Category: Strike


breakingtheset

Published on Nov 12, 2013

On this episode of Breaking the Set, Abby Martin remarks on news that Wal-Mart workers will be expected to work on Thanksgiving, and calls attention to the arrest of over 50 associates arrested outside a LA Wal-Mart who were protesting the companies low wages. Abby then speaks with Lloyd Gardner, Rutgers Emeritus Professor and author of ‘Killing Machine’, discussing how US foreign policy is constantly moving away from diplomacy and into an age of drones and private armies. Abby then calls out the corporate media for its incessant superficial coverage of the Obamacare website, all the while ignoring both the successes and the truly legitimate criticisms of the Affordable Care Act. Abby then speaks with Arnoldo Casillas, attorney for the family of Andy Lopez, a 13 year old who was killed by Santa Rosa police while holding a toy gun. They discuss the community reaction to Andy’s death and the lawsuit to hold officers accountable for the murder. BTS wraps up the show highlighting the success of the Rolling Jubilee, a debt relief project launched by Occupy Wall Street group, Strike Debt, who over the course of one year absolved $15 million of personal debt for 2,693 people across the US.

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SF transit agency, unions reach deal to end strike

 

Associated Press

With the BART transit system on strike, people line up along the Embarcadero near the Ferry Building to catch a ferry to Oakland, Calif., during the afternoon commute Monday, Oct. 21, 2013, in San Francisco. Frustrated bay area commuters started the work week Monday facing gridlocked roadways and long lines for buses and ferries as a major transit strike entered its fourth day, increasing pressure on negotiators to reach a deal that resumes train service. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
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With the BART transit system on strike, people line up along the Embarcadero near the Ferry Building to catch a ferry to Oakland, Calif., during the afternoon commute Monday, Oct. 21, 2013, in San Francisco. Frustrated bay area commuters started the work week Monday facing gridlocked roadways and long lines for buses and ferries as a major transit strike entered its fourth day, increasing pressure on negotiators to reach a deal that resumes train service. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — The San Francisco Bay Area’s main commuter train system and its unions reached a tentative agreement on a new contract Monday night, ending a crippling four-day strike.

Union officials announced the deal, which still requires approval from union members, then from the Bay Area Rapid Transit’s board of directors.

BART spokeswoman Alicia Trost said limited service would begin Tuesday at 4 a.m. on all lines. BART officials hoped trains would be running at full strength in time for the afternoon commute.

BART is the nation’s fifth-largest rail system, with an average weekday ridership of 400,000.

Workers walked off the job on Friday after talks broke down. Commuters endured jammed roadways and long lines for buses and ferries, as they looked for alternate ways around the region.

The talks between BART and its two largest unions dragged on for six months— a period that saw two chaotic dayslong strikes, contentious negotiations and frazzled commuters wondering if they would wake up to find the trains running or not.

“The public expects us to resolve our differences and to keep the Bay Area moving,” BART general manager Grace Crunican said Monday night.

Crunican said there would be no immediate announcements on the details while union leaders explained the agreement to their members, but she said it was a compromise and added: “This deal is more than we wanted to pay.”

 

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Strike over: Bay Area transit workers reach compromise with management

A transit strike that for four days halted normal commutes in San Francisco has ended, but the deal was not immediately released

 

 

Bart strike over

Striking Bart workers picket on Friday in Oakland. Photo: Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

 

A transit strike that crippled the San Francisco Bay Area has ended, raising hopes of a swift return to normality after four days of commuting chaos.

Union leaders and managers of the Bay Area Rapid Transit (Bart) system agreed a tentative deal late on Monday; service is expected to slowly come back on line over the course of Tuesday.

The stand-off had paralysed the US’s fifth-largest commuter rail system, which has an average weekday ridership of 400,000. Gridlocked roads and long queues for buses and ferries caused widespread disruption and recrimination since Bart workers walked off the job last Friday in a dispute over pay and conditions, and both sides were under immense pressure to come to an agreement.

“This offer is more than we wanted to pay but it is a new path with our workers and it delivers the Bart of the future,” said the agency’s general manager, Grace Crunican, after emerging from negotiations on Monday.

Bart strike over

The standoff had paralysed the US’s fifth-largest commuter rail system, which has an average weekday ridership of 400,000. Photograph: Eric Risberg/AP

Details of the deal were not immediately released, and it is still pending ratification by Bart’s board of directors and members of the Employees International Union Local 1021 and Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1555. The accord was brokered by a federal mediator, Greg Lim. A previous strike in July had halted services for four days.

 

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