Category: Medical Care



 

Published on Mar 22, 2014

World famous and inspirational Duncan Lou Who the two legged boxer puppy goes to the beach for the first time, along with Mane ( who was featured in Rolling Stone, Vanity Fair and The Shake Book ) , Rou, Ducky and Miso. Duncan was born with severely deformed rear legs that had to be removed. He has a wheel chair, but can’t stand to use it. So we let him be free and just walk on his two legs. There is some slow motion in this video, but NONE of the video has been sped up, this gives you an idea of how fast Duncan really it. All footage taken with a GoPro Hero 3.

Follow Panda Paws Rescue on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/PandaPawsRes…

Shake Book: http://carlidavidsonphotography.com/S…

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At first glance, rescuers thought they were dealing with an aged chihuahua who had lost his teeth because of neglect. Tragically, the pooch has been rushed to the veterinarian on Saturday evening; his rescuers state this dog is less than two-years-old.

Rescuers believed tiny little Nemo has been badly abused and his teeth have been knocked out.

“Only a monster would knock the teeth out of a helpless little chihuahua,” stated Kathleen Godwin of Ithaca, New York. “It’s beyond horrible to think of what this poor little one must have suffered and the pain he must be in now.”

 

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According to San Antonio Pets Alive (SAPA), a senior Chihuahua is in dire need of emergency care at an animal control agency in Texas.

The non-profit organization shared the following information about the 9-year-old dog in need on Saturday:

This sweet ol’ guy just came in to ACS and he needs a hospice foster. He is a medical emergency. He will need to have his eye enucleated and SAPA will provide his medical care for a foster or adopter.

He is a sweet and gentle 9 yr old Chihuahua and he has been through hell and back and is very emaciated and has a painful Upper respiratory infection (like havinga bad cold). He is contagious to other pets for the next 7 to 10 days but he is so tiny and east to keep separated.

Chewy needs a warm space away from the others until he is feeling better. He weighs approx 8 lbs. This sweet little man just needs to be comfortable and loved for the short time he has left. Please email if you can help him.

 

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Athena
Hempstead Animal Shelter

March 20, 2014

At twelve plus years of age, and mostly blind, Athena is no longer considered to be a “highly adoptable” dog – a fact which her prior owner discovered she attempted to secure a new home for the elderly dog.

Though Athena’s former guardian loved her beautiful senior dog, she was no longer able to care for her, and after attempts to find Athena a new home failed, that person reached out to the Hempstead Town Shelter in Wantagh, N.Y., to have the dog put down.

The shelter staff went to retrieve Athena and promised the dog’s owner, who is disabled and had fallen ill, that they would try to find a home for Athena before euthanasia was considered.

The shelter posted this statement on Thursday:

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Ayo has been charged with 8 counts of animal cruelty.
Gwinnett County Sheriff’s Department

Leslie Ayo, the owner of Heavens Gate Kennels located in Lawrenceville, was arrested on Thursday and faces eight counts of animal cruelty for the inhumane tail docking of eight Rottweiler puppies reports the gwinnettdailypost.com.

Ayo was hired by a local woman living on Deer Oaks Drive to de-worm, de-claw, and dock the tails of her eight recently born puppies. A witness watched as Ayo used an instrument that looked like a pair of scissors to cut the pups’ tails. Nothing was used to stop the bleeding; one puppy later died at a local veterinarian’s office. The vet then called Gwinnett County Animal Control to report the cruelty.

The witness stated the puppies all screamed in pain. No anesthetics were used.

On Ayo’s Facebook page for Heavens Gate Kennels, she states:

“I gained valuable experience and knowledge as an S.P.C.A Animal Caretaker, Zoo Volunteer, Vet Technician, owner of a successful pet supply boutique, and Director of a No-Kill Dog Rescue. I am a breeder who knows the industry from the bottom all the way to the top and it shows in the quality and temperaments of my animals.”

According to the American Veterinary Medical Association:…..

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Otto, aka Harley

According to Wednesday’s KTLA 5 News, a senior dog who was left at an animal control facility in Baldwin Park, Calif., earlier this month, will be reunited with his guardians.

The dog, named “Harley,” had been left at the animal control facility with a sad note from his heartbroken  guardians who were  unable to care for his medical needs.  Harley, who was later determined to actually be “Otto” did not die at the facility – he was saved by Toby Wisneski, the CEO and founder of Leave No Paws Behind.

Wisneski set out to find the elderly dog’s guardians and shortly thereafter, this comment was posted to the rescue agency’s Facebook page:

We asked his humans to please contact us AND I have just gotten off the phone with them!!! They sent me this picture with him where he is in the little shirt we found him in AND have given us the information on the vets that have taken care of Otto all his life!!!!

His name is ” Otto Wolfgang Maximus” and we can’t wait to let him know that we have located his loving mommy and daddy! We will have more information and there will be an updated story

The reunion is expected to take place on March 28.

Follow the rescue that saved Otto’s life here.

 

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Little Harley was left in a basket at a shelter with a note attached that his owners didn't have the money to help him.

March 9, 2014

Had it not been for Toby Wisneski of Leave No Paws Behind animal rescue in Sun Valley, Calif. a 13+ year-old dachshund may not have seen another day. Wisneski not only rescued the pooch, but even hopes to reunite the dog with the senior couple who left him in a basket at an animal shelter late last week reports cbs local.com.

In the basket was a handwritten note, which told the story of a senior citizen couple who lived on a very small budget. Their dog, a constant companion for his entire life, had started to present with bloody stools and vomiting.

The couple had no money to take their dog to the vet. His skin disease was bothering him too, and they wrote they didn’t even have the money to euthanize their friend. They asked the shelter to put their dog to sleep because he never lived a day without them.

Wisneski rushed the dog, she named Harley, to the East Valley Veterinary Clinic where Dr. Danielle Chapman has been caring for him. Harley is now being treated for a non-contagious mange, bad teeth, joint pain and arthritis. Dr. Chapman says that Harley loves to be cuddled.

As Wisneski stated, not everyone who surrenders their dog to a shelter is “bad.”

“I do not believe that all humans who surrender their loving companions are bad people. What I have come to realize is that some, and there are a few, fall on hard and difficult times, loss of jobs, senior and elderly folks who are sick and need help, loss of homes etc. etc. I also believe that they are not aware that there is help out there for their beloved pets and we are hoping to be able to get that message to them. If Harley’s humans come forward, we will speak with them, do our standard home check AND if we find that they are indeed loving, kind and genuinely care for sweet Harley, which we do believe, and the only issue is help with medical care and basic needs for him, yes, we will reunite them!”

Leave No Paws Behind is hoping someone might recognize this dog and inform the owners to come forward.

Sometimes older people have no idea where to reach out for help. For most animal lovers, they can not comprehend surrendering their senior pets.

On the organization’s Facebook page, one woman however, posted what may have been the heartbreaking truth about this situation:

“I too could never conceive giving up my little old man doxie or any pets. However, I do understand that situations are different for all people. After my mom retired well into her 70′s, I see first hand how it only takes one event to send you into financial crisis. And if you have no family or friends to lean on, I can understand the hopelessness someone might feel. A lot of the older generation is not used to assistance, this couple may be in need themselves, as they said in the note they are sick. I do hope they come forward, they have nothing to ashamed of. Besides saving just Harley, they too can be saved.”

If anyone recognizes this dog, please get in touch with Leave No Paws Behind, Inc.

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Meet Bo Jangles - he may not be physically perfect, but his beauty shine through. Can we find him a wonderful home?

Rescue Me Ohio

February 26, 2014

Bo Jangles is a one-year-old boxer mix who obviously didn’t get much care as a puppy because his legs have angular deformities leaving his back limbs four inches longer than his front legs.

According to the Humane Society of Preble County, Bo Jangles is ugly, but volunteers wholeheartedly disagree. A volunteer writes this about our lovely “underdog” of the day:

“Bo Jangles is a 1 year old male Boxer mix who has a huge desire to play, play play! Though he may not win the prize for the most handsome dog in the kennel, he sure will for being the happiest! Bo will benefit from a fenced yard and an owner who has the time to teach him proper manners.”

Read More and  Watch Video Here
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YouCaring.com - Free Online Fundraising

Help Tika Eat Without Pain

If  each  of  us  gives just  $1 it will go a  long  way  to  help this  poor  old  girl be pain free

13days left$50raised of $1,200 goal

Organizer: Sharon Kilby Beneficiary: Tika

A tender 11 year old Jack Russell Terrier x Chihuahua whose seal eyes break my heart as I know she is in pain

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Tika came to me in need of a home as her previous heart breakingly couldn’t keep her. In September 2013, Tika had her physical which revealed that at some point she would need dental work.

Another heartbreak is that Tika’s previous owner who I kept in touch with suddenly passed away and I made a promise to keep Tika in good health.  I am on disability and that is a meager income. Unfortunately I don’t have insurance to cover the expenses of her surgery.

  • Tika needs about $1,200 to cover the high side of her surgery costs. It is expected she will have more than one extraction. Being a senior dog, she may take longer in recovery.
  • If her goal is not reached, what portion is reached will go towards her bill.Giving Tika this surgery will help her to be free of pain and discomfort . Your donations will make a substantial difference to her quality of life.

I want to help Tika,  but I don’t have any money to donate.

That’s okay! You can help in lots of other ways. You can send me suggestions for fundraising ideas and you can share Tika’s story with all of your friends.

Tell all your friends on Facebook/Twitter and Instagram. Share Tika’s story and hopefully people who can afford to contribute will do so. Let’s all help Tika eat without pain again.

Thank you so much for all of your support. xx

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MercolaHealthyPets MercolaHealthyPets

February 24, 2014 |

By Dr. Becker

Today, I have a very special guest speaking with me over the phone. His name is Dr. Hubert Karreman, and he is the veterinarian at the Rodale Institute. The Rodale Institute was founded in 1947 by organic pioneer J.I. Rodale to study the link between healthy soil, healthy food and healthy people.

Before he joined Rodale, Dr. Karreman founded Bovinity Health, a small company that provides natural veterinary products for large animal medicine. He also founded his own solo practice, Penn Dutch Cow Care, which he operated for 15 years as a holistic large animal practitioner.

Dr. Karreman now works primarily with certified organic dairy farmers as a consultant. He also lectures widely on natural treatment options for cows, which is the topic of our discussion today.

Entering Veterinary School: A Childhood Dream Comes Full Circle

I asked Dr. Karreman to talk a little about his career path as a large animal veterinarian. He replied that he grew up in the suburbs right outside Philadelphia, in Bala Cynwyd, PA. His dad was a professor at the University of Pennsylvania. Like many other children, Dr. Karreman wanted to be a veterinarian for cats and dogs when he grew up. He was very influenced by books by James Herriot (author of All Creatures Great and Small, among many others), which he read during elementary school and junior high.

When Dr. Karreman was in the eighth grade, the veterinarian his family used came to his school to give a talk about his profession, and Dr. Karreman was even more motivated toward his goal of becoming a DVM.

But when he eventually went away to college at the University of New Hampshire, he began as a biochemistry major. Then he did a bit of “wandering,” as many young people at that age do. He worked at a gas station during the summer between his freshman and sophomore years, which got him thinking about the earth’s resources. When he returned to school, he began learning about resource conservation. He took a soil science class, really got into soils, and declared that as his new major.

During his time at the University of New Hampshire, he completed a work-study program with the USDA Soil Conservation Service, as it was called back in the early 1980s. Dr. Karreman said it was really wonderful, fun work for a kid from the suburbs, surveying land for conservation practices on dairy farms in southeastern New Hampshire. He could always see dairy cows off in the distance and was drawn to them, but didn’t get the opportunity to interact with them while he was involved in soil conservation work.

Immediately upon graduation in June 1984, his desire to learn about dairy cows drove him to work as an apprentice on dairy farms. He mucked out cow stalls and did general farm labor for a pittance. Then in the winter of 1984-85, Dr. Karreman traveled to Holland to visit relatives. They weren’t farmers, but he told them, “I’d love to milk cows here in Holland or learn how.” So he started milking cows in Holland and was instantly addicted.

For the next six years, Dr. Karreman continued to work on farms. In 1988, he landed on an organic farm and was exposed for the first time to alternative medicine. He thought, “Wow, no way are these going to work, these little BB-sized white pellets in these round little bottles.” They were homeopathics. And then he saw them work, and one day it hit him like a bolt of lightning from God. Dr. Karreman says he almost heard a voice from above say, “Go to veterinary school.”

Suddenly, his childhood dream of becoming a veterinarian came alive again. He had to take some additional classes to get into vet school, and he knew he had to get really good grades this time around, unlike his University of New Hampshire grade point average! And as Dr. Karreman puts it, “Lo and behold, I got top grades and got in!”

Isn’t that a great story? I was exposed to homeopathy while studying wildlife rehabilitation at the age of 16. At that time, I couldn’t even pronounce the word “homeopathy,” nor did I understand it. But I saw that it worked amazingly well. It sounds like Dr. Karreman had a very similar experience with the use of homeopathy with dairy cows. I asked him what his exposure was to homeopathy in veterinary school.

Dr. Karreman explained that while in vet school he didn’t hide the fact that he was into organics and was interested in alternative medicine. And as he thinks back on it now, during his first two years of school while he was learning the basics, the professors he had were more open to discussions about alternative therapies than the actual clinicians who taught him in his third and fourth years.

After Vet School, Dr. Karreman Establishes a Satellite Practice with an Emphasis on Large Animal Homeopathics

Next, I asked Dr. Karreman where he began working after graduating from veterinary school. Did he go with a traditional practice? Or did he open his own practice so he could take a more integrative approach, using alternative treatments like homeopathy?

Dr. Karreman said that when he was a herdsman from 1988 to 1990 on a Biodynamic organic farm, he received training – as did other farmers in Lancaster and Chester counties in southeastern Pennsylvania – from Dr. Ed Schaefer. Dr. Karreman feels Dr. Schaefer is the best teacher of large animal homeopathics in the U.S.

When he was finishing up vet school, Dr. Karreman asked Dr. Schaefer if he would like him to set up a satellite practice in Lancaster County, since Dr. Schaefer was in Lebanon County. Dr. Schaefer agreed, but couldn’t pay Dr. Karreman much because he hadn’t planned for someone to offer to open a satellite practice for him! But as Dr. Karreman points out, “When my heart’s into something, I do it regardless of the pay.” He thinks a lot of veterinarians are like that.

While attending the presentations Dr. Schaefer gave to teach homeopathics, Dr. Karreman started meeting up again with many of the farmers he’d known during his years as an apprentice. As it turns out, he didn’t have to do much cold calling to get business for his satellite practice, because he’d made all those contacts years before. This was at a time when organics were really starting to take off, and the farmers he knew were like, “Hey, this is cool. This is Dr. Karreman. He’s just out of vet school. And he wants us to use homeopathics just like we all learned from Dr. Schaefer. This is great!” And things just sort of developed from there.

It’s really wonderful and unique how things ultimately fell into place. Dr. Karreman believes it was serendipity along with spiritual guidance. He feels he was put on his path when he heard those words from above, “Go to veterinary school” back in the late 1980s. Things have fallen into place almost every day since then.

Beyond Homeopathics to Multi-Potency Homeochords

I asked Dr. Karreman if when he started out, he practiced exclusively holistic medicine, or was it more integrative? Did he practice traditional veterinary medicine at any point?

He answered that interestingly, most vets who get into alternative medicine first spend many years practicing conventional medicine – antibiotics, hormones, steroids, etc. Eventually, they arrive at a place where they say to themselves, “I’m just not seeing the results I want to see,” or “I didn’t go to vet school just to use these two or three or four treatment protocols.” But in Dr. Karreman’s case, he actually went to vet school because he had already seen how well alternative therapies work.

But once he started practicing in 1995, he quickly hit sort of a glass ceiling with regard to homeopathics in the treatment of dairy cows. He wasn’t a classically trained homeopath. He refers to himself as a mongrel or mutt – an eclectic practitioner. He uses whatever it takes to get the healing response he’s looking for. That’s why when he attended vet school, he wanted to mix and match different modalities. Every case is different, and he knew that.

For example, let’s say a cow is fresh (has just given birth to a calf), hasn’t passed the afterbirth, and has pneumonia. She’s sunken-eyed and depressed. She’s obviously sick. Using homeopathic pyrogen alone isn’t going to get the same results as also giving IV fluids, perhaps some calcium (if she’s older), and maybe some other therapies as well. Dr. Karreman would try various combinations of treatments – whatever it took to initiate a healing response in the animal.

At that time, he might have been a little quicker to suggest antibiotics (than now). He personally had nothing against antibiotics, but most of the farmers he worked with were looking to use homeopathics rather than antibiotics. That’s where he started hitting the glass ceiling with homeopathics. At the time, Dr. Karreman happened to be reading a book by James Duke and Steven Foster called A Field Guide to Medicinal Plants (Eastern and Central North America) (Houghton and Mifflin, Boston, 1990).

He began reading that some plants, like caulophyllum (blue cohosh), arnica, and aconite, are also used in botanical medicine for roughly the same physical indications as in homeopathic medicine. He realized there was a lot of overlap. But physicians from the Eclectic school of medicine and native Indians would use actual botanical juice, but in small amounts — whereas homeopaths use only the energetic essence of the plant to treat similar conditions. So Dr. Karreman thought, “Why not use both?”

That was back in 1999 or 2000. Now when he uses homeopathics, he likes to use what he calls multi-potency homeochords. He still must “diagnose” (select) the correct remedy. He still needs to know what the remedies are called. But once he knows 3-4 indications, he knows what remedy is most appropriate. He then uses it in a multi-potency combination:mother tincture 1X, 2X,4X,12C, 30C and 200C – equal parts of ever increasing diluted and vigorously shaken original plant material.

Selecting the right remedy, and providing some of the juice plus some of the homeopathic energetic essence, in Dr. Karreman’s opinion, stimulates a deeper healing response than using just one or the other.

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