Published time: January 18, 2014 19:38
A Tokyo Electric Power Corp.'s (Tepco) official stands at H4 tank area, at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan (AFP Photo / Kimimasa Mayama)

A Tokyo Electric Power Corp.’s (Tepco) official stands at H4 tank area, at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan (AFP Photo / Kimimasa Mayama)

A record high level of beta rays released from radioactive strontium-90 has been detected at the crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant beneath the No. 2 reactor’s well facing the ocean, according to the facility’s operator.

Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) measured the amount of beta ray-emitting radioactivity at more than 2.7 million becquerels per liter, Fukushima’s operator said as reported in Japanese media. The measurements were taken on Thursday.

There has been a spike of radiation in this area since the beginning of the year. The measurements taken on Monday showed 2.4 million Bq/l, while the results taken on January 9 indicated the amount of beta rays at 2.7 million Bq/l, according to TEPCO’s Friday announcement.

Strontium-90 is a radioactive isotope of strontium produced by nuclear fission with a half-life of 28.8 years. The legal standard for strontium emissions is 30 becquerels per liter.

In March 2011 an earthquake triggered a tsunami that hit Japan’s coast, damaging the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The catastrophe caused the meltdown of three nuclear reactors at the facility, leading to the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl.

The water used to cool the reactors has been leaking into the soil and contaminating the ground water ever since. Some of the radioactive water has been escaping into the Pacific Ocean.

Read More Here

Enhanced by Zemanta