Category: Deforestation


MAN 

Steve Cutts Steve Cutts·

Published on Dec 21, 2012

Animation created in Flash and After Effects looking at mans relationship with the natural world.

Music: In the Hall of the Mountain King by Edvard Grieg.

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Description  :  Boomstronken; foto door Fruggo, juni 2003.

Attribution: Fruggo from nl

Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

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New Research Shows Tree Roots Regulate CO2, Keep Climate Stable

Climate News Network | February 19, 2014 8:30 am

The argument, put forward by a team from Oxford and Sheffield Universities in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, begins with temperature. Warmer climates mean more vigorous tree growth and more leaf litter, and more organic content in the soil. So the tree’s roots grow more vigorously, said Dr. Christopher Doughty of Oxford and colleagues.

They get into the bedrock, and break up the rock into its constituent minerals. Once that happens, the rock starts to weather, combining with carbon dioxide. This weathering draws carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere, and in the process cools the planet down a little. So mountain ecosystems—mountain forests are usually wet and on conspicuous layers of rock—are in effect part of the global thermostat, preventing catastrophic overheating.

The tree is more than just a sink for carbon, it is an agency for chemical weathering that removes carbon from the air and locks it up in carbonate rock.

That mountain weathering and forest growth are part of the climate system has never been in much doubt: the questions have always been about how big a forest’s role might be, and how to calculate its contribution.

Keeping climate stable

U.S. scientists recently studied the rainy slopes of New Zealand’s Southern Alps to begin to put a value on mountain ecosystem processes. Dr. Doughty and his colleagues measured tree roots at varying altitudes in the tropical rain forests of Peru, from the Amazon lowlands to 3,000 meters of altitude in the higher Andes.

They measured the growth to 30 cm below the surface every three months and did so for a period of years. They recorded the thickness of the soil’s organic layer, and they matched their observations with local temperatures, and began to calculate the rate at which tree roots might turn Andean granite into soil.

Then they scaled up the process, and extended it through long periods of time. Their conclusion: that forests served to moderate temperatures in a much hotter world 65 million years ago.

Read More Here

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Jan 16, 2014 by Sci-News.com

According to an international group of scientists led by Dr Nate Stephenson of the US Geological Survey, most of tropical and temperate tree species grow more quickly and sequester more carbon as they grow older.

Eucalyptus bridgesiana tree.

Eucalyptus bridgesiana tree.

The report, published in the journal Nature, is based on repeated measurements of 673,046 individual trees belonging to 403 species, some going back more than 80 years.

“Rather than slowing down or ceasing growth and carbon uptake, as we previously assumed, most of the oldest trees in forests around the world actually grow faster, taking up more carbon. A large tree may put on weight equivalent to an entire small tree in a year,” said co-author Dr Richard Condit from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.

“This report would not have been possible without long-term records of individual tree growth. It was remarkable how we were able to examine this question on a global level, thanks to the sustained efforts of many programs and individuals,” added co-author Dr Mark Harmon of Oregon State University.

“Extraordinary growth of some species, such as Australian mountain ash – also known as eucalyptus – (Eucalyptus regnans), and the coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) is not limited to a few species,” Dr Stephenson said.

“Rather, rapid growth in giant trees is the global norm and can exceed 600 kg per year in the largest individuals. In human terms, it is as if our growth just keeps accelerating after adolescence, instead of slowing down. By that measure, humans could weigh half a ton by middle age, and well over a ton at retirement.”

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Anyone  with even  an  inkling  of  compassion  would mourn the  suffering  and  the loss of  this innocent life.  The  mourning is  doubled  by the  knowledge  that more and  more  often  it is  becoming  obvious  that  humans  are  losing their  humanity.  There  is  no  regard  for  life, there  is  no regard for suffering.  Humanity  has  been  lost  to  greed  and callous  indifference.  I choose  not to  use ignorance  because  even  one  who is  ignorant  understands  that a living  being   has  the capacity  to  suffer.  Ignorance does not  nullify  the   ability to feel  compassion.  This  cruelty  , this  callous indifference  to  life is  not  ignorance  it is  EVIL.

~Desert Rose~

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The terrible fate of Raja the baby elephant, chained and held hostage by an angry mob: An image that will haunt you and a story that will enrage you

  • In this shocking expose the Duchess of Cornwall’s brother reveals how baby elephant Raja was shockingly mistreated as he was kept captive in Sumatra. Following the deforestation of the land to produce palm oil, elephants have been forced to live with humans, destroying farms, flattening houses and sometimes killing people. Villagers took Raja, and demanded compensation after his family ruined crops in the area.

By Mark Shand

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In all the 30 years I have been working in Asian elephant conservation, I thought I had seen it all – blatant corruption, the rape and total disregard of our beautiful planet and sickening wildlife atrocities, to name but a few. All due to the most dangerous animal of all: homo sapiens.

Not much shocks me any more, but something happened in recent weeks that shook me to the core when the charity Elephant Family and the Ecologist Film Unit set out to document the environmental genocide that is out of control on the island of Sumatra,  Indonesia.

Sumatra is special to me because I spent a lot of time there on expeditions when I was younger. It was a paradise – vast pristine forests, intact coral reefs and abundant wildlife.

 

Raja is a male baby elephant found in north Aceh, villagers found him roaming community plantation and held him captive

Raja is a male baby elephant found in north Aceh, villagers found him roaming community plantation and held him captive

All this has changed now and their elephants are the most endangered on the planet. In a single generation, the population has been cut in half, with countless other animals disappearing at breakneck speed.

During the filming, a helpless, emaciated baby male elephant called Raja, who was barely a year old, was found in a village, shackled with heavy chains to a tree. He had been taken hostage by the villagers, who were demanding compensation from the Sumatran  government for the damage his family had done to their crops.

Can you believe that we are now  living in a world where people are actually holding baby elephants to ransom? It is almost unthinkable. But just look at the photographs – look at Raja, as he strains against his chains, waving his little trunk for food and reassurance. He is bellowing in desperation for his mother.

Can you believe that we are now living in a world where people are actually holding baby elephants to ransom?

Can you believe that we are now living in a world where people are actually holding baby elephants to ransom?

He strains against his chains, waving his little trunk for food and reassurance. He is bellowing in desperation for his mother.

He strains against his chains, waving his little trunk for food and reassurance. He is bellowing in desperation for his mother

I have heard that sound of distressed calves many times in my life. It never fails to haunt me. But it is his eyes that haunt me more than anything – pleading for help – innocent, desperate and helpless.

A war is being waged across Asia. In the face of relentless deforestation, elephants are being forced out of their natural habitats and they have no choice but to share their living space with humans. As the elephants’ forest home is destroyed, stressed and starving herds flee from the chainsaws straight into villages.

They demolish everything in sight, trampling crops, flattening houses and often killing people. Frankly, you really cannot blame the villagers for taking such drastic steps in the sheer desperation to survive and feed their own families.

Capturing a baby elephant and holding it to ransom is grisly and depressing, but it is reality as humans and elephants fight for space.

People need to know why this is  happening. They need to understand what is driving this madness.

Read More  and  View  Video Here

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World Heritage Centre has extended heritage listed boundary by more than 170,000 hectares

Scoured out old growth forest tree at Mt Field National Park, Tasmania.
Scoured out old growth forest tree at Mt Field National Park, Tasmania Photograph: James Lane/AAP Image

Almost 200,000 hectares of Tasmania’s old growth forest have been world heritage listed, bringing hope that a three-decade fight between environmentalists, politicians and loggers is over.

The World Heritage Committee has extended the heritage listed boundary of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area by more than 170,000 hectares after accepting a proposal from the Australian government which will give the areas the highest level of environmental protection in the world.

The old growth forest areas now added to the heritage listing are in the Upper Florentine as well as within the Styx, Huon, Picton and Counsel River Valley.

Logging will continue in the forest in areas Environment Minister Tony Burke described as “less contentious”.

The proposal the government put to the World Heritage Committee was the work of people within the forestry industry as well as environmentalists, including Miranda Gibson who famously spent 457 days living in a tree in the old growth forest in a campaign for extended environmental protection.

Speaking from Hobart where she had watched a livestream of the World Heritage Committee handing down the decision, Gibson said she was thrilled and had contemplated returning to the tree if she was unhappy with the decision.

“It’s good to know I don’t have to go back to the tree unless I want to visit,” she said.

“The hardest part [of living in the tree] was not knowing how long I would be up there or if the loggers would come and log around me.

“It was obviously also very isolating.”

Gibson started living at the top of the 60 metre eucalypt tree in December 2011 and was driven out by bushfires in March this year. By then the proposed extended areas for world heritage listing had been granted temporary protection.

She decided to campaign from the ground until the committee handed down their official decision.

 

Read More Here

Peggy Atwood

Published on Jan 30, 2013

A song I wrote when I visited the site after 9/11; always thought a little heavy, but it is time to get it out there. All photos taken from the web, if there is any infringement, please contact me, I will include credits. Included on my CD “Renegade of the Light Brigade” during the remix and urging of the late, great Steve Burgh.

Originally posted on Socio-Economics History Blog:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2301757/Governments-climate-watchdog-launches-astonishing-attack-Mail-Sunday--revealing-global-warming-science-wrong.html

Click on image for article!

  • Government’s climate watchdog launches astonishing attack on the Mail on  Sunday… for revealing global warming science is wrong! 
    by David Rose, http://www.dailymail.co.uk/ 
    The official watchdog that advises the  Government on greenhouse gas emissions targets has launched an astonishing  attack on The Mail on Sunday – for accurately reporting that alarming  predictions of global warming are wrong.
    -
    We disclosed that although highly influential  computer models are still estimating huge rises in world temperatures, there has  been no statistically significant increase for more than 16  years.
    -
    Despite our revelation earlier this month,  backed up by a scientifically researched graph, the Committee on Climate Change  still clings to flawed predictions.
    -
    Leading the attack is committee member Sir  Brian Hoskins, who is also director of the Grantham Institute for Climate Change  at Imperial College, London. In a blog on the Committee on Climate…

View original 115 more words

A noble undertaking to  be  sure.  Were  it not for the  simple  fact that  Science has  not  , for the  most  part, respected the  right of creatures  to  exist in an environment  that  is suitable  for  their rightful existence.  Science  and  mankind  alike  have, for the  most  part,  considered  only it’s pleasure  and curiosity where   animals  are  concerned.  They have  neither  respected  their  lives  nor  their  habitats.  Always  putting their  selfish  needs  before  anything else. 

Which  leads  one  to  wonder as  to the  why of  this  undertaking?  I  would  venture  to say   it is  all for the  greater  glory  of their  Scientific  careers.  They  nether  care  nor  are  concerned  with the  well being  or  happiness of  any of these  creatures.  The  proof is in the lack  of impetus where pollution, experimental animal  research and  deforestation are  concerned.  Just  look  at the  palm oil plantations  flourishing  at the  expense of  the  Orangutang ,  the  bees  and  pollinators   dying off  due to  GMO’s.   The  Whale, porpoise and a  long  list  of  sea life.   The endless  list  of   animals  that  are  endangered,  being  poached and savaged on a  daily  basis, and then  there is  always   the commercialization of the  creatures.    Aquariums for  profit,  Zoos that confine  these  poor  animals to cages or  concrete  pens in many  cases in   environments that  are  completely  alien  and  detrimental to the  species.  Exotic  animals  captured and  sold for the  highest dollar to people  who think they  are  pretty  and since they  have  the  money   why  not ?   Of course if they  can  afford it  they  want  what  no one  else has, regardless of the morality of  such a desire.  Avarice and social standing know  no  limits to   satiating  these desires

Photograph by Tim Laman

A lesser bird of paradise flaunts his flank plumes to entice females.

Purchase this print »

www.timlaman.com

 

Who  cares  what  these poor  creatures  had to endure  to  make it  to  that pet shop or  dealer.  The only thing that  matters is they  got  what they  wanted , the  animal  be  damned.  After  all it is  just  an  animal  isn’t it ? 

Let’s not  forget  the  Circus,  animals  taken  from their  mothers  at  a young  age   that  are  savagely   beaten and traumatized to  conform for the  amusement  of those  willing to  pay for the entertainment  and for the profit of  those unethical beasts  that mistreat and terrorize  them on a  daily  basis.  Their  suffering is  of  no consequence and  trivial  to those  who  want to  possess  them.

 

 Image Source                                                             Image Source

 

Image Source                                                 Image source

In light of  the cruelty  and  callousness with  which  humanity has  treated  the  creatures  of this planet,  I  would venture  to  say  they are  better  off  as  a part  of  history   than   part  of the  next  series of  experiments  for the  glory  of greedy  and  soulless enterprises.

~Desert Rose~

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Jennifer Welsh | Mar. 17, 2013, 10:39 AM

On Friday at a National Geographic sponsored TEDx conference, scientists met in Washington, D.C. to discuss which animals we should bring back from extinction. They also discussed the how, why, and ethics of doing so.They called it “de-extinction.”

There are a few guidelines for which ancient species are considered, and sadly, dinosaurs are so long dead they aren’t in the picture. Their DNA has long ago degraded, so researchers are fairly sure that Jurassic Park will never happen.

But there are plenty of other animals on the table. The list of candidates is actually pretty long, considering.

Here are the 24 animals they are hoping to one day resurrect.

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10 Animals That Were Hunted To Extinction

Tasmanian tiger (Extinct since 1936)

Tasmanian Tiger

Wikipedia

Tasmania Tigers were hunted by humans to extinction

Woolly Mammoth (Extinct for ~10,000 years)

Dodo Bird (Extinct since ~1681)

Stellar’s Sea Cow (Extinct since 1768)

Passenger Pigeon (Extinct since 1914)

Passenger Pigeon (Extinct since 1914)

Stuffed passenger pigeon on display at the Royal Ontario Museum.

Wikipedia/Keith Schengili-Roberts

Bubal Hartebeest (Extinct since ~1954)

Javan Tiger (Extinct since ~1970s)

Zanzibar leopard (Extinct since ~1990s)

Pyrenean Ibex (Extinct since 2000)

Western Black Rhino (Extinct 2011)

Western Black Rhino (Extinct 2011)

Na Son Nguyen/AP

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For Those Of Us who Love Animals And  Understand  Why They Need To Be  Protected.  This  One Is For You !!
British photographer Tim Flach is known for taking human-like photographs of animals. His latest body of work, called “More Than Human,” captures the emotions of wild creatures through intensely close shots — like the stunning picture of a gorilla below.

The intimate animal portraits, which feature everything from a featherless chicken to a pair of affectionate chimpanzees, are meant to illuminate the similarities between animal poses, gestures, and gazes, and our own.

Photographing animals on a set, as opposed to in their natural habitat comes with a unique set of challenges.

“You can never predict an animal’s mood,” Flach says on his website. “So you have to plan beforehand to get what you want.” To make the animals feel as comfortable as possible, Flach may adjust the temperature of the studio or play music.

You can purchase a hardcover copy of Flach’s animal portraits here or visit his website to see more of the award-winning photographer’s work.

A chimpanzee affectionately cradles its child.

A chimpanzee affectionately cradles its child.

See The Animals

 

CBC News

Posted: Mar 16, 2013 4:22 PM ET

Last Updated: Mar 16, 2013 4:21 PM ET

The decline in the Monarch population now marks a statistical long-term trend and can no longer be seen as a combination of yearly or seasonal events, experts say. The decline in the Monarch population now marks a statistical long-term trend and can no longer be seen as a combination of yearly or seasonal events, experts say.

The number of Monarch butterflies making it to their winter refuge in Mexico dropped 59 per cent this year, falling to the lowest level since comparable record-keeping began 20 years ago, scientists reported Wednesday.

It was the third straight year of declines for the orange-and-black butterflies that migrate from the United States and Canada to spend the winter sheltering in mountaintop fir forests in central Mexico. Six of the last seven years have shown drops, and there are now only one-fifteenth as many butterflies as there were in 1997.

In the Hamilton region, Monarchs have been faced with a loss of habitat for many years said Jen Baker, Head-of-the-Lake Land Trust Program co-ordinator for the Hamilton Naturalists’ Club. Milkweed, the Monarchs’ main food source as well as where they lay their eggs, has been decreasing in the region.

“Milkweed can’t necessarily grow in fields that are sprayed for weeds. It might be good for crops, but it’s bad for milkweed,” she said, adding that invasive species also pose a risk.

“Dog Strangling Vine is an invasive plant that is a cousin of the milkweed. We’ve found some females will lay their eggs on the vine and the babies die because that’s not their food.”

Both planting milkweed and trying to control the Dog Strangling Vine population are both efforts the Naturalists’ Club encourages, Baker added.

The decline in the Monarch population now marks a statistical long-term trend and can no longer be seen as a combination of yearly or seasonal events, the experts said.

But they differed on the possible causes.

There are issues facing Monarchs south of the border, too, according to experts. Illegal logging in the reserve established in the Monarch wintering grounds was long thought to contribute, but such logging has been vastly reduced by increased protection, enforcement and alternative development programs in Mexico.

The World Wildlife Fund, one of the groups that sponsored the butterfly census, blamed climate conditions and agricultural practices, especially the use of pesticides that kill off the Monarchs’ main food source, milkweed. The butterflies breed and live in the north in the summer, and migrate to Mexico in the winter.

“The decrease of Monarch butterflies … probably is due to the negative effects of reduction in milkweed and extreme variation in the United States and Canada,” the fund and its partner organizations said in a statement.

Monarchs ‘a shared responsibility’ Omar Vidal, the World Wildlife Fund director in Mexico, said: “The conservation of the Monarch butterfly is a shared responsibility between Mexico, the United States and Canada. By protecting the reserves and having practically eliminated large-scale illegal logging, Mexico has done its part.”

“It is now necessary for the United States and Canada to do their part and protect the butterflies’ habitat in their territories,” Vidal said.

 

Read Full Article Here

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Sample  Photos  of  Monarch  Caterpillars, Butterflied and different  varieties  of  Milkweed  to  assist  in  identifying  for a  butterfly  garden

WOOD PILE

by Staff Writers
Moffett Field CA (SPX) Mar 04, 2013


Trends in forest canopy green cover over the eastern United States from 2000 to 2010 derived from NASA MODIS satellite sensor data. Green shades indicate a positive trend of increasing growing season green cover, whereas brown shades indicate a negative trend of decreasing growing season green cover. Four forest sub-regions of interest are outlined in red, north to south as: Great Lakes, Southern Appalachian, Mid-Atlantic, and southeastern Coastal Plain. Image credit: NASA. For a larger version of this image please go here.

NASA scientists report that warmer temperatures and changes in precipitation locally and regionally have altered the growth of large forest areas in the eastern United States over the past 10 years.

Using NASA’s Terra satellite, scientists examined the relationship between natural plant growth trends, as monitored by NASA satellite images, and variations in climate over the eastern United States from 2000 to 2010.

Monthly satellite images from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) showed declining density of the green forest cover during summer in four sub-regions, the Upper Great Lakes, southern Appalachian, mid-Atlantic, and southeastern Coastal Plain.

More than 20 percent of the non-agricultural area in the four sub-regions that showed decline during the growing season, were covered by forests. Nearly 40 percent of the forested area within the mid-Atlantic sub-region alone showed a significant decline in forest canopy cover.

 

Read Full Article Here

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