Pope’s sudden resignation sends shockwaves through Church

Pope Benedict XVI waves during a mass conducted by Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone, for the 900th anniversary of the Order of the Knights of Malta at the St. Peter Basilica in Vatican February 9, 2013. REUTERS/Alessandro Bianchi

By Philip Pullella | Reuters – Mon, Feb 11, 2013

  • Pope: “My strengths … are no longer suited”Reuters Videos  1:10Pope Benedict surprises the world and his own aides by announcing his resignation. Rough Cut (no reporter …

VATICAN CITY (Reuters) – Pope Benedict stunned the Roman Catholic Church on Monday when he announced he would stand down, the first pope to do so in 700 years, saying he no longer had the mental and physical strength to carry on.

Church officials tried to relay a climate of calm confidence in the running of a 2,000-year-old institution, but the decision could lead to uncertainty in a Church already besieged by scandal for covering up sexual abuse of children by priests.

The soft-spoken German, who always maintained that he never wanted to be pope, was an uncompromising conservative on social and theological issues, fighting what he regarded as the increasing secularization of society.

It remains to be seen whether his successor will continue such battles or do more to bend with the times.

Despite his firm opposition to tolerance of homosexual acts, his eight year reign saw gay marriage accepted in many countries. He has staunchly resisted allowing women to be ordained as priests, and opposed embryonic stem cell research, although he retreated slightly from the position that condoms could never be used to fight AIDS.

He repeatedly apologized for the Church’s failure to root out child abuse by priests, but critics said he did too little and the efforts failed to stop a rapid decline in Church attendance in the West, especially in his native Europe.

In addition to child sexual abuse crises, his papacy saw the Church rocked by Muslim anger after he compared Islam to violence. Jews were upset over rehabilitation of a Holocaust denier. During a scandal over the Church’s business dealings, his butler was accused of leaking his private papers.

In an announcement read to cardinals in Latin, the universal language of the Church, the 85-year-old said: “Well aware of the seriousness of this act, with full freedom I declare that I renounce the ministry of Bishop of Rome, Successor of St Peter …

“As from 28 February 2013, at 20:00 hours (1900 GMT) the See of Rome, the See of St. Peter will be vacant and a conclave to elect the new Supreme Pontiff will have to be convoked by those whose competence it is.”

POPE DOESN’T FEAR SCHISM

Benedict is expected to go into isolation for at least a while after his resignation. Vatican spokesman Father Federico Lombardi said Benedict did not intend to influence the decision of the cardinals in a secret conclave to elect a successor.

A new leader of the world’s 1.2 billion Roman Catholics could be elected as soon as Palm Sunday, on March 24, and be ready to take over by Easter a week later, Lombardi said.

Several popes in the past, including Benedict’s predecessor John Paul, have refrained from stepping down over their health, because of the division that could be caused by having an “ex-pope” and a reigning pope alive at the same time.

Lombardi said the pope did not fear a possible “schism”, with Catholics owing allegiances to a past and present pope in case of differences on Church teachings.

He indicated the complex machinery of the process to elect a new pope would move quickly because the Vatican would not have to wait until after the elaborate funeral services for a pope.

It is not clear if Benedict will have a public life after he resigns. Lombardi said Benedict would first go to the papal summer residence south of Rome and then move into a cloistered convent inside the Vatican walls.

The resignation means that cardinals from around the world will begin arriving in Rome in March and after preliminary meetings, lock themselves in a secret conclave and elect the new pope from among themselves in votes in the Sistine Chapel.

There has been growing pressure on the Church for it to choose a pope from the developing world to better reflect where most Catholics live and where the Church is growing.

“It could be time for a black pope, or a yellow one, or a red one, or a Latin American,” said Guatemala’s Archbishop Oscar Julio Vian Morales.

The cardinals may also want a younger man. John Paul was 58 when he was elected in 1978. Benedict was 20 years older.

“We have had two intellectuals in a row, two academics, perhaps it is time for a diplomat,” said Father Tom Reese, senior fellow at the Woodstock Theological Center at Georgetown University. “Rather than electing the smartest man in the room, they should elect the man who will listen to all the other smart people in the Church.”

Liberals have already begun calling for a pope that would be more open to reform.

“The current system remains an ‘old boy’s club’ and does not allow for women’s voices to participate in the decision of the next leader of our Church,” said the Women’s Ordination Conference, a group that wants women to be able to be priests.

Read Full Article Here

Vatican Considers Worldwide Candidates to Replace Pope Benedict XVI


by William Bigelow 13 Feb 2013, 1:03 AM PDT

Now that Pope Benedict XVI has resigned, the speculation about his successor is already heating up. What follows is a short list of those who have been mentioned as possible candidates.

Two candidates from Italy are prominently mentioned, because Italians are abundant in the College of Cardinals: Cardinal Angelo Scola, the archbishop of Milan, and Cardinal Gianfranco Ravasi, head of the Vatican’s culture office. Scola’s Milan archdiocese is considered the most important in Italy, and he is known as a serious intellectual. Ravasi is also an intellectual; he is a scholar of Hegel and Nietzsche and his “Courtyard of the Gentiles” project, which engages in dialogue with artists, scientists, and even atheists, has gained acclaim. It doesn’t hurt his cause that Benedict chose him to lead the Vatican’s spiritual exercises during Lent.

Looking outside Italy, Cardinal Wilfrid Napier of South Africa noted, “I think we would have a better chance of getting someone outside of the Northern hemisphere this time, because there are some really promising cardinals from other parts of the world.”

Manila Archbishop Luis Antonio Cardinal Tagle, who is only 56 and may be considered too young, Brazilian Cardinal Odilo Pedro Scherer, the 63-year-old archbishop of Sao Paulo, and Argentine Cardinal Leonardo Sandri, 69, who spoke for Pope John Paul II when Parkinson’s disease left him silent, are all candidates.

Cardinal Peter Kodwo Appiah Turkson of Ghana, who would be the first black Pope, has been mentioned, too, although he has made statements that veered away from orthodoxy.

From North America, Cardinal Timothy Dolan of New York and Canadian Cardinal Marc Oeullet are the leading candidates. Oeullet has headed the Vatican’s office for bishops.

If the Catholic Church looks outside of Europe for a successor, it would have demographic support. In 1900, two-thirds of Catholics lived in Europe, but today, two-thirds live in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

 

College of Cardinals

Biographical notes

[Updated: 22.04.2012]


Notice: the biographical notes are only a working instrument for the press.


 
Cardinal Angelo Scola, Archbishop of Milan, was born on 7 November 1941 at Malgrate, Milan. He was ordained on 18 July 1970 and holds doctorates in theology and philosophy.Cardinal Scola was actively involved in the Communion and Liberation Movement before becoming assistant researcher in philosophy and then assistant professor of moral theology at the University of Fribourg. In 1982 he was appointed professor of theological anthropology at the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and Family, and taught contemporary Christology at the Pontifical Lateran University, Rome. On 21 September 1991, he was ordained Bishop of Grosseto, subsequent to his appointment on 20 July.

The Holy Father appointed him Rector of the Pontifical Lateran University and President of the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and Family in 1995.

On 5 January 2002 the Pope appointed him Patriarch of Venice. He served as President of the Bishops’ Conference of the Triveneta region.

Relator general of the 11th  Ordinary General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, The Eucharist: Source and Summit of the Life and Mission of the Church (October 2005).

On 28 June 2011 he was appointed Archbishop of Milan.

On 11 October 2011 he was elected President of the Bishops’ Conference of Lombardy (Italy).

Created and proclaimed Cardinal by John Paul II in the Consistory of 21 October 2003, of the Title of Ss. XII Apostoli (Twelve Holy Apostles).

Member of:

  • Congregations: for the Doctrine of the Faith; for the Clergy; for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments; for the Oriental Churches;
  • Pontifical Councils: for the Family; for the Laity; for Culture; for Promoting New Evangelization;
  • Council of Cardinals for Study of Organizational and Economic Affairs of the Holy See.

 

 

College of Cardinals

Biographical notes

[Updated: 04.11.2012]


Notice: the biographical notes are only a working instrument for the press, for the exclusive use of accredited journalists.


 
Cardinal Gianfranco Ravasi, President of the Pontifical Council for Culture and President of the Pontifical Commission for Sacred Archeology, was born in Merate, Italy on 18 October 1942. He was ordained a priest of the archdiocese of Milan on 28 June 1966 and studied at the Pontifical Gregorian University and at the Pontifical Biblical Institute.He taught the Old Testament at the theological faculty of northern Italy. From 1989 to 2007 he served as prefect of the Ambrosian Library in Milan.

He has written may books, articles for L’Osservatore Romano and L’Avvenire and hosts the television show Frontiers of the Spirit.

On 3 September 2007 he was appointed titular Archbishop of Villamagna in Proconsolari and president of the Pontifical Council for Culture and president of the Pontifical Commissions for the Cultural Heritage of the Church and for Sacred Archeology (in November 2012 the Pontifical Commission for the Cultural Heritage was absorbed into the Pontifical Council for Culture),
He was consecrated on 29 September 2007.

Since March 2012 he is president of the cultural association Casa di Dante in Rome, dedicated to making the works of Dante known throughout Italy and abroad.

Created and proclaimed Cardinal by Benedict XVI in the consistory of 20 November 2010, of the Deaconry of San Giorgio in Velabro (Saint George in Velabro).

Member of:

  • Congregation for Catholic Education;
  • Pontifical Councils: for Inter-religious Dialogue; for Promoting New Evangelization.

College of Cardinals

Biographical notes

[Updated: 26.10.2012]


Notice: the biographical notes are only a working instrument for the press, for the exclusive use of accredited journalists.


© Gregorz Galazka

Cardinal Wilfrid Fox Napier, O.F.M., Archbishop of Durban, South Africa, Apostolic Administrator sede vacante et ad nutum Sanctae Sedis of Umzimkulu, was born on 8 March 1941 in Swartberg, South Africa. He was ordained for the Franciscans on 25 July 1970 following philosophical and theological studies at the Catholic University of Louvain.After learning Xhosa, he worked in the parish of Lusikisiki and did pastoral work in Tabankulu. In 1978 he was named Apostolic Administrator of Kokstad and appointed Bishop of the same see on 29 November 1980, receiving episcopal ordination on 28 February 1981. During the turbulent changes that marked the South African political scene, he was deeply involved in mediation and negotiation work along with other national and provincial Church leaders. He served as President of the Southern African Catholic Bishops’ Conference from 1987 to 1994.On 29 May 1992 he was promoted to Archbishop of Durban and on 1 August 1994 was named Apostolic Administrator sede vacante et ad nutum Sanctae Sedis of Umzimkulu.

President of the Southern African Catholic Bishops’ Conference (SACBC) (November 1999 – November 2008)

President Delegate of the 2nd Special Assembly for Africa of the Synod of Bishops, “The Church in Africa, at the Service of Reconciliation, Justice and Peace. ‘You are the salt of the earth, … you are the light of the world'” (4-25 October 2009).

Created and proclaimed Cardinal by John Paul II in the consistory of 21 February 2001, of the Title of S. Francesco d’Assisi in Acilia (St. Francis of Assisi in Acilia).

Member of:

  • Congregations: for the Evangelization of Peoples; for Institutes of Consecrated Life and Societies of Apostolic Life;
  • Pontifical Councils: for Culture; for Health Care Workers;
  • Council of Cardinals for the Study of Organizational and Economic Affairs of the Holy See;
  • XIII Ordinary Council of the Secretariat General of the Synod of Bishops;
  • II Special Council for Africa of the General Secretariat of the Synod of Bishops.

Archbishop Luis Antonio Cardinal Tagle

His Eminence Luis Antonio Tagle Archbishop of Manila
Cardinal of the Holy Roman Church
Metropolitan Archbishop of Manila
Province Manila
Diocese Metropolitan See of Manila
See Manila
Elected 13 October 2011
Enthroned 12 December 2011
Predecessor Gaudencio Rosales
Orders
Ordination 27 February 1982
Consecration 12 December 2001
by Jaime Sin
Created Cardinal 24 November 2012
Rank Cardinal-Priest of San Felice da Cantalice a Centocelle
Personal details
Birth name Luis Antonio Gokim Tagle
Born June 21, 1957 (age 55)
Manila, Philippines
Nationality Filipino
Denomination Roman Catholic Church
Residence Manila, Cavite
Parents Manuel Tagle
Milagros Gokim-Tagle
Occupation Cardinal-Priest
Archbishop of Manila
Previous post Bishop of Imus (2001–2011)
Alma mater Ateneo de Manila University
Motto Dominus Est! (It is the Lord!)” – John 21:7
Signature {{{signature_alt}}}
Coat of arms

Luis Antonio Tagle (Latin: Aloysius Antonius Tagle) (born 21 June 1957, in Manila) is a Roman Catholic Filipino cardinal, titular-archpriest of the Church of Saint Felix of Cantalice at Centocelle[1][2] and de facto Primate of the Philippines.[3][4] Appointed by Pope Benedict XVI, Tagle succeeded the Archbishop Emeritus, Cardinal Gaudencio Rosales. Tagle is also the Professor of Dogmatic Synthesis at the Graduate School of Theology of San Carlos Seminary, the archdiocesan major seminary of Manila, and an Associate Professor of Systematic Theology at the Loyola School of Theology of the Ateneo de Manila University.[5]

Tagle is widely known for his charismatic nature[6] and views in line with Catholic teachings.[7][8][9]

Tagle has become involved in many social issues in the Philippines with emphasis on helping the poor and the needy while maintaining opposition against atheism,[10][11] abortion,[12] contraception,[13] and the Reproductive Health Bill.[5] Tagle currently wields strong religious and political influence as the country’s primate, with an estimated 2.8 million professed Roman Catholics in the Archdiocese.[14]

Tagle was installed on the Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe and is currently the head of the Metropolitan See of Manila along with its mother church, the Cathedral-Basilica of the Immaculate Conception, as both its metropolitan archbishop and archpriest.[15]

Tagle was made a cardinal by Pope Benedict XVI in a papal consistory on 24 November 2012 at Saint Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City.[16][17]

College of Cardinals

Biographical notes

[Updated: 26.10.2012]


Notice: the biographical notes are only a working instrument for the press.


 
Cardinal Odilo Pedro Scherer, Archbishop of São Paulo (Brazil), was born on 21 September 1949 in São Francisco, Cerro Largo, Brazil. He was ordained a priest on 7 December 1976 and holds a doctorate in theology and master in philosophy from the Pontifical Gregorian University.He served as rector and professor at São José Minor Seminary in Cascavel and of the Seminary Maria Mãe of Igreja in Toledo. He was also rector of the Nossa Senhora de Guadalupe seminary and philosophy professor at the interdiocesan theology centre.He has served as parochial vicar, parish priest and official of the Congregation for Bishops (1994-2001).

He was appointed titular Bishop of Novi and Auxiliary of São Paulo on 28 November 2001 and was ordained a bishop on 2 February 2002.

In May 2003 he was elected general secretary of the Nationsl Bishops’ Conference of Brazil. On 12 December 2006 the Pope appointed him adjunct general secretary of the Fifth General Conference of the Latin American Bishops.

He succeeded Cardinal Hummes as Archbishop of São Paulo on 21 March 2007.

On 24 June 2008 he was appointed President Delegate of the XII Ordinary General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, “The Word of God in the Life and Mission of the Church” (5-26 October 2008).

Created and proclaimed Cardinal by Benedict XVI in the consistory of 24 November 2007, of the Title of Sant’Andrea al Quirinale (St. Andrew at Quirinale). Member of:

  • Congregation for the Clergy;
  • Pontifical Councils: for the Family; for Promoting New Evangelization;
  • Pontifical Commission for America Latina;
  • Council of Cardinals for Study of Organizational and Economic Affairs of the Holy See;
  • Cardinal Commission for the Supervision of the Institute for Works of Religion (IOR);
  • XIII Ordinary Council of the Secretariat General of the Synod of Bishops.

College of Cardinals

Biographical notes

[Updated: 16.12.2011]


Notice: the biographical notes are only a working instrument for the press.


 

 
Cardinal Leonardo Sandri, Prefect of the Congregation for the Oriental Churches and Grand Chancellor of the Pontifical Oriental Institute, was born on 18 November 1943 in Buenos Aires, Argentina, to parents of Italian descent. He was ordained a priest on 2 December 1967 and holds a doctorate in canon law from the Pontifical Gregorian University.In 1971 he entered the Pontifical Ecclesiastical Academy and in 1974 he served at the nunciature in Madagascar. From 1977 to 1989, he worked at the Secretariat of State. In 1989 he was posted to the United States as counsellor at the nunciature and served as papal representative at the Organization of American States.On 22 August 1991 he became regent of the prefecture of the Pontifical Household and on 2 April 1992, assessor of the section for General Affairs of the Secretariat of State. On 22 July 1997 he was appointed titular Archbishop of Cittanova and Apostolic Nuncio in Venezuela. He was ordained a bishop on 11 October of that year.

On 1 March 2000 he was appointed Apostolic Nuncio in Mexico and later, on 16 September, Substitute for General Affairs of the Secretariat of State. On 9 June 2007 he succeeded Cardinal Ignace Moussa I Daoud as prefect of the Congregation for the Oriental Churches.

He was a President Delegate of the Special Assembly for the Middle East of the Synod of Byshops (10-24 October 2010),“The Catholic Church in the Middle East: Communion and Witness. ‘Now the company of those who believed were of one heart and soul’ (Acts 4:32)”.

Created and proclaimed Cardinal by Benedict XVI in the consistory of 24 November 2007, of the Deaconry of San Biagio e Carlo ai Catinari (Sts. Blaise and Charles ai Catinari).

Member of:

  • Congregations: for Doctrine of the Faith; for the Evangelization of Peoples; for Bishops;
  • Supreme Tribunal of the Apostolic Signatura;
  • Pontifical Councils: for Promoting Christian Unity; for Inter-religious Dialogue; for Legislative Texts,  
  • Pontifical Commissions: for Latin America; for Vatican City State;
  • Special Council for the Middle East of the General Secretariat of the Synod of Bishops.

College of Cardinals

Biographical notes

[Updated: 26.10.2012]


Notice: the biographical notes are only a working instrument for the press, for the exclusive use of accredited journalists.


 

 
Cardinal Peter Kodwo Appiah Turkson, President of the Pontifical Council for Justice and PeaceArchbishop emeritus of Cape Coast (Ghana), was born on 11 October 1948 in Wassaw Nsuta, Ghana.  He was ordained for the Diocese of Cape Coast on 20 July 1975 and holds a doctorate in Sacred Scripture from the Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome.

From 1975-1976 and 1980-1981 he served as staff member at St Theresa’s Minor Seminary, and from 1981-1987 as staff member at St Peter’s Major Seminary. 

On 6 October 1992 he was appointed Archbishop of Cape Coast and was ordained on 27 March 1993.

He was President of the Ghana Catholic Bishops’ Conference (1997-2005) and member of the Pontifical Commission for Methodist-Catholic Dialogue; Chancellor of the Catholic University College of Ghana; member of the National Sustainable Development, Ministry of Environment; member of the Board of Directors of the Central Regional Development Committee and treasurer of the Symposium of Episcopal Conferences of Africa and Madagascar (SECAM).

Attended the Special Assembly for Africa of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, April 10 to May 8, 1994; the 9th Ordinary General Assembly of the World Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, October 2 to 29, 1994; the 11th  Ordinary General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, October 2 to 23, 2005 and the 12th Ordinary General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, October 5 to 26, 2008. General Relator of the 2nd Special Assembly for Africa of the Synod of Bishops, “The Church in Africa, at the Service of Reconciliation, Justice and Peace. ‘You are the salt of the earth, … you are the light of the world'” (4-25 October 2009).

On 24 October 2009 he was nominated President of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace.

Created and proclaimed Cardinal by John Paul II in the Consistory of 21 October 2003, of the Title of S. Liborio (St. Liborius).

Member of:

  • Congregation: for the Doctrine of the Faith; for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments; for the Evangelization of Peoples; for Catholic Education;
  • Pontifical Councils: for Promoting Christian Unity; Cor Unum;
  • Pontifical Committee for International Eucharistic Congresses;
  • XIII Ordinary Council of the Secretariat General of the Synod of Bishops;
  • II Special Council for Africa of the General Secretariat of the Synod of Bishops.

College of Cardinals

Biographical notes

[Updated: 26.10.2012]


Notice: the biographical notes are only a working instrument for the press.


 

Cardinal Timothy Michael Dolan, Archbishop of New York (U.S.A.), was born on 6 February 1950 in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA.

He holds a bachelor of arts degree in philosophy from Cardinal Glennon College, a license in sacred theology from the Pontifical University of St. Thomas, and a doctorate in American Church History from the Catholic University of America.

He was ordained a priest on 19 June 1976 and served as associate pastor at Immacolata Parish in Richmond Heights, Missouri. He also served as liaison for the late Archbishop John L. May in the restructuring of the college and theology programs of the archdiocesan seminary system. In 1987 he was appointed secretary to the Apostolic Nunciature in Washington, D.C.

In 1992 he was appointed vice rector of Kenrick-Glennon Seminary, serving also as director of Spiritual Formation and professor of Church History. He also taught theology at St. Louis University.

He served as rector of the Pontifical North American College in Rome (1994-2001), and taught church history and ecumenical theology at various Pontifical Universities.

On 19 June 2001 he was appointed Auxiliary Bishop of Saint Louis and titular Bishop of Natchez. He was ordained a bishop on 15 August 2001.

On 25 June 2002 he was appointed Archbishop of Milwaukee and then Archbishop of New York on 23 February 2009.

On 31 May 2010 he was sent by Benedict XVI as an Apostolic Visitator to seminaries in Ireland.

He was elected president of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops on 16 November 2010.

Created and proclaimed Cardinal by Benedict XVI in the consistory of 18 February 2012, of the Title of Nostra Signora di Guadalupe a Monte Mario (Our Lady of Guadalupe on Monte Mario).

Member of:

  • Congregation for the Oriental Churches

  • Pontifical Councils: for Social Communications, for Promoting New Evangelization:

  • XIII Ordinary Council of the Secretariat General of the Synod of Bishops.

College of Cardinals

Biographical notes

[Updated: 26.10.2012]


Notice: the biographical notes are only a working instrument for the press, for the exclusive use of accredited journalists.


 

 
Cardinal Marc Ouellet, P.S.S., Prefect of the Congregation for Bishops and President of the Pontifical Commission for Latin America, Archbishop emeritus of Québec, was born on 8 June 1944 in Lamotte, near Amos, Canada. He was ordained a priest for the Diocese of Amos on 25 May 1968. He holds licentiates in theology and philosophy, and a doctorate in dogmatic theology.
Cardinal Ouellet served as consultor to the Sulpicians’ Provincial Council of Canada, and then director and teacher at the Major Seminary of Montreal, where he became rector in 1990. He also served briefly as rector of St Joseph’s Seminary, Edmonton.
He was consultor to the Congregation for the Clergy, then to the General Council of the Priests of Saint Sulpice. He later taught at the John Paul II Institute at the Pontifical Lateran University, where in 1997 he was appointed to the chair of dogmatic theology.
On 3 March 2001, he was named titular Bishop of Agropoli and Secretary of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity; Pope John Paul II ordained him a Bishop on 19 March of that year.
On 15 November 2002, Cardinal Ouellet was appointed Metropolitan Archbishop of Quebec.
Cardinal Ouellet is a member of the
Pontifical Academy of Theology.
Relator General of the XII Ordinary General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, “The Word of God in the Life and Mission of the Church” (5-26 October 2008).
On 30 June 2010 he was nominated Prefect of the Congregation for Bishops and President of the Pontifical Commission for Latin America.Created and proclaimed Cardinal by John Paul II in the Consistory of 21 October 2003, of the Title of S. Maria in Traspontina (Holy Mary in Transpontina).Member of:

  • Secretariat of State (second section);
  • Congregations: for Divine Worship and the Discipline of Sacraments; for Catholic Education; for the Clergy;  for the Doctrine of the Fait; for the Oriental Churches;
  • Pontifical Councils for Culture; for Promoting New Evangelization; for Legislative Texts;
  • Pontifical Committee for International Eucharistic Congresses.

Petrus Romanus: 900 Year Old Prophecy Says Next Pope Will Oversee End of Days

Mac Slavo
February 11th, 2013
SHTFplan.com

In 1139 A.D. the Catholic Saint Malachy was said to have experienced visions during a trip to Rome. He subsequently put these visions to paper and penned a document containing 112 short phrases purporting to describe all future popes that would head the Catholic Church. Though not a part of official Catholic dogma or church teachings, this Prophecy of the Popes is well known by Vatican officials and church scholars because it has been remarkably accurate about naming the last 111 heads of one of the world’s oldest and most widespread religions.

According to researchers, theologians and evangelical scholars, the phrases Malachy scribed in his writings offer up the “nature, name, destiny or coat of arms” of every pope in succession and culminate with the naming of the 112th pope.

This morning, Pope Benedict XVI announced he would be retiring. Jokingly referred to as “God’s Rottweiler” in some circles, the German born 111th Pontiff as described in Malachy’s prophecy is called the Gloria Olivae, or ”glory of the olive,” which some supporters of the prophecy suggest is a reference to the Benedictine Order of monks from whom Benedict got his namesake. The monks are also known as the Olivetans, and are represented by an olive branch, leaving many to believe that Saint Malachy was, once again, right.

Now, according to prophecy, the 112th Pope will step up to head the Church, and he will be named Petrus Romanus, or Peter the Roman.

Whether you’re Catholic, Christian or not a religious person at all, the fact that a 900 year old prophecy is coming to a close is intriguing. And one way or the other, whether its predictions turn out to be true or not, the prophecy concludes with the next Pope.

Eerily, the prophecy describes the Catholic Church’s last Pontiff as overseeing a new era, and one that will be met with great difficulty and destruction:

“In  extreme persecution the seat of the Holy Roman Church will be occupied by Peter the Roman…”

“Who will pasture his sheep in many tribulations and when these things are finished, the city of seven hills will be destroyed, and the terrible or fearsome judge will judge his people.

The End.”

Prophecy of the Popes – Attributed to St. Malachy circa  1139 A.D.

Within the Book of Revelation, also known as The Apocalypse of John, are references to the destruction of the City of Seven Hills (Rome) and to the many trials that will be faced by mankind ahead of the final judgement – the rapture, the rise of the anti-christ, seven years of tribulations, and the end of days.

Suffice it to say, if the prophecy is accurate, then the world will soon be engulfed in a battle between good and evil.

The idea by some Catholics that the next pope on St. Malachy’s list heralds the beginning of “great apostasy” followed by “great tribulation” sets the stage for the imminent unfolding of apocalyptic events, something many non-Catholics agree with. This will give rise to the false prophet, who according to the book of Revelation leads the world’s religious communities into embracing a political leader known as Antichrist. 

Throughout history, many Catholic priests—some deceased now—have been surprisingly outspoken on what they have seen as this inevitable danger rising from within the ranks of Catholicism as a result of secret satanic “Illuminati-Masonic” influences. These priests claim secret knowledge of an multinational power elite and occult hierarchy operating behind supranatural and global political machinations. Among this secret society are sinister false Catholic infiltrators who understand that, as the Roman Catholic Church represents one-sixth of the world’s population and over half of all Christians, it is indispensable for controlling future global elements in matters of church and state and the fulfillment of a diabolical plan called “Alta Vendita,” which assumes control of the papacy and helps the False Prophet deceive the world’s faithful (including Catholics) into worshipping Antichrist.

As stated by Dr. Michael Lake on the front cover of this unprecedented report, Catholic and evangelical scholars have dreaded this moment for centuries. Unfortunately – as you will discover in the next 90 days – time for avoiding Peter the Roman just ran out.

Petrus Romanus: The Final Pope Is Here


The prophecy begins in 1143 with the election of Pope Celestine II, who is described in Latin as “Ex caſtro Tiberis,” or “From a castle of the Tiber.” Celestine II was born in central Italy in a city that sits on the banks of the Tiber river.

Pope John Paul II is referred to as “De labore folis,” or “from the labour of the sun,” and is the only pope to have been born on the day of an eclipse and entombed on one as well.

There are scores of similar parallels between prophecy and pope, adding all the more credence to its legitimacy.

In its last prediction, though the prophecy refers to Petrus Romanus as the shepherd that will pasture his sheep, it may not necessarily mean the Pope will be on the side of the people, or even God. According to Thomas Horn, the author of Petrus Romanus: The Final Pope Is Here, the last pope is not the anti-christ, but he may well be the false prophet who ushers him in – a chilling thought for the billions of Catholics and Christians around the world:

The important fact is this. The very next Pope, following Pope Benedict the XVI who, according to a lot of news coming out of Rome right now – his days are numbered. He’s getting older, he’s getting feeble, he may retire…

The next Pope is the final one on a 900 year old prophecy.

So, imagine how historical this moment is with regard to end times bible prophecy. 

By the way, the prophecy tells us that he will be the false prophet of biblical fame who will help give rise to the anti-christ.

Via: Prophecy in the News
Related: Author Thomas Horn with George Noory on Coast to Coast AM discusses the Prophecy

A Look at the St. Malachy Prophecy:

The Last Pope? A Look at the St. Malachy Prophecy (REV)

Whether coincidence, self fulfilling through the machinations of man, or otherworldly, Malachy’s writings have certainly held the attention of the highest levels at the Vatican for centuries, and perhaps even influenced its decisions.

Now, with Benedict the XVI stepping down, we enter its final phase, and we’ll soon learn how accurate it really is.

Lightning strikes the Vatican — literally

Doyle Rice, USA TODAY2:39p.m. EST February 12, 2013

Papal prank? Or did lightning really hit the Vatican?

I know the pope has connections, but this is extraordinary!

An apparent photo of a lightning bolt striking St. Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican Monday night (left) — the same day that Pope Benedict XVI announced his resignation, stunning the world — has gone viral.

Filippo Monteforte, a photographer with Agence France Press, told England’s Daily Mirror that “I took the picture from St. Peter’s Square while sheltered by the columns. It was icy cold and raining sheets. When the storm started, I thought that lightning might strike the rod, so I decided it was worth seeing whether – if it DID strike – I could get the shot at exactly the right moment.”

Monteforte waited for more than two hours and was rewarded for his patience with not one but two bolts, the Mirror reported.

But could it be fake? One expert, AccuWeather meteorologist and lightning photographer Jesse Ferrell, thinks it’s real. In addition to the account from Monteforte — a trusted and well-known photographer — Ferrell sees telltale signs of a genuine lightning strike.

“I believe the photo is plausible, and since it was taken by a professional, with potential video to back it up, I’d say that the photo is legitimate,” Ferrell writes on his blog.

 

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