Category: Video Games



F0x1214

Published on Jan 18, 2013

SHARE – LIKE – FAVORITE – TWEET – FB – RE-UPLOAD – READ DESCRIPTION – DOWNLOAD – COPY-PASTE TITLE/URL – SPREAD THE WORD – MAKE THIS VIRAL – I’M COUNTING ON YOU! THEY ARE ACTORS.

Copy-paste the following if you want and spread it like a virus in related/popular videos/articles/etc:

“YouTube: “Sandy Hook HOAX BLOWN: The Evidence and Motive” OR /watch?v=oLyhX3B8HYM”

Most videos came from Scott Walker’s channel (Subscribe): http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCH7lietNjn7CJoHE-qUQEeQ

GREENBERG SEXTON PHOTO ALBUM (This is a re-upload of the albums): https://picasaweb.google.com/108353779637663365536

Veronique Pozner MEETUP (Real family): http://www.meetup.com/SpiritualiTea/member/2333579/

RAW First Aerial View Sandy Hook: http://www.wfsb.com/video?clipId=8069373&%C2%ADautostart=true%EF%BB%BF

Parker’s Photoshop: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qe9KehTf82o

“Parker” family with Barry: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2249148/Sandy-Hook-school-shooting-Pr…

“Laura Phelps” full audition, 2009: https://vimeo.com/15035510

Batman TDKR connection (1hr 58mins): http://illuminutti.files.wordpress.com/2012/12/thedarkknight12.jpg

Special thanks for the uploads and exposing the TRUTH to the following channels:

Scott Walker http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCH7lietNjn7CJoHE-qUQEeQ
thepaulstalservice http://www.youtube.com/user/thepaulstalservice
Life in a Psyop http://www.youtube.com/user/lifepsyop
Operation Terror http://www.youtube.com/user/OperationTerror
We Are Change http://www.youtube.com/user/wearechange
revmichellehopkins http://www.youtube.com/user/revmichellehopkins
Sheilaaliens 2 http://www.youtube.com/user/Sheilaalien
m m http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBxTOEpGLpxHnG-GFAiVUcQ
LogicBeforeAuthority http://www.youtube.com/user/LogicBeforeAuthority
HistoricalRecordsVLT http://www.youtube.com/user/HistoricalRecordsVLT
1mYourGh0st http://www.youtube.com/user/1mYourGh0st
I would also like to thank my supporters, all truth seekers, and subscribers!

Other mentions:
CNN http://www.youtube.com/user/CNN
The White House http://www.youtube.com/user/whitehouse
ABC News http://www.youtube.com/user/ABCNews

PETITIONS YOU SHOULD SIGN:

1. http://wh.gov/nMVX
2. http://wh.gov/nFYI
3. http://wh.gov/Q7UM
4. http://wh.gov/QMCs
5. http://wh.gov/QsPJ
6. http://wh.gov/QXw6
7. http://wh.gov/Q9aV
8. http://wh.gov/Qze5
9. http://wh.gov/Q7zv
10. http://wh.gov/PzTJ

THE GUN DEBATE:

Both Sides of The Argument:
YouTube: “GOA Larry Pratt Owns CNN’s Piers Morgan On 2nd Amendment And Gun Control” OR http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_fHJcSsC0aY

The History of Gun Control:
YouTube: “INNOCENTS BETRAYED – The TRUE story of GUN CONTROL WORLDWIDE – (Graphic Images)” OR http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1pKasF6l3y0

Australia Gun Ban:
YouTube: “Watch what happens when Guns are banned in Australia” OR http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p8RDWltHxRc

Contact your representatives.

RECOMMENDED CHANNELS (SUBSCRIBE):
http://www.youtube.com/user/scrawny2brawny
http://www.youtube.com/user/TheGroxt
http://www.youtube.com/user/BenSwannRealityCheck
http://www.youtube.com/user/wearechange
https://www.youtube.com/user/AmidsTheNoise
http://www.youtube.com/user/revmichellehopkins
http://www.youtube.com/user/LogicBeforeAuthority
http://www.youtube.com/user/LifePsyop
http://www.youtube.com/user/thepaulstalservice
http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCH7lietNjn7CJoHE-qUQEeQ
http://www.youtube.com/user/AlienScientist
http://www.youtube.com/user/Suspicious0bservers
http://www.youtube.com/user/GrayStateMovie
http://www.youtube.com/user/matlarson10
http://www.youtube.com/user/weavingspider
http://www.youtube.com/user/galacticwacko
http://www.youtube.com/user/TheSpiritScience
http://www.youtube.com/user/ae911truth
http://www.youtube.com/user/R11110000
http://www.youtube.com/user/sv3rige
http://www.youtube.com/user/RedPillR3volution

§ 107 . Limitations on exclusive rights: Fair use

Notwithstanding the provisions of sections 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phonorecords or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright. In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include—

(1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes;

(2) the nature of the copyrighted work;

(3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole; and

(4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work.

The fact that a work is unpublished shall not itself bar a finding of fair use if such finding is made upon consideration of all the above factors.

About these ads

Crossroads News : Changes In The World Around Us And Our Place In It

IT :  Global Community – Video Games

Violent Video Games Not So Bad When Players Cooperate

ScienceDaily

New research suggests that violent video games may not make players more aggressive — if they play cooperatively with other people.


In two studies, researchers found that college students who teamed up to play violent video games later showed more cooperative behavior, and sometimes less signs of aggression, than students who played the games competitively.

The results suggest that it is too simplistic to say violent video games are always bad for players, said David Ewoldsen, co-author of the studies and professor of communication at Ohio State University.

“Clearly, research has established there are links between playing violent video games and aggression, but that’s an incomplete picture,” Ewoldsen said.

“Most of the studies finding links between violent games and aggression were done with people playing alone. The social aspect of today’s video games can change things quite a bit.”

The new research suggests playing a violent game with a teammate changes how people react to the violence.

“You’re still being very aggressive, you’re still killing people in the game — but when you cooperate, that overrides any of the negative effects of the extreme aggression,” said co-author John Velez, a graduate student in communication at Ohio State.

One study was recently published online in the journal Communication Research, and will appear in a future print edition. The second related study was published recently in the journal Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking.

The CBSN study involved 119 college students who were placed into four groups to play the violent video game Halo II with a partner. The groups differed in whether they competed or cooperated in playing the game.

First, all participants filled out a survey about their video game history and a measure of their aggressiveness.

Those in direct competition played in multiplayer mode and were told that their task was to kill their opponent more times than they were killed.

Those in indirect competition played in single-player mode, but were told their task was to beat their opponent by getting further in the game.

In the cooperative condition, participants were told to get as far as they could through the game by working with their partner in Halo II’s cooperative campaign mode. In this case, the pair worked together to defeat computer-controlled enemies.

The final group simply filled out the measures and played the game at the end of the study. Their game playing was not recorded.

After playing the violent video game, the same pairs of participants who played with or against each other took part in a real-life game where they had the opportunity to cooperate or compete with each other.

In this game, they played multiple rounds where they were given dimes which they could keep or share with their partner. The researchers were looking to see if they engaged in “tit for tat” behavior, in which the players mirrored the behaviors of their partner. In other words, if your partner acts cooperatively towards you, you do the same for him. Tit for tat behavior is seen by researchers as a precursor to cooperation.

The results showed that participants who played the video game cooperatively were more likely than those who competed to show cooperative tendencies in this later real-life game.

“These findings suggest video game research needs to consider not only the content of the game but also how video game players are playing the game,” Velez said.

The second study, published in Communication Research, extended the findings by showing that cooperating in playing a violent video game can even unite people from rival groups — in this case, fans of Ohio State and those of their bitter rival, the University of Michigan.

This study involved 80 Ohio State students who, when they came to the lab for the experiment, were paired with a person who they thought was another student participant. In fact, it was one of the experimenters who was wearing an Ohio State t-shirt — or one from the rival University of Michigan.

One of the researchers made sure to point out the t-shirt to the student participant.

The student and confederate then played the highly realistic and violent first-person-shooter video game Unreal Tournament III together — either as teammates or as rivals.

After playing the video game, the participants played the same real-life game used in the previous study with their supposed partner, who was really one of the researchers.

They also completed tasks that measured how aggressive they felt, and their aggressive tendencies.

The results showed the power of cooperatively playing violent video games in reducing aggressive thoughts — and even overcoming group differences.

As in the first study, players who cooperated in playing the video game later showed more cooperation than did those who competed against each other.

It even worked when Ohio State participants thought they were playing with a rival from the University of Michigan.

“The cooperative play just wiped out any effect of who you were playing with,” Velez said. “Ohio State students happily cooperated with Michigan fans.”

Also, those participants who played cooperatively showed less aggressive tendencies afterwards than those who played competitively, at least at first. In fact, those who played competitively with a rival actually showed less aggression than those who played with a supporter of their own team.

“If you’re playing with a rival, and that rival is cooperating with you, that violates your expectations — you’re surprised by their cooperation and that makes you even more willing to cooperate,” Ewoldsen said.

Eventually, even those who competed with each other in the video games started cooperating with each other in the real-life games afterwards.

“The point is that the way you act in the real world very quickly overrides anything that is going on in the video games,” Ewoldsen said. “Video games aren’t controlling who we are.”

These results should encourage researchers to study not only how the content of violent video games affects players, but also how the style of play has an impact.

“What is more important: cooperating with another human being, or killing a digital creature?” Ewoldsen said.

“We think that cooperating with another human overrides the effects of playing a violent video game.”

Other authors of the CBSN paper were Cassie Eno of Waldorf College; Bradley Okdie of Ohio State’s Newark campus; Rosanna Guadagno of the University of Alabama; and James DeCoster of the University of Virginia.

Other authors of the Communication Research paper were Chad Mahood and Emily Moyer-Guse, both of Ohio State.


Story Source:

The above story is reprinted from materials provided by Ohio State University. The original article was written by Jeff Grabmeier.

Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. For further information, please contact the source cited above.


Journal References:

  1. J. A. Velez, C. Mahood, D. R. Ewoldsen, E. Moyer-Guse. Ingroup Versus Outgroup Conflict in the Context of Violent Video Game Play: The Effect of Cooperation on Increased Helping and Decreased Aggression. Communication Research, 2012; DOI: 10.1177/0093650212456202
  2. David R. Ewoldsen, Cassie A. Eno, Bradley M. Okdie, John A. Velez, Rosanna E. Guadagno, Jamie DeCoster. Effect of Playing Violent Video Games Cooperatively or Competitively on Subsequent Cooperative Behavior. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 2012; 15 (5): 277 DOI: 10.1089/cyber.2011.0308
 

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of ScienceDaily or its staff.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,573 other followers