuesday afternoon

 

 

 

 

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Protesters walk towards the site where Andy Lopez was shot and killed as part of a march to voice the local community’s anger at his death

According to a police statement, Lopez was twice instructed to put down his weapon and they only opened fire after he failed to comply.

But Ethan Oliver, who lives across the street, told KTVU.com that the deputies continued to shoot at the boy, even after he had fallen to the ground.

Oliver said he went outside after hearing two gun shots and by that time Lopez was already on the ground. ‘Then the cops went at it again and unloaded like six to seven shots,’ he said.

 

When asked if he meant that the deputy shot Lopez while he was on the ground, Oliver said, ‘Yeah. Exactly what I saw.’

Authorities haven’t responded to his claims, but it raises the possibility that Lopez was still alive when he hit the ground after the first two shots were fired.

During a news conference on Wednesday authorities displayed a real assault weapon and the pellet gun – which resembled an AK-47 with a black magazine and brown butt – to demonstrate how difficult it is to tell them apart.

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Sujey Lopez and her husband Rodrigo Lopez mourn for their son by a memorial set up at the site where he was shot and killed by a Sonoma County sheriff’s deputy

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Neighbor Ethan Oliver, left, witnessed the shooting and claims police continued to shot at the body of Andy Lopez, right, even after he had fallen to the ground

 

 

 

Federal law requires replica guns to have an orange tip, but Lopez’s toy rifle didn’t have one.

Police also revealed that Lopez had his back to the deputies, so they didn’t realize he was so young. He was wearing a hooded sweatshirt and shorts.

They claim Lopez was about 20 to 30 feet from them when he turned with the barrel of the gun pointing toward them and they opened fire because they feared for their lives.

‘The deputy then fired several rounds from his service weapon at the subject,’ said Santa Rosa Police Lt. Paul Henry, ‘striking him at least one time. The subject immediately fell to the ground.’

‘The deputy’s mindset was that he was fearful that he was going to be shot.’

Hundreds of people marched through the Santa Rosa neighborhood where Lopez was killed on Wednesday night to protest and demand justice.

‘We don’t know the reason why they killed him,’ Katia Ontiveros, 18, told the Press Democrat of Santa Rosa. She said her brother was Andy’s friend. ‘They should know if a gun is real.’

 

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Published time: October 25, 2013 21:10
Edited time: October 27, 2013 22:13

The website for the US National Security Agency suddenly went offline Friday in what some claimed was an Anonymous DDoS attack. The agency denied it was under attack, however, saying it was merely updating software.

NSA.gov was unavailable globally for several hours on Friday. Twitter accounts belonging to people loosely affiliated with the Anonymous hacktivism movement suggested they were responsible.

Twitter users @AnonymousOwn3r and @TruthIzSexy both were quick to comment on the matter, and implied that a distributed denial-of-service attack, or DDoS, may have been waged as an act of protest against the NSA

Anonymous Own3r @AnonymousOwn3r

So If it’s a attack comming from me, or maybe from a country? won’t say! It’s just looks like a start of a cyber war

 

S.3xe @TruthIzSexy

NSA remains down! :D You do not fuck the peoples human rights and information!

 

Allegations that those users participated in the DDoS — a method of over-loading a website with too much traffic — are currently unverified, and @AnonymousOwn3r has previously taken credit for downing websites in a similar fashion, although those claims have been largely contested.

 

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Mexican vigilantes take on drug cartels – and worry authorities

Mexico militias take on drug cartels

Self-defence forces gather near Buenavista in Michoacan, Mexico, part of a growing movement of militias taking on the drug cartels. Photograph: ZUMA/REX

 

With their scuffed shoes, baggy trousers and single shot hunting guns, the eight men preparing to patrol their hillside barrio in the southern Mexican town of Tixtla hardly looked like a disciplined military force. But this motley collection of construction workers and shopkeepers claim to have protected their community from Mexico‘s violent drug cartels in a way the police and military have been unable – or unwilling – to do.

“Since we got organised, the hit men don’t dare come in here,” said one young member of the group, which had gathered at dusk on the town’s basketball court, before heading out on patrol. “Extortions, kidnappings and disappearances are right down.”

Over the past year, vigilante groups like this have sprung up in towns and villages across Mexico, especially in the Pacific coast states of Guerrero and Michoacán. They make no pretence to be interrupting drug trafficking itself but they do claim to have restored a degree of tranquillity to daily life.

In a country where the police are commonly felt to commit more crime than they prevent, the militias have won significant popular support, but they have also prompted fears that the appearance of more armed groups can only provoke more violence.

Tensions exploded this weekend when a march by self-defence groups triggered a gun-battle between gunmen and federal forces in the city of Apatzingán, followed by attacks on power stations that left hundreds of thousands without electricity.

Nearly seven years after the government launched a military-led crackdown on the cartels, the weekend’s events have caused many to ask if the new government of President Enrique Peña Nieto is presiding over the first rumblings of an undeclared civil war.

“Perhaps the closest antecedent is the civil wars of central America,” said an editorial posted on the widely-read news site Sin Embargo.

The weekend’s violence began on Saturday when a group of militiamen marched on the city, saying they were responding to calls for support by residents there who want to set up their own self-defence group. Similar groups claim to have forced the brutal Knights Templar cartel out of smaller towns in the region, but Apatzingán, capital of the Tierra Caliente region, has remained largely in the hands of the drug barons.

Troops allowed the marchers into the city after they had disarmed, but when they gathered in the central square, they came under attack from gunmen on the rooftops – including some who were reportedly stationed in the cathedral belltower. A video shows people running for cover as federal police officers appear to return fire at the attackers.

At the end of the day, the marchers withdrew after the army agreed to step up patrols and include observers from the self-defence groups. But the movement’s leader, José Mirales, warned reporters that the fight was not over. “We are going to make sure that organised crime is expelled from Apatzingán,” he said. “They will try to respond.”

That response came just hours later, when, shortly after midnight, nine electricity substations were firebombed in a string of almost simultaneous attacks. More than 400,000 people were left without electricity. At least four petrol stations were also torched.

In a statement, Mexico’s interior ministry promised that: “The actions of the criminals will not stop the actions of the government to protect the population.”

But while the government claimed order had been restored to Aptazingán, the tension continued into Sunday when a second group of civilians marched on the local army base. The Knights Templar were widely believed to be behind this second march that demanded federal forces withdraw their protection from the self-defence groups. Also on Sunday, five bodies were reportedly found on the outskirts of the city, all wearing t-shirts identifying them as members of the self-defence groups.

 

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5 Dead as Mexican Vigilante Groups, Cartel Clash


Clashes in which self-described “self-defense” forces sought to oust the Knights Templar drug cartel from the western Mexico state of Michoacan left at least five men dead and hundreds of thousands of people without electricity.

The weekend confrontations followed a daring march by a self-defense force into the city of Apatzingan, the central stronghold of the pseudo-religious Knights Templar cartel that for years has dominated Michoacan, a state that sends a steady stream of avocados and migrants to the United States.

State Interior Secretary Jaime Mares said soldiers and federal police had taken over security in Apatzingan following the clashes.

Since rising up in February against systematic extortion by the Knights Templar, residents of a half dozen towns that formed self-defense patrols have lived without access to Apatzingan, a commercial and road hub that is home to the region’s main hospital and markets.

Self-defense leaders said they finally grew tired of the cartel blocking services and commerce in an attempt to strangle their uprising and showed up Friday on Apatzingan’s outskirts, armed and ready to “liberate” the city. They were turned back by soldiers who said they couldn’t enter with weapons.

A convoy of hundreds of unarmed self-defense patrol members returned on Saturday and successfully entered the city, where they were met by gunfire, presumably from the Knights Templar.

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Jorge Reyes Jorge Reyes

Published on Sep 14, 2013

Attention!! (updated sept. 14, 2013) Download & Share before is remove!

Urgent Message from Anonymous to Mankind…

http://www.digitaljournal.com/article…

https://www.facebook.com/nuestrofutur…
https://www.facebook.com/MillionMaskM…
https://www.facebook.com/events/50502…
http://www.zeemaps.com/view?group=654…

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Anonymous launches video ahead of the Million Mask March

By Justin King

The collective behind the global protest that will occur on November 5th in over 150 countries launched a YouTube video today to raise awareness of the march.
Organizer of the Washington, D.C. event, John Fairhurst, explained that, as with many things within Anonymous, the event has taken on a life of its own. Saying that there are whole websites dedicated to the event, which he has no direct affiliation with. Anonymous is a leaderless collective that thrives on ideas, and once an idea is proposed and accepted, the originator of that idea steps back into the faceless crowd of supporters and joins everyone else that has elected to support the idea. The idea of a global march occurring simultaneously in cities around the world resonated within Anonymous. There are publicly organized protests occurring in over 50 U.S. cities and in almost every developed nation’s capital. The collective has established an event map to keep track of the different demonstration sites. Many countries where open protesting is prohibited have been organizing their events in secret and are not included on the map.
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Published on Aug 16, 2013

According to a recent study, an astounding 30 percent of India’s lawmakers are facing criminal charges raining from petty theft to rape and murder. Not surprisingly, the lawmakers themselves are resisting efforts to clean up parliament. LinkAsia’s Ajoy Bose reports from New Delhi on the political maneuvering going on inside the world’s largest democracy.

Watch more at http://linkasia.org.

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breakingtheset

Published on Aug 16, 2013

Abby Martin talks to Norman Solomon, Co-founder of RootsAction.org about the petition to award whistleblower Bradley Manning with the Nobel Peace Prize.

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Bradley Manning Nobel Peace Prize nod backed by 100k petition-signers

Published time: August 12, 2013 20:07
Edited time: August 13, 2013 10:16

US Army Private First Class Bradley Manning (AFP Photo / Saul Loeb)

US Army Private First Class Bradley Manning (AFP Photo / Saul Loeb)

The Nobel Prize committee has received a petition that endorses awarding the peace prize to US Army Private Bradley Manning, who is convicted of espionage and facing up to 90 years behind bars for leaking classified information to WikiLeaks.

US anti-war activist Normon Soloman, one of the organizers of the petition, gave the 5,000-page document to Nobel committee member Asle Toje on Monday.

However, Toje said the annually awarded US$1 million prize is “not a popularity contest,” adding that such campaigns do not influence the Nobel Committee in its choice.

“Remaining in prison and facing relentless prosecution by the US government, no one is more in need of the Nobel Peace Prize,” states the petition, which garnered more than 100,000 signatures.

“No individual has done more to push back against what Martin Luther King Jr. called ‘the madness of militarism’ than Bradley Manning,” the petition reads.

A screenshot from act.rootsaction.org

A screenshot from act.rootsaction.org

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Ariel Castro’s house of horror leveled in Cleveland

Neighbors, victims and family clapped and cheered on the street as the heavy equipment clawed away at the roof and walls of Ariel Castro’s house where he kept three women captive for more than a decade.

Jennifer Lindgren and Doug Stanglin ,
USA TODAY 11:03 a.m. EDT
August 7, 2013

One of his victims brought yellow balloons in memory of other missing children.

 

CLEVELAND — Demolition crews leveled Ariel Castro’s former house of horror Wednesday not long after one of three young women held captive there for 11 years brought a bundle of yellow balloons in memory of other missing children.

Cheers erupted on Seymour Avenue as the heavy equipment clawed away part of the roof and walls of the rundown house where Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight were rescued after years of living in chains.

Crews reduced the two-story house to rubble in a little more than an hour. The demolition was carried live online and also drew crowds of neighbors and onlookers.

Castro, 53, pleaded guilty last month to 937 charges including rape, kidnapping and aggravated murder charges in connection with the abduction of the three young women, who were rescued May 6.

Knight, who also spoke at Castro’s sentencing in a moving condemnation of his crimes, made a brief statement and asked God to grant strength to those still missing and told their families to have hope. She says the yellow balloons represented those still out there waiting to be found.

 

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Isn’t  about  time   corporations are held  accountable for who they do  business with?

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The woman who nearly died making your iPad

Tian Yu worked more than 12 hours a day, six days a week. She had to skip meals to do overtime. Then she threw herself from a fourth-floor window

Tian Yu

Tian Yu tried to kill herself in 2010, as did 17 of her Foxconn colleagues. Photograph: University Research Group

At around 8am on 17 March 2010, Tian Yu threw herself from the fourth floor of her factory dormitory in Shenzhen, southern China. For the past month, the teenager had worked on an assembly line churning out parts for Apple iPhones and iPads. At Foxconn’s Longhua facility, that is what the 400,000 employees do: produce the smartphones and tablets that are sold by Samsung or Sony or Dell and end up in British and American homes.

But most famously of all, China’s biggest factory makes gadgets for Apple. Without its No 1 supplier, the Cupertino giant’s current riches would be unimaginable: in 2010, Longhua employees made 137,000 iPhones a day, or around 90 a minute.

That same year, 18 workers – none older than 25 – attempted suicide at Foxconn facilities. Fourteen died. Tian Yu was one of the lucky ones: emerging from a 12-day coma, she was left with fractures to her spine and hips and paralysed from the waist down. She was 17.

When news broke of the suicide spree, reporters battled to piece together what was wrong in Apple’s supply chain. Photos were printed of safety nets strung by the company under dorm windows; interviews with workers revealed just how bad conditions were. Some quibbled over how unusual the Foxconn deaths were, arguing that they were in line with China’s high rate of self-killing. However conscience-soothing that claim was in both Shenzhen and California, it overlooked how those who take their own lives are often elderly or women in villages, rather than youngsters who have just moved to cities to seek their fortunes.

For the three years since, that’s the spot where the debate has been paused. In all the talk of corporate social responsibility and activists’ counter-claims that the producers of iPads and iPhones are still sweating in “labour camp” conditions, you hardly ever hear those who actually work at Foxconn speak at length and in their own terms. People such as Tian Yu.

Yu was interviewed over three years by Jenny Chan and Sacom, a Hong Kong-based group of rights campaigners. From her hospital recuperation in Shenzhen to her return to her family’s village, Chan and her colleagues kept in touch throughout and have published the interviews in the latest issue of an academic journal called New Technology, Work and Employment. The result is a rare and revealing insight into how big electronics companies now rely on what is effectively a human battery-farming system: employing young, poor migrants from the Chinese countryside, cramming them into vast workhouses and crowded dorms, then spitting out the ones who struggle to keep up.

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iDownloadBlog

Foxconn reportedly hiring 90,000 workers to help with iPhone 5S production

By , Jul 30, 2013

Foxconn4-thumb-620x401-102212

A new report out of Taiwan this morning claims that Foxconn is going on a major hiring spree to help fill orders for Apple’s next generation iPhone, believed to be the iPhone 5S. Production on the handset is said to be ramping up ahead of its fall launch.

Citing sources familiar with the matter, Taiwanese publication Focus Taiwan reports that Foxconn is starting to heavily recruit for its Shenzhen plant, and it’s looking to add as many as 90,000 people to its workforce as it begins to fulfill major 5S orders…

Here’s the report:

“Hon Hai Group, also known as Foxconn Technology Group, has started recruiting new workers for its Shenzhen production complex, one of the sites where it assembles iPhones and iPads for Apple Inc., sources in the Apple supply chain said Saturday.

The sources said Hon Hai, the world’s largest contract electronics maker, needs additional staff to deal with large orders from Apple for a new version of the iPhone.”

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